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Most jobs I these days do not allow solvent and even if they do I can’t afford the time of oil dry times. I accidentally stumbled across Chemcraft products a couple years ago and it almost all I use on new work. Recent paneling job with two larger rooms went like this.

75-85 degrees. Very low humidity. Graco 395 410 ff tip. 1350 pounds measured at gun.

8:00am show up. Set up protection and air scrubbers.
9:00 sand, caulk, bondo, vac and tack.
11:00 spray coat 1st of Chemcraft AquaPrime 3-4 mils
11:15 go to lunch.
12:00 sand and touch up bondo vac and tack
12:30 spray 2nd primer coat 4 mils
12:45-1:30 return calls.
1:30 sand tack and vac.
2:00 spray 1st coat or Chemcraft AquaSet semi-gloss top coat 4 mils.
2:30-3:30 Calls and business stuff.
3:30 spray 2nd coat. No sanding with the prep and air scrubbers (no sags or mistakes this day)
Water Clean up and remove protection and gone by 5:00.
Durable. Slightly lower than expected sheen. KCMA certification. Beautiful finish.
 

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Most jobs I these days do not allow solvent and even if they do I can’t afford the time of oil dry times. I accidentally stumbled across Chemcraft products a couple years ago and it almost all I use on new work. Recent paneling job with two larger rooms went like this.

75-85 degrees. Very low humidity. Graco 395 410 ff tip. 1350 pounds measured at gun.

8:00am show up. Set up protection and air scrubbers.
9:00 sand, caulk, bondo, vac and tack.
11:00 spray coat 1st of Chemcraft AquaPrime 3-4 mils
11:15 go to lunch.
12:00 sand and touch up bondo vac and tack
12:30 spray 2nd primer coat 4 mils
12:45-1:30 return calls.
1:30 sand tack and vac.
2:00 spray 1st coat or Chemcraft AquaSet semi-gloss top coat 4 mils.
2:30-3:30 Calls and business stuff.
3:30 spray 2nd coat. No sanding with the prep and air scrubbers (no sags or mistakes this day)
Water Clean up and remove protection and gone by 5:00.
Durable. Slightly lower than expected sheen. KCMA certification. Beautiful finish.
Interesting. I'm curious as to whether you're paraphrasing what was done during each time frame or if you actually listed everything in the exact order you did it. If all the steps you listed are in order, it appears as though you're tacking over fresh caulk and sanding over wood you caulked 2 hrs prior. A few questions regarding your schedule...

-30 minutes to sand, vac & tack 2 large rooms with panels? How many employees?
-Not quite sure how you're tacking off the surface you just caulked? What type of caulk are you using?
-Not quite sure how you're sanding at noon wood you just caulked 2 hours prior?
-2 out of the 3 times you stated, "sand, bondo, vac & tack", but aren't you also sanding your bondo?
-Is your order "bondo, sand, vac & tack" or is it "sand, bondo, sand the bondo, vac & tack"?
-Maximum Dry Film Thickness of the your total coating system is spec'd @ 4mils, yet your 2 coats of primer @ 7-8mils WFT, 48% solids + 2 coats of finish @ 8mils WFT, 33% solids would put you over 6mils DFT, right?

Not trying to be argumentative. Just trying to get a grasp on your actual finishing schedule. I'm also assuming you're only spot-sanding here and there unless you had a very large crew. Without seeing the paneling in those 2 large rooms, it's hard to understand how else you were able to sand, vacuum & tack in a mere 30 minutes, and one of the times, you even touched-up the bondo within that 30 minute time-frame.

