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Needing to figure out a way to paint over a beeswax (its a mix of beeswax and turpentine) smooth plaster. Product is Cera Novecento - per stucco d'arte from Italy. Anyone ever come across this?
 

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Sounds pretty fancy-shmancy for Eugene. Well, for Oregon actually.
 

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Needing to figure out a way to paint over a beeswax (its a mix of beeswax and turpentine) smooth plaster. Product is Cera Novecento - per stucco d'arte from Italy. Anyone ever come across this?
Gotta remove the wax first and there’s really no quick or easy way around it..primer might initially adhere but will fail and fail big time at some not so distant future date. I’ve dewaxed plaster numerous times using steel wool w/mineral spirits, aggressively scrubbing, wiping it dry, and repeating the washing and wiping several times making certain to change out the wax contaminated wiping towels and steel wool frequently.

If using steel wool you’ve gotta be super careful to make certain that the circuit breakers are turned off for light switches and outlets cause 1 stray strand of steel wool coming into contact with an open electrical device can arc and possibly cause the steel wool to ignite...I’ve personally witnessed that happening twice. A safer yet less effective option is either a 3M green or maroon synthetic pad. I wash and wipe no less than 4 times, the final washing with clean wiping towels.

I then scuff up the plaster with an orbital or r/o sander w/a grit that won’t compromise the plasterer’s mechanical integrity. I’ll then prime with an acrylic primer such as 023 and perform any repair work over that. Sometimes I’ll sample a small area with primer and perform an adhesion test just to make certain before jumping into primer.

I worked with a big artisan plastering outfit in Manhattan ~ 20 years ago doing wax removals and level 5 prep for re-coats and never experienced any adhesion issues when following the previously described method. I wasn’t as thorough when painting over waxed Marmorino plaster in my foyer, having wiped it once with thinner and scuff sanded it. The paint ended up coming off in large sheets which made for a real easy removal.
 

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Yup, what he said. I had to do this last November, on a wall I originally plastered about 15 years ago. I used a green 3m pad and a bazillion shop towels. I primed with oil because I’m stubborn. I ended up with one not so large area where the basecoat resisted, so I had to redo that area.

No other solution unfortunately.
 

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Gotta remove the wax first and there’s really no quick or easy way around it..primer might initially adhere but will fail and fail big time at some not so distant future date. I’ve dewaxed plaster numerous times using steel wool w/mineral spirits, aggressively scrubbing, wiping it dry, and repeating the washing and wiping several times making certain to change out the wax contaminated wiping towels and steel wool frequently.

If using steel wool you’ve gotta be super careful to make certain that the circuit breakers are turned off for light switches and outlets cause 1 stray strand of steel wool coming into contact with an open electrical device can arc and possibly cause the steel wool to ignite...I’ve personally witnessed that happening twice. A safer yet less effective option is either a 3M green or maroon synthetic pad. I wash and wipe no less than 4 times, the final washing with clean wiping towels.

I then scuff up the plaster with an orbital or r/o sander w/a grit that won’t compromise the plasterer’s mechanical integrity. I’ll then prime with an acrylic primer such as 023 and perform any repair work over that. Sometimes I’ll sample a small area with primer and perform an adhesion test just to make certain before jumping into primer.

I worked with a big artisan plastering outfit in Manhattan ~ 20 years ago doing wax removals and level 5 prep for re-coats and never experienced any adhesion issues when following the previously described method. I wasn’t as thorough when painting over waxed Marmorino plaster in my foyer, having wiped it once with thinner and scuff sanded it. The paint ended up coming off in large sheets which made for a real easy removal.

That's hell. I've never heard of this before but now know to just say "uh, no." Next job please?
 

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Gotta be Evergreene.
No, it wasn’t them. I worked ahead of Fresco & Art-In-Construction on a few projects, along with another Brooklyn based outfit whose name slips my mind, de-waxing and prepping existing plaster according to their specs, with me doing the grunt work, yet not working directly for them, but working for the designers or GC’s. I also was a partner/owner of a small plastering biz which was dissolved it in the latter part of 2000’s.
 

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Just out of curiosity, but what's the deal with bees wax on walls? Obviously something to do with plaster and faux. I could google it, but since we're (mostly you're) right here talking about it.... I'm feeling a little ignorant.
 

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Just out of curiosity, but what's the deal with bees wax on walls? Obviously something to do with plaster and faux. I could google it, but since we're (mostly you're) right here talking about it.... I'm feeling a little ignorant.
It’s the final step in finishing off high polished plaster and serves as a water resist. It’s usually troweled on or spatula applied and can be buffed up to a brilliant mirror-like sheen. Mineral or metallic powders, as well as pigments are sometimes added to the wax to provide a shimmery effect or a patina. Petroleum/engineered waxes can be used as well.
 

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Wow. Just decided to do a google image search on this. It made me feel a little primitive applying boring old eggshell Revere Pewter or whatever on a daily basis. Kudos to you folks who faux. It's truly a world beyond just simply painting. I don't think I'd have the patience for it and definitely not the artistic skills.
 

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Just out of curiosity, but what's the deal with bees wax on walls? Obviously something to do with plaster and faux. I could google it, but since we're (mostly you're) right here talking about it.... I'm feeling a little ignorant.
So what’s good about plaster in the last IDK 7-8 years is there are many plasters that can get super shiny without any type of wax. You just have to time it right to burnish when it’s ready. Also, there’s some water based ‘waxes’, like Cera del Vechio:
https://www.venetianplastershop.com.au/product/beeswax-cera-del-vecchio-2-5l37-5sqm/

We used to call it camel snot because, well, you know. If I had to paint over that, I’m not real sure how I’d remove it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Gotta remove the wax first and there’s really no quick or easy way around it..primer might initially adhere but will fail and fail big time at some not so distant future date. I’ve dewaxed plaster numerous times using steel wool w/mineral spirits, aggressively scrubbing, wiping it dry, and repeating the washing and wiping several times making certain to change out the wax contaminated wiping towels and steel wool frequently.

If using steel wool you’ve gotta be super careful to make certain that the circuit breakers are turned off for light switches and outlets cause 1 stray strand of steel wool coming into contact with an open electrical device can arc and possibly cause the steel wool to ignite...I’ve personally witnessed that happening twice. A safer yet less effective option is either a 3M green or maroon synthetic pad. I wash and wipe no less than 4 times, the final washing with clean wiping towels.

I then scuff up the plaster with an orbital or r/o sander w/a grit that won’t compromise the plasterer’s mechanical integrity. I’ll then prime with an acrylic primer such as 023 and perform any repair work over that. Sometimes I’ll sample a small area with primer and perform an adhesion test just to make certain before jumping into primer.

I worked with a big artisan plastering outfit in Manhattan ~ 20 years ago doing wax removals and level 5 prep for re-coats and never experienced any adhesion issues when following the previously described method. I wasn’t as thorough when painting over waxed Marmorino plaster in my foyer, having wiped it once with thinner and scuff sanded it. The paint ended up coming off in large sheets which made for a real easy removal.
Thank you for sharing your experience as well, I was thinking along similar lines. My first response to the question was "run"!
 
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