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I need to redo a pool deck that has a san textured peeling paint on it now. Any suggestions on cleaning, prep, or particular brand of coating to use?
 

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Pretty sure it's paint. It's not very thick, 1 mil maybe, and the flaked off pieces break really easily. Looks like one of the pool deck paints that has texture made in.
 

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hmmm... thats a tough one. I would definitely not want to put another coating on that deck without getting every spec of the previous coating off first.

I forgot to ask, is this a concrete pool deck?

As far as substrates go, I know the least about concrete...
 

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If I were to do this job I would blast it all with baking soda.Once your done spray everything down with water until all of the baking soda has dissolved.Re-paint it if need be, but it makes more sense to leave it bare and just powerwash it once a year!
 

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Epoxy Dude
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Ok,

First, if this is outdoor... it's probably not an epoxy... Second, there water based strippers that are commonly used around a pool deck. Many of them attack the paint and lift it off... A bit of pressure washing can speed it up.

Last, pool decks are usually coated with Specialty Acrylic Urethane or other Acrylics (NOT LATEX).

Sorry... that's about all I can say without violating the Terms of Service... :(
 

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Good info, Wolverine, I just cant stand working with any kind of topical stripper!All of that paint/stripper sludge, it just too messy, and usually requires multiple strips to get the job done perfect.I just assume blast the thing and be done with it!
 

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Yep... It's concrete. I know of no way to get all of the old finish off.
Diamond grinder, shot blaster. I'm sure you can hire someone who owns one.

Ok,

First, if this is outdoor... it's probably not an epoxy...
I know of a few epoxies that are recommended for indoor/outdoor use. Even in Wisconsin where the freeze thaw cycle is worse than the Carolinas we have epoxies on outdoor concrete. I see it all the time.
 

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Epoxy Dude
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I just cant stand working with any kind of topical stripper!All of that paint/stripper sludge, it just too messy, and usually requires multiple strips to get the job done perfect.I just assume blast the thing and be done with it!
I understand... There are waterbased products that can take up paint up to 40 mils thick that you would love... Basically, you apply them with an airless paint sprayer... If you wait a couple of days it will dry after delaminating the paint (depending on the paint chemistry)... Then... you sweep it up!

BUT... blasting is better!

Diamond grinder, shot blaster. I'm sure you can hire someone who owns one.
Carolina... Let me know if you need someone... I'm sure we know someone close to you with any kind of blasting equipment you could want...

I know of a few epoxies that are recommended for indoor/outdoor use. Even in Wisconsin where the freeze thaw cycle is worse than the Carolinas we have epoxies on outdoor concrete. I see it all the time.
That doesn't surprise me!
Here is why I said that:
First, epoxies chalk and yellow in sunlight... It is possible to hydrogenate an epoxy resin to give it better exterior durability. However, it's not ever going to match a 2K Acrylic Urethane. In fact, it will probably be more like a standard acrylic.
Epoxy is more expensive than acrylic...
Hydrogenated Epoxy is WAY more expensive than acrylic...
Epoxies do not disipate radiant heat (from sunlight) as quickly as acrylic...

So, I was just kind of thinking that since epoxy is more expensive, less exterior durable, and hot on the feet... more people would use a cheaper acrylic...

We make some liquid ceramic pool coatings... Typically in the Carolinas we see acrylics and decorative concrete overlays... (which contain acrylic).

OK, all of that said... I know that there are still a great deal of people in the Northeast that still used epoxy (they buy it from us wooo hooo). We always tell them they are crazy but they use it just because that's what they've always done... OR... it's winter and our stuff cures at low temperatures.

IMO, Epoxies are the best choice for a pool deck in an INDOOR structure...

I'd use an acrylic here... and... we don't sell them... lol..
 

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I understand... There are waterbased products that can take up paint up to 40 mils thick that you would love... Basically, you apply them with an airless paint sprayer... If you wait a couple of days it will dry after delaminating the paint (depending on the paint chemistry)... Then... you sweep it up!

BUT... blasting is better!


Carolina... Let me know if you need someone... I'm sure we know someone close to you with any kind of blasting equipment you could want...


That doesn't surprise me!
Here is why I said that:
First, epoxies chalk and yellow in sunlight... It is possible to hydrogenate an epoxy resin to give it better exterior durability. However, it's not ever going to match a 2K Acrylic Urethane. In fact, it will probably be more like a standard acrylic.
Epoxy is more expensive than acrylic...
Hydrogenated Epoxy is WAY more expensive than acrylic...
Epoxies do not disipate radiant heat (from sunlight) as quickly as acrylic...

So, I was just kind of thinking that since epoxy is more expensive, less exterior durable, and hot on the feet... more people would use a cheaper acrylic...

We make some liquid ceramic pool coatings... Typically in the Carolinas we see acrylics and decorative concrete overlays... (which contain acrylic).

OK, all of that said... I know that there are still a great deal of people in the Northeast that still used epoxy (they buy it from us wooo hooo). We always tell them they are crazy but they use it just because that's what they've always done... OR... it's winter and our stuff cures at low temperatures.

IMO, Epoxies are the best choice for a pool deck in an INDOOR structure...

I'd use an acrylic here... and... we don't sell them... lol..
Hey, can you PM me a product suggestion for that H20 stripper?I have a job that aia can try it on next week!Thanks!
 

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Epoxy Dude
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Humble Abode...

I just wanted to clarify that I am talking about two different chemistries when I talk about Acrylics & 2K Acrylic Urethane... We do not sell standard acrylics... Just about everyone sells 2K Acrylic Urethanes... There are lots of grades of these as well. We make some 2K acrylic urethanes but they are Aircraft Grade (~$200.00 per gallon depending on the color)... So... you might want to get a lower quality from ICI Devoe or Porter Paints (PPG)... Dupont Imron is one... BASF makes Diamont Solo...

Probably for the money... ICI is the best buy... DEVTHANE 379UVA is a good performer...

Hey, can you PM me a product suggestion for that H20 stripper?I have a job that aia can try it on next week!Thanks!
Unfortunately... I can't... I'd have to make the choice of breaking the Terms of Service ('cause we make them)... or... finding you a competitor... However, you should be able to find something on Google... :(
 

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:thumbup: sandblast/blastrac system easy to do,then acid stain with westcoat specialty coating systems color of choice.it is one of many options that westcoat systems has to offer and they are good people.:notworthy:
 

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Check out peelaway.com which is a paint stripper paste that you put a fibrous material over the top of and peel it away the next day.
 

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Ohio Painting Contractor
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Check out peelaway.com which is a paint stripper paste that you put a fibrous material over the top of and peel it away the next day.

Well they should name it scrape away. By wrapping the fibrous material over the top it encapsulates the paint softening it up and making it extremely easy to scape off. Ive yet to see it ever peel away. It is a great product though
 

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Why go through the trouble of removing every bit of old sh*t? Scrape the failing with a wire brush, 5-way, sandpaper; Prime with a Acrylic Masonry Primer/Sealer; and 2 top coats of an Acrylic Elastomeric Waterproof that can range from 1 and 2 base colors. (of course I'm speaking benjamin-moore products - you get what you pay for)
Should last 8-10 years depending on climate. :)
 
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