We used to do a ton of new construction where we had houses lined up side-by-side to paint, and could finish a small 3bed, 2.5 bath 1,200sq.ft. interior wood pack in a day, from filling holes, caulking, masking walls, removing doors, spraying them in the garage, priming & painting base, sills, door frames & a single closet shelf in each room, unmask...all in 1 day, but that was with 6 seasoned guys all working in concert over a much more spread-out area than what you're working with. Very interested to hear more about your methods. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Kitchen refinishing and remodeling
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Not exact time to the second (ie maybe 45 minutes for protection and 2 1/2 hours for prep) but order is correct This was all new work mostly just nail holes. I use bondo glazing putty because it drys to sanding in 10 minutes (instead of Crawfords) Alex fast dry caulk. Desert air. Just me and an apprentice. Surfprep sanders on Festool dust extractors. Not new construction just new paneling and chair rail. For me, a big difference has been the air scrubbers instead of plain ventilation. Two scrubbers cost me about $1100 and they paid for themselves in saved labor in a couple weeks. my between coat sanding is greatly reduced and my lungs aren’t doing the filtering any more. The primer doesn’t need a scuff sand if recoated in less than 24 hours. It definitely does not always go like that but this particular job really showed the advantage of using fast drying products. Drying time and time between coats is the main reason I left BM Advance. The Chemcraft primer is awesome stuff for bare wood and MDF. Does not really raise the grain (magic?) easily sands to a fine powder in 45 minutes but lays out terrific. The second round of bondo is just the holes I missed or didn’t do well the first round. Super thin coat ready to sand and paint in less than 10 minutes. Hit those spots first with a bit of primer. It flashes off in a few minutes then hit all the panels with second coat. There is almost no way to make jobs like this profitable if your coming back 2-3 times. This stuff is tack free in 10 minutes for primer, 20 minutes for topcoat. It’s almost like lacquer but not brittle.
The only down side is it isn’t good for refinishing. No stain blocking and not really high build so doesn’t work for Golden Oak.
 

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Interesting. I'm curious as to whether you're paraphrasing what was done during each time frame or if you actually listed everything in the exact order you did it. If all the steps you listed are in order, it appears as though you're tacking over fresh caulk and sanding over wood you caulked 2 hrs prior. A few questions regarding your schedule...

-30 minutes to sand, vac & tack 2 large rooms with panels? How many employees?
-Not quite sure how you're tacking off the surface you just caulked? What type of caulk are you using?
-Not quite sure how you're sanding at noon wood you just caulked 2 hours prior?
-2 out of the 3 times you stated, "sand, bondo, vac & tack", but aren't you also sanding your bondo?
-Is your order "bondo, sand, vac & tack" or is it "sand, bondo, sand the bondo, vac & tack"?
-Maximum Dry Film Thickness of the your total coating system is spec'd @ 4mils, yet your 2 coats of primer @ 7-8mils WFT, 48% solids + 2 coats of finish @ 8mils WFT, 33% solids would put you over 6mils DFT, right?

Not trying to be argumentative. Just trying to get a grasp on your actual finishing schedule. I'm also assuming you're only spot-sanding here and there unless you had a very large crew. Without seeing the paneling in those 2 large rooms, it's hard to understand how else you were able to sand, vacuum & tack in a mere 30 minutes, and one of the times, you even touched-up the bondo within that 30 minute time-frame.

We used to do a ton of new construction where we had houses lined up side-by-side to paint, and could finish a small 3bed, 2.5 bath 1,200sq.ft. interior wood pack in a day, from filling holes, caulking, masking walls, removing doors, spraying them in the garage, priming & painting base, sills, door frames & a single closet shelf in each room, unmask...all in 1 day, but that was with 6 seasoned guys all working in concert over a much more spread-out area than what you're working with. Very interested to hear more about your methods. Thanks for sharing.
I think I need to clarify. We didn’t do 2 large paneled rooms. I did the paneled wainscoting and chair rail in 2 large rooms. And yes after caulking only spot sanding was done. Where I made repairs.
 

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Interesting. I'm curious as to whether you're paraphrasing what was done during each time frame or if you actually listed everything in the exact order you did it. If all the steps you listed are in order, it appears as though you're tacking over fresh caulk and sanding over wood you caulked 2 hrs prior. A few questions regarding your schedule...

-30 minutes to sand, vac & tack 2 large rooms with panels? How many employees?
-Not quite sure how you're tacking off the surface you just caulked? What type of caulk are you using?
-Not quite sure how you're sanding at noon wood you just caulked 2 hours prior?
-2 out of the 3 times you stated, "sand, bondo, vac & tack", but aren't you also sanding your bondo?
-Is your order "bondo, sand, vac & tack" or is it "sand, bondo, sand the bondo, vac & tack"?
-Maximum Dry Film Thickness of the your total coating system is spec'd @ 4mils, yet your 2 coats of primer @ 7-8mils WFT, 48% solids + 2 coats of finish @ 8mils WFT, 33% solids would put you over 6mils DFT, right?

