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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have just developed this video on efflorescence. I know it covers the information very basic, in time I will develop a more comprehensive video.


My target audience to be honest was apprentices as many are not aware of what efflorescence is though they have probably seen it.

The thing I emphasize mostly is getting to the cause of the efflorescence rather then an in depth discussion on products or chemical preparations & sealers/primers.

I made this video myself, I have passion but I do not have a great deal of skill. I am in the process of utilising students and graduates from the National University of Fiji multi media. I hope that in the future I will be able to create more professional videos.
 

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funny these salts you talk about.. I have been looking into zinc paint for some parts for my truck. I have a can that is 65%zinc but there are others that are as high as 95%. They have a "self healing" property to it.. basically when scratched the surface quickly salts over. That is why galvanized metal is always kinda powdery and whitish/gray looking. The salts take the brunt of what the environment throws at it so the metal is not ate away. When something strikes the object, the surface is scratched and the coating mends it's self.

Is the salt formation a defensive trait or is it just what happens when water goes through a masonry object?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just off the top of my head though we may be using the term "salt" a bit generic. I would like to do some more research and get back to you.

The function of Zinc primers is to provide a cathodic protection referred to as sacrificial coating. The zinc "salts" are a result of the zinc being more anodic, sacrificing itself to the Iron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
funny these salts you talk about.. I have been looking into zinc paint for some parts for my truck. I have a can that is 65%zinc but there are others that are as high as 95%. They have a "self healing" property to it.. basically when scratched the surface quickly salts over. That is why galvanized metal is always kinda powdery and whitish/gray looking. The salts take the brunt of what the environment throws at it so the metal is not ate away. When something strikes the object, the surface is scratched and the coating mends it's self.

Is the salt formation a defensive trait or is it just what happens when water goes through a masonry object?
Some others thoughts on the term salt. "salt" is a generic term that relates to an ionic compound resulting from neutralization. In the case of Zinc it is as a result of the anodic sacrifice.

In the case of efflorescence the loss of water causes crystallization from a hydrated or solvated salt. So it is not the moisture that causes the efflorescence it is the drying out of the water leaving the ionic compound found in the minerals of the masonry surface. The moisture is like the vehicle to draw these compounds to the surface.

I am finding the more I research this subject the deeper it gets. I can't afford to go that deep with my students as I will lose them. In time I may try and find a simple way of explaining this. I had some feedback with regard to more explanation of the types of sealers/primers alkyd v acrylic and the reasons.

So it seems to me that version two will be coming up soon!:blink:
 

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once the "pathways" through the substrate are paved, isn't it just a matter of time till it happens again? Is there anyway to clean into the substrate to clean a "barrier" buffer like zone? Seems that this would be the only way you could get around an area that has already been compromised.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
once the "pathways" through the substrate are paved, isn't it just a matter of time till it happens again? Is there anyway to clean into the substrate to clean a "barrier" buffer like zone? Seems that this would be the only way you could get around an area that has already been compromised.
Good point, can I give that some thought and get back to you. Off the top of my head I am thinking though that if the substrate is sealed and remains free of permeating moisture then the ionic compounds (salts) should not crystallise.

You raise some really good points about the barrier/buffer zone. Makes me really think this one out at a new level.

Really appreciate you pushing boundaries, great feedback.
 
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