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I can't answer for John, but he did have a video where they talked about shooting it with an hvlp. Don't know what system or setup, or whether it's thinned with the fine paints thinner or just shot straight. Would love to know. I've never tried spraying it, but used a lot of the high gloss black, and also delft blue. Looks sprayed when brushed right too. Amazing stuff.
 

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The spokesman dude looks like he's in a art rock band on the weekends...

and you can tell the deep base was hvlp'd.
 

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straight_lines said:
I watched this today on your blog. I thought for sure the set done in brilliant would have had to have been polished.
Tommy you know I do my fair share of marine painting. That material applied 3 costs of finish comes out polish free. It's all in the quality of the material and the skill of the contractor.

I believe on the satin door jambs it had a slight learning curve on priming, sanding, spackle and caulking. Once the prep is done right and you can see they do outstanding paint prep they put the finish on.

Anyone putting that much into material would do nothing but the very best prep, the job deserves nothing less. It's HVLP for sure and Outstanding as always.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Application Method

We used airless low pressure with 311. We have every sprayer you can imagine; however we defer to the painter applying the finish. We have a special low use pump just for these finishes; new hose; new everything run through with solvent.

Make sure to warm the paint. Tub of hot water is best system in field. If you are using HVLP the can be submerged 3/4 to top in 5 gallon bucket of warm/hot water for ten minutes. The dramatically improves application and reduces seeding for whatever reason.

All the Hollandlac dark colors need to be applied thin and horizontally if possible.
 

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We used airless low pressure with 311. We have every sprayer you can imagine; however we defer to the painter applying the finish. We have a special low use pump just for these finishes; new hose; new everything run through with solvent.

Make sure to warm the paint. Tub of hot water is best system in field. If you are using HVLP the can be submerged 3/4 to top in 5 gallon bucket of warm/hot water for ten minutes. The dramatically improves application and reduces seeding for whatever reason.

All the Hollandlac dark colors need to be applied thin and horizontally if possible.
That is what I was wondering since you mentioned the dark colors needing different application. Also thanks on the warming tip as well. I have a few jobs out for spec, and enamel choices are looking like they will be oils. I have a few doors on one that I play on using fpe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That is what I was wondering since you mentioned the dark colors needing different application. Also thanks on the warming tip as well. I have a few jobs out for spec, and enamel choices are looking like they will be oils. I have a few doors on one that I play on using fpe.
If you think you need to prime for darker/deep base use FPoE clear base; can bump up alot of colorant. Red is absolutely the hardest.
 

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Nice lookin' work SP. What kind of reduction are you guys doing with the airless? Was just using FPOE Hollandlac Brilliant black today on some hand rails. Got a chance to use it side by side against BM's Impervo High Gloss. Seems to brush out and level easier but doesn't setup as fast.

Where in Seattle are you guys working mainly? Done quite a bit of work in the Seattle area.
 

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We used airless low pressure with 311. We have every sprayer you can imagine; however we defer to the painter applying the finish. We have a special low use pump just for these finishes; new hose; new everything run through with solvent.

Make sure to warm the paint. Tub of hot water is best system in field. If you are using HVLP the can be submerged 3/4 to top in 5 gallon bucket of warm/hot water for ten minutes. The dramatically improves application and reduces seeding for whatever reason.

All the Hollandlac dark colors need to be applied thin and horizontally if possible.

Yeah always agood idea to warm the finish coat. Often in residentials we will leave the can on top of a radiator or even on a window ledge so the sun can get at it. I've seen paint cans close to an open fire a few times.:blink: The warmth loosens it up a lot and its much easier to use like this.

Also we generally like to apply gloss as a first coat even if we are finishing in satin/eggshell etc. The gloss dries harder and protects the timber, much like floor refinishers apply 3 coats of gloss prior to the finish coat.

If possible dampen the floor and have buckets of water or pools around the finishing area. The water on the floor will prevent any rising dust and the pools or buckets will attract any particles out of the air, helping to achieve a perfect finish.

Of course these few tips cause a little extra problems but it is well worth it IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nice lookin' work SP. What kind of reduction are you guys doing with the airless? Was just using FPOE Hollandlac Brilliant black today on some hand rails. Got a chance to use it side by side against BM's Impervo High Gloss. Seems to brush out and level easier but doesn't setup as fast.

Where in Seattle are you guys working mainly? Done quite a bit of work in the Seattle area.
Hi Left Coast, 70% of our work on the West side of Lake Washington in the city; as far north as the Highlands and Edmonds.
 

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If possible dampen the floor and have buckets of water or pools around the finishing area. The water on the floor will prevent any rising dust and the pools or buckets will attract any particles out of the air, helping to achieve a perfect finish.
This is a great solution for the always problematic dust that lands on the freshly painted surface during and just after application. In the past to combat the ever present dust issue we've used triple 0 steel wool dipped in linseed oil to gently rub the door down after it is dry to remove the offending dust particles. FPoE recommends this process in their painting manual.
 

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Its what I was thinking, although I figured on flat surfaces like the doors in this thread could be wet sanded and buffed like an automotive finish.

I know lots of cabinet finishes can be done this way, and I assumed fpoe oil enamel as well.
 
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