Not trying to be argumentative. Just trying to get a grasp on your actual finishing schedule. I'm also assuming you're only spot-sanding here and there unless you had a very large crew. Without seeing the paneling in those 2 large rooms, it's hard to understand how else you were able to sand, vacuum & tack in a mere 30 minutes, and one of the times, you even touched-up the bondo within that 30 minute time-frame.

We used to do a ton of new construction where we had houses lined up side-by-side to paint, and could finish a small 3bed, 2.5 bath 1,200sq.ft. interior wood pack in a day, from filling holes, caulking, masking walls, removing doors, spraying them in the garage, priming & painting base, sills, door frames & a single closet shelf in each room, unmask...all in 1 day, but that was with 6 seasoned guys all working in concert over a much more spread-out area than what you're working with. Very interested to hear more about your methods. Thanks for sharing.
I used to finish a single story house by myself in two days. However, it was single color, two sheens, so wall masking wasnt necessary. My process was:

Label and pull doors and mask hinges. Put all doors in one room. layed on sides
Caulk sills to window frames
Putty jambs, spackle base, sills and shelves.
Caulk everything else.
Mask windows, showers and wherever else needed, which wasnt much, as this is before tile.
Set up pump.
Prime everything, including tops and door bottoms with the same paint we used on the walls (KM 550 Flat. A good quality flat, BTW)
Clean pump.
Would usually still have an hour or so left in the day, so Id go find one of our exterior crews and help them finish.

Day two:
Sand everything I primed with half sponges, doing any caulk/spackle touch ups along the way.
Get into the trim paint KM 1640 semigloss. Very good quality product.
Spray out all trim with a 211 tip.
Switch to 413, and spray doors in the middle of chosen room, and lean against the wall by the corner.
Clean pump.
Unmask
Get a cut pot with the flat wall paint, and cut it 1:1 with water.
Grab a big brush, and paint down the sides and top of the jambs, and anywhere else the trim meets the wall, about 6-8" out. This just turns the wall back to flat, and touches up perfect. The ultra thinned paint makes this go really fast.
Go help an exterior crew for the remaining 2 hours or so.

It was a damn good production system....
 

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I used to finish a single story house by myself in two days. However, it was single color, two sheens, so wall masking wasnt necessary. My process was:

Label and pull doors and mask hinges. Put all doors in one room. layed on sides
Caulk sills to window frames
Putty jambs, spackle base, sills and shelves.
Caulk everything else.
Mask windows, showers and wherever else needed, which wasnt much, as this is before tile.
Set up pump.
Prime everything, including tops and door bottoms with the same paint we used on the walls (KM 550 Flat. A good quality flat, BTW)
Clean pump.
Would usually still have an hour or so left in the day, so Id go find one of our exterior crews and help them finish.

Day two:
Sand everything I primed with half sponges, doing any caulk/spackle touch ups along the way.
Get into the trim paint KM 1640 semigloss. Very good quality product.
Spray out all trim with a 211 tip.
Switch to 413, and spray doors in the middle of chosen room, and lean against the wall by the corner.
Clean pump.
Unmask
Get a cut pot with the flat wall paint, and cut it 1:1 with water.
Grab a big brush, and paint down the sides and top of the jambs, and anywhere else the trim meets the wall, about 6-8" out. This just turns the wall back to flat, and touches up perfect. The ultra thinned paint makes this go really fast.
Go help an exterior crew for the remaining 2 hours or so.

It was a damn good production system....

