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With the exception of house exteriors, organic solvent based coatings and sealants always gave me more confidence than waterborne products. For example, Hoffman's paint had an Alkyd Flat that would cover stains, smoke damage, nicotine, etc. in one shot. Dunne Edwards, as well as other manufacturers, had excellent oil based interior trim enamels that made application easy and ensured solid finishes. Before 100% solid coatings became popular in the industrial painting industry, High solid organic solvent based epoxies and polyurethane conversion coatings couldn't be beat for performance and aesthetics.

However, (and besides the UV sensitive drawbacks of many of these products) organic solvents are dangerous to property, personal health, and the environment. For this reason, I welcome waterborne products despite their inferiority to organic solvent based products.

Consumers are going to have to get used to painters not providing the quality they once did. And if they want a painter to make a latex product look like an oil, or actually demand a painter use organic solvent based products, they need to be prepared to pay a premium for that.

Note: The building product known as paint, has a significantly limited life cycle compared to other building products like, wood, metal, masonry, glass, asphalt, and thermoset plastics. Consumers don't understand this.
 

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Very well said. Think about this concept? We have a gallon of paint, we add half a gallon of primer? What happens. The paint appears blotchy after curing and the surface is very tacky to touch. Paint has the function of protection and appearance, primer is designed to block stains, act as a tie coat between coats, reinforce minimized or questionable surfaces. But wait, DIY and Homeowners need a label where they can get away with one coat and claim the surface was primed and finished. They just eliminated an entire step in the painting process and claim it is valuable because they said so. Sell a lot more paint to lazy individuals and slick contractors who can minimize the labor and material cost of painting. Who wins??? No one.

I did the experiment back in the 1990's, one coat of a premium paint versus 2 coats of the cheapest paint, Just guess who won. Moisture, sunlight and dirt accumulation always overcome the quality of the coating. I have inspected complaints on residences for over 30 years, High moisture designed with trees adding to the dirt accumulation leads to a miserable appearance with the paint job. Stretch the top coat to a covert rate of over 800 square feet per gallon with a .310 tip and the end user has a 2 year life span on his paint job. $5000 versus 2800? Whats the difference.

In the 1970's and early 80's I quit my paint career to work for a company called General Motors. I'm sure few of you remember the paint jobs on a chevy where the quarter panels were peeling after 2 or 3 years. My Step Dad drove a Mercedes and Volkswagons. They received 30 or 40 coats of paint. Whose paint endured the test of time? Look at a late model vehicle nowadays. Some manufacturers look brand new after 5 or 6 years, the other need a complete repaint. Mil build is absolutely necessary or essential to a long paint life. At least the major consideration. Because a manufacturer puts claims and implied warranties on their products doesn't make it so. 25 and 50 year warranties have been printed on tubes of caulk for over 40 years. I have yet to see a claim paid on caulk failure?? Let me know if you have?
I've heard it was about 9-10 layers on those European cars back in the day.


I've also heard people loved the old Volvo 240 factory paint jobs because the original lacquer is so thick usually you can cut and buff it out to look brand new, which you can't really do on a modern base/clear type car.

New cars look pretty sweet because the clears are so glossy without requiring any maintenance, but your only choice is redo whole panels when the clear inevitably chips/etc. Another thing I noticed about new cars vs the oldschool lacquer jobs is the orange peel can be atrocious on even factory vehicles.

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Oh well.
 

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In the 1970's and early 80's I quit my paint career to work for a company called General Motors. I'm sure few of you remember the paint jobs on a chevy where the quarter panels were peeling after 2 or 3 years.
I wonder if GM used the same DuPont Cronar we were shooting cabinetry with back in the 80s…I recall the Cronar failures put a lot of small auto body shops under.
 

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I've used SealCoat for years as a primer over raw wood. It does not raise the grain like water-based primers, so over sanded surfaces, it saves a step. However, when I used it over MDF center panels on some shaker doors I built, the poplar rails and stiles painted well with Advance, but the MDF panels were crazed. I had to sand the Advance and apply 1-2-3 over the Sealcoat to eliminate the crazing.

I have no idea why this happens, but it is easy to deal with. I don't use shellac-based primers under Advance.
 
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