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I'm thinking about more effective ways to do repaint projects. Traditionally I have always cut and painted the walls and then cut in the trim afterward. But upon reflection, it would seem more effective to paint the trim first, not bothering to cut in carefully. Once the trim is completed, then the walls can be cut and rolled in. This would eliminate the time-consuming issue of cutting in trim around freshly painted walls.

The opposite approach could be to paint the walls first, painting up to and overlapping the trim slightly to avoid tedious cuts. Then the trim could be painted in afterward. But this would result in more cutting, I think.

So, what do YOU think? What problems am I going to cause by doing it this way? And how do you do it?

Thanks.
 

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You will get at least 2 different opinions on this.:yes: Pick one and go with it:whistling2:
 

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Haven't we been 'here' before? I always like to engineer a job so that things dry in time for the next phase. If you leave trim to the end - you have to wait for coats to dry - that stinks. Do walls first - same thing. Put a coat on the trim - then in the mean time roll a coat on the walls, maybe that takes up your whole day. So that sets you up for second coat on the trim the next day. Then by the time you are done with the trim - go back to the first room - and start cutting in the all the walls you rolled the previous day. By the time you have done cutting - go back and re-roll the walls - then do a last 'dry' cut. Depending on how many are in my crew or what not dictates the order of how things go.

Got a couple of really unskilled guys and one really good painter? Throw the two unskilled guys to slop on paint on the trim - and give the skilled painter a small 9" roller to occupy his time, engineer the job such that when skilled painter is done rolling - the other two unskilled guys are finished. Perhaps on this job, because of your crew, instead of waiting for the trim to dry - have your skilled guy cut in the walls against the first coat of trim. Then split up the two unskilled guys - one to roll walls for the second coat - and another to only 'face' off the trim. Then the second day - shift the unskilled guys over to another job - and leave the skilled guy to cut in the outside edges of the trim - and wrap up a second 'dry' cut on the walls.

Every job is different - and there is an efficient 'path' that dictates how each job is done. There is no one singular right/correct way for a job to be done.
 

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I always paint the trim first...

I usually do 2 coats on repaints..[90% of the time]

Day 1: [Walls]

Prep

Roll

Cut

Day 2: [Walls]

Cut

Roll the finish coat....

This method is used only when I can do the 2nd coat the next day..That way the mud won't flash...Otherwise I have to spot prime....And I always tape my baseboards.
 

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I'm Colour Blind
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I was thinking lately, should I prime before paint? When I come across a job that requires priming, I have all ways painted then prime. I'm not so happy with the results.
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I also always put the 2nd coat 1st. I get better coverage and better hide that way.
:lol::lol::lol:

That's where I'm going wrong.
I see it all now... some of it :blink:
 
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