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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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Does anyone have any experience with using a parts washer (possibly heated?) for cleaning brushes.
Here’s my situation: we run a 25 person company, and we encourage employees to come back to our shop for their daily brush cleaning as opposed to on-site where we would dirty someone’s sink, or at home where they’d piss off their wife, husband, or roommates who then start to nudge them to look for a job in a different field. No need for either.
Problem there is our new shop building is on a super modern septic system with pretty fine mesh filtration. My excavator showed me this and urged that I not clean brushes at the sink in the new building.
So…I was thinking we would get a parts washer, and use our Acrastrip 600 solvent replacement (try this stuff!) as the detergent like we do on our ultrasonic, to do the dirty work, keep a 5 gal full of murky water for a pre-rinse, then do only a final rinse in the sink to get the detergent out.
Anyone doing anything like this?
Any recommendations on a parts washer unit? Was looking at this: http://www.renegadepartswashers.com/pdf/manual-TMB-4000-part-washer-spec-renegade.pdf

thoughts?
 

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Tried to search. Didn’t return anything specifically relevant.

Does anyone have any experience with using a parts washer (possibly heated?) for cleaning brushes.
Here’s my situation: we run a 25 person company, and we encourage employees to come back to our shop for their daily brush cleaning as opposed to on-site where we would dirty someone’s sink, or at home where they’d piss off their wife, husband, or roommates who then start to nudge them to look for a job in a different field. No need for either.
Problem there is our new shop building is on a super modern septic system with pretty fine mesh filtration. My excavator showed me this and urged that I not clean brushes at the sink in the new building.
So…I was thinking we would get a parts washer, and use our Acrastrip 600 solvent replacement (try this stuff!) as the detergent like we do on our ultrasonic, to do the dirty work, keep a 5 gal full of murky water for a pre-rinse, then do only a final rinse in the sink to get the detergent out.
Anyone doing anything like this?
Any recommendations on a parts washer unit? Was looking at this: http://www.renegadepartswashers.com/pdf/manual-TMB-4000-part-washer-spec-renegade.pdf

thoughts?
Its brake fluid. Protect yourself
 

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Tried to search. Didn’t return anything specifically relevant.

Does anyone have any experience with using a parts washer (possibly heated?) for cleaning brushes.
Here’s my situation: we run a 25 person company, and we encourage employees to come back to our shop for their daily brush cleaning as opposed to on-site where we would dirty someone’s sink, or at home where they’d piss off their wife, husband, or roommates who then start to nudge them to look for a job in a different field. No need for either.
Problem there is our new shop building is on a super modern septic system with pretty fine mesh filtration. My excavator showed me this and urged that I not clean brushes at the sink in the new building.
So…I was thinking we would get a parts washer, and use our Acrastrip 600 solvent replacement (try this stuff!) as the detergent like we do on our ultrasonic, to do the dirty work, keep a 5 gal full of murky water for a pre-rinse, then do only a final rinse in the sink to get the detergent out.
Anyone doing anything like this?
Any recommendations on a parts washer unit? Was looking at this: http://www.renegadepartswashers.com/pdf/manual-TMB-4000-part-washer-spec-renegade.pdf

thoughts?
I worked at a Billboard Company years ago that did this- A Fifty Gallon drum and mineral Spirits. They would swap out the parts cleaner drum every so often when it got too dirty.
It worked, and was convenient, but a few of the old timers had the shakes, I suspect from washing hands and brushes in it every day.
 

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What kind of paints are we talking about that you'd need Acrastrip? These days 99% of the time my cleaning "solvent" is water.

Easiest solution, I think? Put a finer or just as fine filter (as compared to the septic) in the sink drains, keep on keeping on, and just add sink filter cleaning to the daily regimen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What kind of paints are we talking about that you'd need Acrastrip? These days 99% of the time my cleaning "solvent" is water.

