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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
All right, lets hear about all those little things you do to make a job go faster/easier. If this thread runs long (which I hope), I'll make it a sticky.

Here a few to start.

Spray some WD40 on a rag, and wipe down the end caps and metal arms of your rollers before dipping it in paint. After the job, the paint will clean off easily. Literally wipe off. Keeps roller frames brand new looking. Also spray the inside cage.

When finished with a 5, use a screwdriver to pry out the rubber seal around the inside of the lid. This works great to hold a piece of plastic over your current paint 5 over night (or during lunch, or over a weekend) while on a job. You can throw a wet rag over the 5, then cut a piece of plastic to cover the whole top, and the rubber seal works like the perfect sized rubber band. Keeps paint fresh for a couple days like this.

When using premix mud, never mix or pull mud out of the 5 it comes in. Scoop out a portion at a time into another clean 5, add a splash of water and dish detergent, and mix it with a drill/paddle. If you mix it in the original 5, or pour off that water, it will dry around the edges, and get chunky. Also always wipe off the inside of the lid when you crack it open to keep the residue from drying out and falling in the mud.

Next!
 

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FT painter/FT dad
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1,254 Posts
-Quick Click stand offs for extension ladders

-Extenda Planks w/ ladder jacks for long runs of soffit, trim, etc.

-When working around bushes, wrap a long runner around and tie in a knot


Thanks for the inital tips PWG...I learned a few new ones :thumbsup:
 

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Systems Fanatic
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This may not be what you have in mind, but I think it helps the job go smoother.

On the first day you start the job, walk around with the customer and look for things like broken windows, paint splatters, overspray, etc. Point these out to the customer and put it in writing. This avoids tons of problems at the end of the job.

Brian Phillips
 

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This may not be what you have in mind, but I think it helps the job go smoother.

On the first day you start the job, walk around with the customer and look for things like broken windows, paint splatters, overspray, etc. Point these out to the customer and put it in writing. This avoids tons of problems at the end of the job.
Brian Phillips
Yea its amazing how, how we get blammed for stuff that was already their,:mad: i had a lady tell me the other day, her deck looked old because my crew got bleach on it, when washing the house, i told her no it was that way when we started, thats why i asked her husband if he wanted a price on it, she shut up real quick. IT PISSES ME OFF TO NO END, PEOPLE TRYing TO GET OVER, WITH CRAP LIKE THAT.
 

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The Lurker
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3,514 Posts
When I first bid on the complex of townhomes I do on a recurring basis, I walked the property (w/ manager) and video taped everything, paint drips and the such that were there from the previous painter (college pro)
 

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Go Cardinals!!!
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145 Posts
Yup, lots of BEFORE pics.:thumbup:
 

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ContractorTalk Crossover
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66 Posts
I agree 100% - Digital pics with time/date stamp on them of anything and everything that is existing and might be of concern later on. A couple times I had jobs that had a lot of shoddy work from the previous painter, overspray, sloppy cut lines, paint drips, etc. I walked it with the homewner pointing everything out, but still had that "gut" feeling, so I took pictures with my 35mm.

After the job was completed, she loved it, paid the balance, and that was it. But a few days later I got a call from her asking what I was going to do about the overspray, drips, etc. Apparently "daddy" came over one night and started picking apart my work. Went back to look at the job, walked it with her and daddy, showed them that everything was existing (drip/overspray colors didn't even match the color we put on - neither of them caught that... Arrrgh!)

Also told them that I always pictures of everything before we start. Daddy said that pictures can be doctored, so it really doesn't matter if I had them. Pulled out a set of prints complete with negatives and he didn't (couldn't) say a word after that. Always trust your gut!
 

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The Lurker
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3,514 Posts
I agree 100% - Digital pics with time/date stamp on them of anything and everything that is existing and might be of concern later on. A couple times I had jobs that had a lot of shoddy work from the previous painter, overspray, sloppy cut lines, paint drips, etc. I walked it with the homewner pointing everything out, but still had that "gut" feeling, so I took pictures with my 35mm.

After the job was completed, she loved it, paid the balance, and that was it. But a few days later I got a call from her asking what I was going to do about the overspray, drips, etc. Apparently "daddy" came over one night and started picking apart my work. Went back to look at the job, walked it with her and daddy, showed them that everything was existing (drip/overspray colors didn't even match the color we put on - neither of them caught that... Arrrgh!)

Also told them that I always pictures of everything before we start. Daddy said that pictures can be doctored, so it really doesn't matter if I had them. Pulled out a set of prints complete with negatives and he didn't (couldn't) say a word after that. Always trust your gut!
hey Mike I have had similar customers like that, now if I get that "gut" feeling I don't bid the job some people are never happy with even quality work, they are always looking to blame someone for something.
 

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I use a Olympus stylus 730.
I think that is the right number, it is water resistant, automatic red eyer reducer on the camera, very easy to operate. 7.1 megapixal. I had a nikon coolpix before that and it was not nearly as user friendly. Plus the stylus has a 3" screen.
for 50 bucks on ebay get yourself a 2gig card for the stylus, it will hold 1000's of high quality pics.
 

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I try all these new fangled ideas cuz I wanna be a gud painter like u guys.

Some just don't work.

Wax in the new 5 was the worst!

It probably took 20 minutes to wash my sleeve off, another 1/2 hour to clean up the paint on the floor, and the bucket didn't seem to rinse out any faster that afternoon. And I got these funny lookin spots all over the walls!
r
 

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I missed this one, I keep two cans in the middle of the yard on exteriors, one for ciggie butts and the other with water... during all breaks/lunch, drop your brushes in the water to keep the brushes moist.

I wet sand rock patches to keep dust down.... rag or a sponge and water smoothes out faster and no mess.
 

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speed comes with quality
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190 Posts
wd40 is the same as goof off but cheaper here are some other money saving ideas.synthetic motor oil will work as pump oil it also replaces penetrol.trans fluid will replace hydraulic fluid,white kerosene works as good if not better than pump armor,household hair conditioner will keep brushes and roller covers soft and hair gel will substitute as floetrol also does any one know of the tilt trick when rolling with satin or eggshell. I like to ask questions to keep it going.
 

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speed comes with quality
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190 Posts
well,I'm really not talking about for a pro.but if you put a rookie on rolling a paint with a sheen you will likely have ropes all thru it it can sometimes happen with flat.but if you tell him to roll it normal about 5ft out then start back over with a slite on the roller,if your going left to right the tilt should be on the right side.leaving an intentional roller line on the right side the left side will feather out perfectly this realy works good when wiz rolling flat doors you paint it fast then go back over the whole door with this technique.
 
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