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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a quote I'm preparing for a client, to repaint his beveled pine paneling (the actual 3/4" beveled/V-groove pine paneling). It's from the 70's, and it's stained and poly'd.

He wants me to paint it, no problem, but I'm curious about the surface prep of the project. It's the main floor and loft of a cabin, so it's pretty wide open with really tall ceilings. I know in a perfect world I should scuff sand and wipe down all of the walls, then prime with CS or BIN. That's my plan of attack for stained/poly'd cabinets and trimwork.

But in this instance, is there an easier approach to going from stained/poly'd to properly adhered wall paint without having to sand, wipe down, and prime... or worse, just drywalling over it? He's a worship pastor at a local church, so keeping job cost down is sort of an issue for him.

My two offhand solutions:

1) Vertical 1/4 lauan over the paneling, seams covered with wood strip, then prime and paint. (Still sort of expensive)
2) Quick scuff sand with 180g, then paint walls with 2 coats PPG Breakthrough cut with water or extender for more open time.

Any solutions or advice on how to approach this would be appreciated. I've done with for this guy before and he really likes my work, I just would like to discuss with you guys how to best approach this project.

Here's a couple photos of the main area he wants painted. (Walls, no trim or ceilings).
Building Wood Interior design Floor Flooring

Wood Building Beam House Wood stain
 

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I think you're original plan is the best one. To me sheet rocking over it would be more labor intensive. Whenever I've ever tried to skip steps to save people money it's always ends up being at my expense
Something will always goes wrong and takes more labor to correct than if I did it right to begin with. Yeah they save money but that cost might be at your expense.
 

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Back, way back - we might have wiped it with WilBond and brushed out while still tacky... Just like it says on the can. I wouldn't do it today because it's nasty, and dangerous but some of the stuff we did 40 years ago is still around and I doubt it has been painted since. Please don't roast me - it was a long time ago and I was working for even older cheapskates...

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Back, way back - we might have wiped it with WilBond and brushed out while still tacky... Just like it says on the can. I wouldn't do it today because it's nasty, and dangerous but some of the stuff we did 40 years ago is still around and I doubt it has been painted since. Please don't roast me - it was a long time ago and I was working for even older cheapskates...

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I remember willbond, stuff stunk to high heaven but it definitely worked.
 

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I would prime with BIN to ensure you don’t have tannins bleeding through. What I commonly see when T&G is painted in the summer is that when it dries out in the winter and the boards shrink you see a line on each board where you didn’t paint. Hard to know how nice of a finish he is looking for, commonly the boards have a lot of knots that become more apparent when painted.
 

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I have a quote I'm preparing for a client, to repaint his beveled pine paneling (the actual 3/4" beveled/V-groove pine paneling). It's from the 70's, and it's stained and poly'd.

He wants me to paint it, no problem, but I'm curious about the surface prep of the project. It's the main floor and loft of a cabin, so it's pretty wide open with really tall ceilings. I know in a perfect world I should scuff sand and wipe down all of the walls, then prime with CS or BIN. That's my plan of attack for stained/poly'd cabinets and trimwork.

But in this instance, is there an easier approach to going from stained/poly'd to properly adhered wall paint without having to sand, wipe down, and prime... or worse, just drywalling over it? He's a worship pastor at a local church, so keeping job cost down is sort of an issue for him.

My two offhand solutions:

1) Vertical 1/4 lauan over the paneling, seams covered with wood strip, then prime and paint. (Still sort of expensive)
2) Quick scuff sand with 180g, then paint walls with 2 coats PPG Breakthrough cut with water or extender for more open time.

Any solutions or advice on how to approach this would be appreciated. I've done with for this guy before and he really likes my work, I just would like to discuss with you guys how to best approach this project.

Here's a couple photos of the main area he wants painted. (Walls, no trim or ceilings). View attachment 114859
View attachment 114858
Coverstain is rated to stick to glass. I would skip the sanding and just prime- it’s not a high traffic area.
 

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It may depend on what colour he is choosing but if he is not concerned with the knots possibly showing through, then just just hit it with a coat of Stix first. (or not) Although that stuff smells too. Are you spraying or brush/rolling? I always figured Advance Matt would be a good option for tall walls where a long open time would be appreciated. As far as I'm concerned, it's still going to be "painted wood" when it's done.
 

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I agree with Holland. Getting dust and cobwebs off is important but I’d skip the sanding and go straight to the primer. Focus a bit more on the knots and you might get lucky - but be prepared to hit some of them a second time between topcoats.
Oh, and think about your application technique. It may look easy but getting paint into those bevel areas can become a PITA real fast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks guys for your replies. The client wants to paint the walls white (of course they would choose that for this particular situation). What I've decided to do (and quoted him for) is this:

1). Contain the floors around areas to be painted

2). I have one of those 9" disc drywall sanding heads that can be attached to a paint pole, so I'm just going to do a quick sand over the varnish//poly with 180g. It may be extra but it's not much extra work to do that before priming.

3). Going to tint-match CoverStain to the wall color, cut with spirits for open time, and brush the bevels then backroll before it dries (a good and solid first coat, then a second with a 3/4 roller. Thought about a 3/4-1" roller for both coats, but there's a good possibility it won't get into the bevels well enough, so I might as well brush the bevels and backroll everything section by section. Could spray, but no.

4). 2 good coats of wall paint, then a plan for a light 3rd for coverage just in case (white just never covers) in 2 coats, even over itself 🙄

It may be a little more work than he thought, but it's the safe route for what he wants to have done 🤷🏻‍♂️
 

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I would prime with BIN to ensure you don’t have tannins bleeding through. What I commonly see when T&G is painted in the summer is that when it dries out in the winter and the boards shrink you see a line on each board where you didn’t paint. Hard to know how nice of a finish he is looking for, commonly the boards have a lot of knots that become more apparent when painted.
Important point I think.
 

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Thanks guys for your replies. The client wants to paint the walls white (of course they would choose that for this particular situation). What I've decided to do (and quoted him for) is this:

1). Contain the floors around areas to be painted

2). I have one of those 9" disc drywall sanding heads that can be attached to a paint pole, so I'm just going to do a quick sand over the varnish//poly with 180g. It may be extra but it's not much extra work to do that before priming.

3). Going to tint-match CoverStain to the wall color, cut with spirits for open time, and brush the bevels then backroll before it dries (a good and solid first coat, then a second with a 3/4 roller. Thought about a 3/4-1" roller for both coats, but there's a good possibility it won't get into the bevels well enough, so I might as well brush the bevels and backroll everything section by section. Could spray, but no.

4). 2 good coats of wall paint, then a plan for a light 3rd for coverage just in case (white just never covers) in 2 coats, even over itself 🙄

It may be a little more work than he thought, but it's the safe route for what he wants to have done 🤷🏻‍♂️
Ref your #2... I can see by the pic the boards aren't flat. I'm afraid your just going to sand nothing but high spots and not accomplish what your trying to do. I vote for dusting. And I'm a guy that likes to sand EVERYTHING!
 
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