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Have a client that is wanting to paint over her wallpaper in the kitchen.:no: Not a great idea, i know... No way this will have a warranty. But we have done work for her before and she is a good client. Would you apply BIN for a primer or Gardz? The paper looks to be in good shape, no peeling or anything of that nature. The paper has been on for 10 yrs +. 2 finish coats of Ben Moore after primer.
 

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Rock On
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If I absolutely have to paint over wallpaper, it's oil-based primer for sure
 

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House Painting Reading PA
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Using a oil based primer is a must because water based primer will cause the paper to start bubbling, so no matter how much you hate the smell stick with the oil as a primer.

I would float all the seams first, sand, dust, oil prime then two coats of a 100% acrylic finish. Do not use a cheap paint on this. You need all the help you can get when it comes to painting over wallpaper, but it beats stripping the paper that ends up tearing up the sheetrock.
 

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I'd prefer not to paint over paper, I have used both oil and bin. Bin, shellac based primer, although somewhat runny and stinky dries fast and has never lifted the paper. I use it when the job contains part paper and part unpapered and the same topcoat colour is to be used throughout. It effectively seals any staining also. Once dry I have then done some filling and repairing without the glue lifting and have painted over with a quality latex with never any lifting. I think that it is a kickass product when you wear your respirator. If the job entails painting only over paper then I have used only oil throughout. Why would you not use Bin Pro Wall Guy?
 

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Mr

If it's been on for 10 years with a primer and 2 finish coats, just paiont it with latex, no big deal....

Now there is some bad advice:blink: :no: :no:
 

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Wow! Kitchen may be the worst room to cut corners in... probably is.
If it was a steamy bathroom, paper probably would have come down already.

But if it's been painted over already, for years, it's just a normal repaint that does not get a warranty because the substrate is undeniably suspect.

Oil primer seems pretty popular with the group.
...I don't use it anymore...
A light coat of PVA over wallpaper, then another, after tack, and allowed to dry completely will suffice in keeping the moisture in latex paint from loosening properly adhered wallpaper.
If there's lots of probs with the paper, well, all bets are off.
r
 

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I am SO glad I thought to check the site and this thread before painting over the paper in my current client's house. I told them I've never done it, always removed the paper, but they're insisting on doing it this way to save on labor...so I'm with the "this is a bad idea, no warranty" crowd, but going with an oil primer.

BTW, it's in a bathroom with NO ventilation, but the paper has been on nearly 20 years with no problem. I know it wasn't sized properly, so I don't want to even try to remove it (they said their other bathroom was a real chore to remove and they ripped up the 'rock).

Thanks, all! You confirmed what I suspected, but I needed to hear it from other pro's.
 

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I, too, don't like painting over wallpaper but when it is required because the client will not pay to have it removed I usually use Zinnser's Cover Stain. I like ti use this product over an oil primer because I I don;t have to wait overnight to topcoat. Then two coats of a premium topcoat
 

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Using a oil based primer is a must because water based primer will cause the paper to start bubbling, so no matter how much you hate the smell stick with the oil as a primer.

I would float all the seams first, sand, dust, oil prime then two coats of a 100% acrylic finish. Do not use a cheap paint on this. You need all the help you can get when it comes to painting over wallpaper, but it beats stripping the paper that ends up tearing up the sheetrock.
I would actually oil-prime first. Then float out the seams. The mud could activate the glue in the paper the same way the paint could. Just my $.02

Mack
 

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I, too, don't like painting over wallpaper but when it is required because the client will not pay to have it removed I usually use Zinnser's Cover Stain. I like ti use this product over an oil primer because I I don;t have to wait overnight to topcoat. Then two coats of a premium topcoat
Cover Stain is an oil-based primer. You may be confusing it with 1-2-3, which is also a Zinnser product.

Mack
 
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