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Hello All,
I am new to the forum.
So I just landed my first major job to launch my long awaited painting business.
The house I am doing is a 25,000 sq. ft. home primarily with cedar shake siding.
What is the recommendation for what kind of stain to use? What are the major differences between using an oil based stain compared to a water based one?

Also, what is the recommendation for how many times they should be dipped.
I was thinking twice on the ground and one more after they are hung.

Thank you
 

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Hello All,
I am new to the forum.
So I just landed my first major job to launch my long awaited painting business.
The house I am doing is a 25,000 sq. ft. home primarily with cedar shake siding.
What is the recommendation for what kind of stain to use? What are the major differences between using an oil based stain compared to a water based one?

Also, what is the recommendation for how many times they should be dipped.
I was thinking twice on the ground and one more after they are hung.

Thank you
I just wanna see some pics of the shakes being dipped after they're hung. :jester:
 

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I hope you priced this out properly, I would charge $60- $70 a bundle to dip shakes . Usually. 4-5 bungles in a square. I would use an oil stain , one dip then one coat once on house.
 

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Hi piperzz. Welcome to the forum. Please, with all due respect, understand this seems like a strange question for someone taking on a 25,000 sq ft home. Most contractors have done dozens or hundreds of homes before they go into business.
A professional taking on a stain job usually understands the differences between the choices in products and that multiple coats is a mistake unless the product was engineered to be applied that way.

Using SRD, coat only unless that second coat is applied a year or two later, which may be accurate to how long it would take to dip those shingles.

You do plan on backbrushng those shingles as you dip them right?
 

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Use the search function on this site and you'll find a ton of good info about products to use for cedar shakes. Once you've narrowed it down to a couple products I'd contact the rep in your area to get as much advice as possible from them. If you can, I'd have the rep visit your jobsite as well. I'd also ask the reps to produce sample shakes using the exact same method you'll be using to apply the product.

Congrats on landing a huge job!
 

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Wow, that's a hell of a job. Like others have said, get your technique down with some samples and get a rep from your local paint supplier to make sure you are doing it right (I'm sure he'll be more than willing if you are using his product on a 25,000sf house.)

If it were me, I'd try to only apply one coat after the shakes are hung.
 

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I agree with laser line, 1 coat after they are hung, That's a huge amount of shingles, be creative in dipping, try to get them done with minimal amount of labor
 

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Are these actually shakes (split) or shingles (sawn)? I'm assuming that they're really shingles. Depending on the skill of the crew hanging the shingles, I'm not sure an application after the shingles are installed is even necessary. There should be no raw edges and only face nails right under other trim.

The other big decision along with product, is how to dip and hang the shingles to dry. As many times as you'll be handling each shingle, you've got to have a an efficient approach. A fairly recent Journal of Light Construction had a clever system. At a minimum, a 25,000 ft^2 house will have at least 5,000 square feet of siding. That's for a square, hipped-roofed, one-story box, a pretty unlikely design. If the shingles are installed with maximum exposure, that's 50 squares which would typically be 200 bundles of shingles. Again, that's an absolute minimum.

When you think about how many times you'll have to handle each shingle, you can see why an efficient system is crucial. Pack in the bundles, break them open, grab a shingle, dip it, hang it, remove it, dip it, hang it, remove it, repack it to deliver to the installers.

Another caution: shingles, especially Western Red Cedar, often arrive too wet to stain. They're often installed "wet and tight", so they don't split from nailing and don't need to be gapped. ( they'll shrink as they dry ). That means having to hang them up to dry before you stain them!
 
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