I dug up a post of mine from about 5 years ago. It explains the process we did pretty well. Keep in mind that we had already done all walls & ceilings throughout each home, then returned after trim packs were installed. Walls & ceilings were typically painted one color, (usually some form of taupe), with a flat finish everywhere except kitchens, baths & utility room, which got eggshel. The trim was always done in a stock white, using Sherwin's old B47WJ61 Semi-Gloss Quick-Dry Alkyd. Primer was always a lacquer undercoater made by Rodda. I still follow this process to this day for projects with a similar scope of work. Very efficient way to do trim packs while still yielding great results. Anyways, below is the process I'm referring to, copied & pasted from my post in this old thread


When I used to do NC, I'd have my 5 guys start on the trim pack while I removed all doors & hinges, moved em to garage, connect em with 1x2x8's at a lean towards the wall, 2-3 rows. Pre-primed, so only swiped a sponge on the raw ends, paper knobs, blow em off with AC, set up sprayer, spray 2 coats, and the whole thing usually took about 4 hrs. Most were spec homes about 1,400 sq ft ranchers. Average 10 doors per unit plus 6 bi-folds.

We had our systems down pat too. 1 wood pack a day, start-to-finish, and not like the crap you see in most NC these days. First, wood-to-wall caulked, then wall paint painted over the caulking, (allows for perfect contrast line BTW with no chance of seeing caulk after). Then, filling holes, 2 flush-fills on windows & casings, 1 on base. Then, quickly sand spackle holes to remove any build and/or residue. Then caulk wood-to-wood, then mask, air & vacuum. No finished floors yet, no cabs, so other than 12" perimeter around woodwork, only other masking was toilets, showers/tubs, a fireplace & windows. Then, pigmented lacquer undercoat prime, mdf & sills primed twice, then sanding primer, air, vac & tack, real quick fine-flaw check, 2 coats oil, unmask, and I'd re-hang doors while crew was unmasking & doing clean-up
 

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Actually, I spray it with a wet to wet coat and machine sand with 320 to an auto body type undercoat. The enamel holdout is great, but will also raise the sheen level.
Spraying oil, gross. How exactly does it "raise the sheen level"? :unsure:
 

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Spraying oil, gross. How exactly does it "raise the sheen level"? :unsure:
What’s gross about the “spraying” part exactly? I should’ve been more specific I guess, I know if an oil coat goes over 217, the paint drys slower and possibly doesn’t absorb as much. Not sure on the science, I’ve just seen the results.
 

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It gives the illusion of more sheen due to the lack of stipple. Ive seen smooth lids sprayed with eggshell, and where the backroller missed a spot was quite a bit shinier than the rest.
 

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What’s gross about the “spraying” part exactly? I should’ve been more specific I guess, I know if an oil coat goes over 217, the paint drys slower and possibly doesn’t absorb as much. Not sure on the science, I’ve just seen the results.
Well mostly, because spraying oil is soo sticky. Not to mention a pain in the hole to clean your rig after. I hardly ever use oil anymore.
 

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Just joined and first post here..

Scenario: I installed mdf paneling, poplar picture frames and a poplar chair rail - all unprimed. Prior to priming, I lightly sanded with 220 then sprayed a very very light coat of kilz2 primer. The tip I used was a 313. The primer was still just slightly tacky after about 2 days which lead to to research the primer which apparently has something like a 25% failure rate. When i ran my finger nail i could actually peel away the primer to the bare wood. Anticipating worst case scenario, i stripped everything and cleaned with a stripper rinse.

Went to SW, spoke with the rep who recommended their multi-purpose latex primer which has a dry touch time of 30 mins and recoat time of 4 hours. Again, lightly sprayed the first coat using 313 tip. A day later, i have the same problem. The primer is slightly tacky and when i go to sand, it doesn't sand to powder; more like goop. There are also portions where i can scrape the primer off to the bare wood. And, the primer is again just ever so slightly tacky to the touch. This goes for the wood, the mdf and the poplar pieces.

Oh, and lastly, house temperature is approximately 70 deg f, and Ive been running a dehumidifier nonstop.

Does any body have any idea on what's going on here? At first, I thought it was a bad product. Now after using SW, it appears something else is going on. Thank you for any help
I know how we all wish we could get away with a light 220 sanding. Maybe sand a bit deeper and use an oil prime which also blows. Are we all going to die from lung n brain defects? Eh so be it gimme one mo'. Hey best of luck I'm going on 21 yrs painting this march and having some brews cuz I'm a bit bummed. Pardon me please.
 
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