Easiest solution, I think? Put a finer or just as fine filter (as compared to the septic) in the sink drains, keep on keeping on, and just add sink filter cleaning to the daily regimen.
1. good question. I’d just figured that water alone I’m a parts washer would gunk up the washer whereas a detergent or solvent substitute would keep paint residue from hardening in the lines and tank etc.

2. Also a good reply. Would totally work if we were a smaller operation. If we were 3,4 or he’ll even 10 or 12 people I could rely on a policy to keep from wrecking my septic system. But with this many people it’s hard to keep that in place except for a big sign saying “WASHING BRUSHES IN SINK STRICTLY PROHIBITED!!!” Not to mention even the murky water down the drain without the solids will kill the “bugs” in the septic tank that break down the doody.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I worked at a Billboard Company years ago that did this- A Fifty Gallon drum and mineral Spirits. They would swap out the parts cleaner drum every so often when it got too dirty.
It worked, and was convenient, but a few of the old timers had the shakes, I suspect from washing hands and brushes in it every day.
yeah been there. Trying to minimize solvent use, exposure, etc in the new shop, with the transition marking a “turning over of a new leaf” so the say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Its brake fluid. Protect yourself
the polychem stuff? It’s advertised as nontoxic and environmentally friendly. Could it be another company in the paint industry touting something as green that’s actually super gnarly?? That’s unpossible (me fail English?). But yeah we do. Gauntlet gloves and respirators. Gotta be better than most solvents??
 

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the polychem stuff? It’s advertised as nontoxic and environmentally friendly. Could it be another company in the paint industry touting something as green that’s actually super gnarly?? That’s unpossible (me fail English?). But yeah we do. Gauntlet gloves and respirators. Gotta be better than most solvents??
I dont care what any particular chemical company claims. Pull up an MSDS and search the CAS numbers. Similar to whats in an off the shelf dot3.

basically any company that doesnt directly publish an MSDS on their site and makes you 'request' one makes me wary of whats really in their product.
 

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That thing does look cool. I'm sure you'd be fine with like a dawn and eco tsp combo for water based stuff.. This is a great subject though. Currently at my shop I when cleaning my sprayers, I will let dirty water sit in a 5 gal bucket for several days so it settles. Then dump it and let the sludge dry out. Alot of extra work and that is just for 1 guy. Having a good clean up plan is important. I cant imagine all the crap that gets dumped down the toilet.
When we work at clients houses, I try to set up a 3 bucket system. Wash, rinse spin, then dump in the grass somewhere..
 

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I have used a flea market find used crockpot with soapy water to clean paint off of metal hardware. The crockpot died. If I see one at a yard sale, I will buy it.
I used Dawn soap and left it overnight. You would not want to let the handle or ferrule sit in water overnight, so you would have to rig a hanging system.

I bought a brush from Wise Owl Paints that advertises as "self-cleaning". They suggest you suspend the brush in a jar of water and leave it overnight to clean. The ferrule is made from stainless steel. It is a round brush and I find it awkward to use. It does carry a lot of paint to the work. And the self-cleaning bit does work. They do sell flat brushes too. Pricy stuff, but the stainless ferrule, and the ability to clean thoroughly makes it last longer.


 

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So there is a system that separates the solids from the liquids. The jobsite version is basically a 55 gallon drum that you add 2 chemicals too which causes them to separate. You can then safely dispose of the clear liquid and the solids are allowed to dry out and then thrown in the trash. It is a bit pricey at $4000. They also have a stationary 200 gal system for $6000. You can find it on the Grainger site. I am small, so I couldn't justify it. I process mine a few gallons at a time. If I don't stay on top of it, the dirty waste water can start to add up. With 25 guys, you would need one of these systems. It would add up way to fast to do it how I do it, but the concept is the same. This is a picture of a similar system, not the one I was talking about. I couldn't find the site of the one I was talking about. It was about 5 1/2 years ago. I have a similar issue in that I have a leach field and don't want that stuff clogging it up.

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