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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
im gonna be staining a deck that hasn't been treated in 20+years, yet its still in good condition. the HO wants a color used so i recommended BM ArborCoat Solid, which they thought was a good idea.
i know normally when refinishing a deck, it needs to be stripped and powerwashed. then sanded and coated, but because what they want a color fill, is the chem strip and power wash necessary? i think i would be able to just do the sand and vaccume, and fill it in with the solid stain 2 coats, i would love some feedback here, thanks:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

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RedOak said:
im gonna be staining a deck that hasn't been treated in 20+years, yet its still in good condition. the HO wants a color used so i recommended BM ArborCoat Solid, which they thought was a good idea. i know normally when refinishing a deck, it needs to be stripped and powerwashed. then sanded and coated, but because what they want a color fill, is the chem strip and power wash necessary? i think i would be able to just do the sand and vaccume, and fill it in with the solid stain 2 coats, i would love some feedback here, thanks:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
I think stripping would still be best, as it seems to really open up the wood and allow better penetration. However, you could probable get away with sanding only, if you are thorough. The problem with that is the rounded edges and areas between boards that won't get sanded will be adhesion challenged.
 

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Sanding doesn't kill mold. I could put some bleach on just about any sized deck, wash it and be out of there in 1/10 the time it would take me to sand it. If you are putting a solid on horizontals make sure the deck is well ventilated underneath. Solid stains are awful on decks.. don't know why painters insist on going there.
 

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Only when it is already on there. Those stupid high build deck coatings everyone is pushing has only increased the requests. And the bad winter we had increased the failure rates as well.

I have one to strip and redo as well. I know I will not get it far enough down to switch to semitrans. Sand, sand, sand, sand some more.
 

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Sanding doesn't kill mold. I could put some bleach on just about any sized deck, wash it and be out of there in 1/10 the time it would take me to sand it. If you are putting a solid on horizontals make sure the deck is well ventilated underneath. Solid stains are awful on decks.. don't know why painters insist on going there.
Bleach doesn't kill mold either.
 

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Only when it is already on there. Those stupid high build deck coatings everyone is pushing has only increased the requests. And the bad winter we had increased the failure rates as well.

I have one to strip and redo as well. I know I will not get it far enough down to switch to semitrans. Sand, sand, sand, sand some more.
Semi-solid Oil? Still more common than solid oils. A little more hiding than semi-trans, still need the prep. Just a thought.
 

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Only when it is already on there. Those stupid high build deck coatings everyone is pushing has only increased the requests. And the bad winter we had increased the failure rates as well.

I recently looked at a job where the HO had used one, and almost all of it had failed in less then one year. They had several friends that had the same experience. I forgot to ask which one they used, but I will never touch any of them.
 

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I have done some reading since your post. I cannot be sure of the legitimacy of the sources providing the information that I read, but...

Depending on the source, bleach only kills surface mold. It does not kill the spores that may have penetrated surfaces such as wood decks, so the mold will grow back.

Depending upon the substrate, bleach won't or will work.

In a nutshell, I am not certain and am awaiting PressurePros and others to help solve this issue.
 

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SemiproJohn said:
I meant to say that bleach doesn't kill the roots of mold in porous materials.

Here is one link that discusses this.

http://www.spore-tech.com/viewCategory.asp?idCategory=78

This is an interesting debate. I have heard this for years that 'bleach doesn't kill mold', a lot of times you hear it from the manufactures of expensive non-bleach based house washes. The ones I've tried didn't seem to do as well for making the surface mildew disappear immediately like bleach will, and I have just assumed that it was BS. After all, when you put bleach on mildew/mold the visible parts of it go away almost immediately.

Something I have been noticing though on a few houses that I wash regularly is that after a bleach cleaning, the mildew does seem to come back quicker than I would expect. A couple vinyl sided houses that are close to where I live, have to be bleach washed every year because the mildew just comes back that quickly. I have been wondering if there wasn't something else I could do to make the wash jobs last longer. Like maybe a mildewcide applied after washing or something.

It seems counter intuitive to those of us who use bleach in the field to say that 'it doesn't really work' because it appears to work very well. I would also be interested to hear what Pressure Pros has to say about this.

They probably have some top secret additive in there chems that does the job;)
 

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This is an interesting debate. I have heard this for years that 'bleach doesn't kill mold', a lot of times you hear it from the manufactures of expensive non-bleach based house washes. The ones I've tried didn't seem to do as well for making the surface mildew disappear immediately like bleach will, and I have just assumed that it was BS. After all, when you put bleach on mildew/mold the visible parts of it go away almost immediately.

Something I have been noticing though on a few houses that I wash regularly is that after a bleach cleaning, the mildew does seem to come back quicker than I would expect. A couple vinyl sided houses that are close to where I live, have to be bleach washed every year because the mildew just comes back that quickly. I have been wondering if there wasn't something else I could do to make the wash jobs last longer. Like maybe a mildewcide applied after washing or something.

It seems counter intuitive to those of us who use bleach in the field to say that 'it doesn't really work' because it appears to work very well. I would also be interested to hear what Pressure Pros has to say about this.

They probably have some top secret additive in there chems that does the job;)
I am having trouble getting links to post but even clorox website to paraphrase

Bleach will kill surface mold on NON POROUS surfaces. On POROUS surfaces such as wood, or sheetrock when you kill the surface mold it leaves the spores or root still alive and if any condition arises it will regrow.

Now take sheetrock and some sidings you kill the surface with bleach but leave the roots. Then prime with a latex primer and latex paint and you have a mold buffet. Moisture from the primer and paint and for say the sheetrock you have the food (paper)
 

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Neutralizing after is helpful. An excess of bleach can actually be a breeding ground.

The deeper discussion here would be what is mold, what is mildew and what is wood forming it's own protective shell.

Every species is different!
 

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be humble, be honest
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
this was all really helpful, so after i did the knowlege and talking with the HO, we decided to do a semi trans, which means i still have to go through the motions of all the prep, so the op was for not, but i appreciate all the info especially the bleach/mold tangent.
as for that, i ws told that bleach will kill surface mold, but anything that seeps into a pourus surface is not killed by bleach because the water in the liquid is all that seeps into the sufrace, the chlorine in bleach is too heavy and NON PURUS so it wont kill any bacteria or mold spores beneath the surface, just my research/...
 

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True but mildew is a little different from mold.
Not as it pertains to buildings. As it relates to the stuff we see on buildings, it's usually the mold genus Cladosporium that gets called "mildew". That's a misnomer; the true mildews are plant parasites.
 

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Well we all know of that cedar house down the street or whatever and the bottoms of the siding is all black. And Im assuming we all know even with 12% sodium hypocrite your only gonna get so much off, not because the sodium hypocrite didn't do its job, but because the mold/mildew is so far into the wood do to neglect even the strongest mix cant get that deep into the wood. The sodium hypocrite did its job, killing what it could get to. Think about it that siding has been there how long? Wicking up any moisture it could. You cant expect sodium hypocrite to turn back time.

The sodium hypocrite or bleach as lay man call it, effectively kills all spores or roots if treated properly. But its got to be in the right percentages to be effective. And it needs to be thoroughly rinsed or it will produce food for more mildew.

As ugh, bleach breaks down over time what is left is sea salt. Food for mildew.

As for JMAYS and the vinyl siding question. The problem is inherent. Vinyl siding is made from recycled products which is a magnet for mildew. Your not gonna beat it. Pure vinyl wont mildew because its pure,but who can afford that.

All that said sodium hypocrite will effectively kill any and all mold,mildew and algae.
 
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