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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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For sure :thumbsup:
A former employee from my previous employer said his boss just got hit for 15k. They were on a res job repainting the ext. The labor board was with them. Which is who fined him. Typically when there is a Osha sweep, their not alone 9 times out 10 the labor board will be following. :)
 

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The best thing to do when OSHA steps foot on your job. Is instruct all work to be stop. I've had guys sitting for an hour waiting for them to leave. No matter how good you think you are, they can find something. Average fines run from 5-25k. I would rather pay the employees a hour or 2 of down time.
A few items they will ask for, are your safety rules, emergency kit, water jug with cup holder, MSDS on the job, form 300 Log reports, IIPP.
Those are the most common items they will ask for. If you got those most likely they will move on to the next. Even with all that, do not preform work while there on the job. The one thing you didn't think of or know, it seems that will be the time you will do it or you'll have a employee do something stupid, and you won't be able to fire them for it by law.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How many here use a fall arrest system when working on a ladder over 6 feet?
I need to go back and look at that rule closer, there was something about a leading edge? Is it anytime on a ladder over 6 ft?
 

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PinheadsUnite
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The last time I read the ladder safety rules (six years ago) I do not recall anything about a fall arrest on ladders. With staging, yes, unless you have rails all around.

Ladders need to be set properly with 3 feet extending above the surface you are climbing to.

Vertical ladders (like on water tanks, etc) need a "cage" around them.

At least that's what I remember.

Here's a (long) passage from an article I wrote for the NGPP while it was still in my good graces.

The following passages are quoted from “Standards and Regulations – 29 CFR : Part 1926 “ The exact reference number of each standard is included.

1926.450(b)
"Definitions."
"Scaffold" means any temporary elevated platform (supported or suspended) and its supporting structure (including points of anchorage), used for supporting employees or materials or both.

1926.451(g)(1)
Each employee on a scaffold more than 10 feet (3.1 m) above a lower level shall be protected from falling to that lower level. Paragraphs (g)(1)(i) through (vii) of this section establish the types of fall protection to be provided to the employees on each type of scaffold. Paragraph (g)(2) of this section addresses fall protection for scaffold erectors and dismantlers.

1926.451(f)(15)
Ladders shall not be used on scaffolds to increase the working level height of employees, except on large area scaffolds where employers have satisfied the following criteria:
1926.451(f)(15)(i)
When the ladder is placed against a structure which is not a part of the scaffold, the scaffold shall be secured against the sideways thrust exerted by the ladder;
1926.451(f)(15)(ii)
The platform units shall be secured to the scaffold to prevent their movement;
1926.451(f)(15)(iii)
The ladder legs shall be on the same platform or other means shall be provided to stabilize the ladder against unequal platform deflection, and
1926.451(f)(15)(iv)
The ladder legs shall be secured to prevent them from slipping or being pushed off the platform.


1926.451(h)(1)
In addition to wearing hardhats each employee on a scaffold shall be provided with additional protection from falling hand tools, debris, and other small objects through the installation of toeboards, screens, or guardrail systems, or through the erection of debris nets, catch platforms, or canopy structures that contain or deflect the falling objects. When the falling objects are too large, heavy or massive to be contained or deflected by any of the above-listed measures, the employer shall place such potential falling objects away from the edge of the surface from which they could fall and shall secure those materials as necessary to prevent their falling


1926.1053(b)(1)
When portable ladders are used for access to an upper landing surface, the ladder side rails shall extend at least 3 feet (.9 m) above the upper landing surface to which the ladder is used to gain access; or, when such an extension is not possible because of the ladder's length, then the ladder shall be secured at its top to a rigid support that will not deflect, and a grasping device, such as a grabrail, shall be provided to assist employees in mounting and dismounting the ladder. In no case shall the extension be such that ladder deflection under a load would, by itself, cause the ladder to slip off its support.

1926.1053(b)(5)(i)
Non-self-supporting ladders shall be used at an angle such that the horizontal distance from the top support to the foot of the ladder is approximately one-quarter of the working length of the ladder (the distance along the ladder between the foot and the top support).

1926.1053(b)(11)
Ladders shall not be moved, shifted, or extended while occupied


It is imperative to understand that this is just a small sampling of OSHA regulations that can affect the typical paperhanger. To become better informed, one should seek out all pertinent regulations. They are all on the Internet at www.osha.gov and are available with a few clicks of the mouse. The easiest path would be to type “OSHA Part 1926” into your favorite search engine (google, yahoo, altavista, etc), and then click on the link titled “Safety and Health Regulations for Construction”. Once there, scroll down, click, and read Subpart L – Scaffolds, Subpart M - Fall Protection, and Subpart X – Ladders to see what applies to any situation in which you may find yourself. It is important to note that there are twenty-two states and jurisdictions that currently operate their own plans that may be more stringent than OSHA. You may find more information about those at: www.osha.gov/fso/osp/index.html.
OSHA also publishes two booklets that summarize scaffolding and ladder regulations. OSHA strongly encourages the acquisition of these booklets through it’s website as Adobe Acrobat (pdf) documents. The first, OSHA 3150 “ A Guide to Scaffold Use in the Construction Industry” is located at www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3150.pdf and the second, OSHA 3124 “Stairways and Ladders”, can be downloaded from www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3124.pdf . If you do not have an internet connection, you can call you Regional or Area OSHA Office.
Yes, there is lot to research, read, and learn. Can we find the time with our busy schedules? Haven’t we learned through years of experience how to work safely? Consider this: In 1995, 1,048 construction workers died on the job, with 32 percent, or 335 of them, resulting from falls. Each year, falls consistently account for the greatest number of fatalities in the construction industry. Falls may result from a number of factors, including unstable working surfaces, misuse of fall protection equipment, and human error. So please look at it this way: if you do not make the time now, you may someday find yourself with plenty as you recover from a nasty ladder or scaffolding accident. Insurance doesn’t get much cheaper.
The research for this article necessitated four separate calls to Regional and Area offices of OSHA. Each person reached was extremely helpful, knowledgeable, informative, and personable. It is obvious that OSHA really wishes to help us make our lives injury free. Give them a call for any help or advice. Your taxes are paying for it.
 

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PinheadsUnite
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OOOOOPS,

Meant to add a disclaimer:

These rules are as they were in December 2004. OSHA could have changed them since them.

Please research for the latest regs.
 

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How many here use a fall arrest system when working on a ladder over 6 feet?

From what I read in the manual I have, no harness is required for extension ladders. But I have heard of commercial jobs needing harnesses for step ladders over 6'.
 

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From what I read in the manual I have, no harness is required for extension ladders. But I have heard of commercial jobs needing harnesses for step ladders over 6'.
Unfortunatly, the lead on the harnesses are about 6' long also....
 

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PinheadsUnite
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Sometimes OSHA makes me go, "Huh?"

Your on an eight ft step, what do you tie your harness into? The ladder? So when you fall, you pull the ladder down on top of you?

Isn't that like adding injury to insult
 
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Sometimes OSHA makes me go, "Huh?"

Your on an eight ft step, what do you tie your harness into? The ladder? So when you fall, you pull the ladder down on top of you?

Isn't that like adding injury to insult

From what I heard, they made the company install a track system on the ceiling that the harnesses tied into.

I read my OSHA manual and the actual implementation of much of it leaves me puzzled.
 

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PinheadsUnite
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S.L.

I can't relate the number of serious injuries from people falling off a two footer.

but SHHHHHH,

don't tell OSHA, otherwise we wouldn't be able to sit on the crapper w/o a seat belt and air bag
 
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