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I'm a GenX'er.... At one point we were the loser generation... we were the grunge generation... but now we're the bulk of the productive workforce. Hopefully the Millennials and Gen Z's will come into their own someday also. I haven't seen it yet for sure, but poverty will eventually begin to suck and maybe they'll decide to work. I agree the ease of quitting jobs today is just a different thing, but that's because we've gone through decades of easy times. If things get tough, things will change - but that's a whole different set of problems. For now, we have to hope things stay good economically and find a way to get people to work like they give a sh##.
I think the only way the Mill's and Gen z's can be motivated today, is if there's a social injustice attached to the purpose. Because at the end of the day, it's trendy to care, even though it's not as important as having a social media presence.

A few ideas to motivate young painters:
1. Have Che Guevara T-Shirts printed out as part of the company painting uniform
2. Offer faux graffiti graphics for those socially enlightened customers
3. Have a company float for the next protest or riot

Just brain storming. It's a slow Friday.
 

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I think the only way the Mill's and Gen z's can be motivated today, is if there's a social injustice attached to the purpose. Because at the end of the day, it's trendy to care, even though it's not as important as having a social media presence.

A few ideas to motivate young painters:
1. Have Che Guevara T-Shirts printed out as part of the company painting uniform
2. Offer faux graffiti graphics for those socially enlightened customers
3. Have a company float for the next protest or riot

Just brain storming. It's a slow Friday.
I don't care who you are...that's funny right there.
 

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I'm a GenX'er.... At one point we were the loser generation... we were the grunge generation... but now we're the bulk of the productive workforce. Hopefully the Millennials and Gen Z's will come into their own someday also. I haven't seen it yet for sure, but poverty will eventually begin to suck and maybe they'll decide to work. I agree the ease of quitting jobs today is just a different thing, but that's because we've gone through decades of easy times. If things get tough, things will change - but that's a whole different set of problems. For now, we have to hope things stay good economically and find a way to get people to work like they give a sh##.
Also the smallest generation (some credit that to birth control becoming widely available around that time). It is interesting to note that Gen X spans 16 years while most generations are around 20 years.
 

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Observation:

Social media is directly responsible for societal insecurity. Consequently, it's hard to be motivated, or inspired when you've been defeated before you've ever got started.
 

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I am a millennial and worked as a sub, oddly my millennial boss was in a lot of ways the worst boss. My Boomer boss was a lot better, not perfect, but much easier to work for, more relaxed, and much more organized and thought out in job planning. I think as a negative trait among millennials, this post from another forum could sum it up.

"Competency is decreasing at an alarming rate, and with most people I really think the issue is worldview. It's not so much as people are just 'becoming dumb', but that the only reason anyone is motivated to do anything is as a means to an end. I hardly ever meet anyone irl who appreciates understanding a technology or system or mechanism or language, etc. or anything just for the enjoyment of understanding and how it may contribute to their better understanding of other things. That I believe is competency, a general understanding of how things work, and no one wants it. They want just the result and will go through the minimum amount of understanding it takes to get there and then dump it when they have arrived. Physician competency is tanking because of the way medical school has become. Most of them are adderall cramming for exams and have little to no regard for their ability to care for patients. The 'patient' does not exist in their worldview, only does 'being a doctor' exist for them, and once they have become a doctor, the drive to understand fades."
Obviously everyone wants to complain about their boss, but I think my old boss and me could have been great friends if not boss and employee, and we were similar ages, etc. But I have the oldschool "let's find out how everything works" mentality, and he had imo the exact mentality as above.

So with how it applies to this post, imo, I don't think money is the ultimate motivator. Obviously you need money, but if a place is run in a dysfunctional manner, it sucks. It also sucks to be chasing problems all the time and putting out subpar work. With my last boss, his strategy basically always was "go faster to go faster" and skipping priming something there, cleaning something there, caulking something there, sanding something there, etc. I would rate him as a physically better painter than me, but his approach was always like that if he could get away with it. It sucked, but what was funny but sad was, a lot of his gambles and lack of planning and strategy got me more money as an employee. I'd get entire extra weeks of work on jobs, when if he did my strategy I told him of "Hey, do a primer coat first or it'll flash" we'd take an extra couple hours but not get hung up for days and days at a time.

I'm actually reminded a lot of the GM/NUMMI situation with GM and Toyota management style. And why I think "productivity" or "going faster" is a stupid metric. (Obviously you should be efficient, but efficiency comes from technique and planning, not going faster to go faster.)


One night last fall Barker, along with the rest of the second shift, was sent home early after GM ran out of a reinforcement panel that is welded next to the wheel wells near the motor compartment of the Camaros and Firebirds. The panels come in pairs--one for the right side, one for the left--and when the plant ran out of panels for one side, the assembly line stopped.

“A night shift supervisor came down,” Barker recalled, and for the next 20 minutes, “he actually took one of the panels from the other (wrong) side and . . . literally tried beating it into place with a hammer and then welding it.”

This Rube Goldberg fix-it took so long, Barker said, that GM decided “it wasn’t worth it, so then they sent us home.” But if the wrong part could have been forced into place faster, he believes, “they probably would have run” the assembly line.
There's so many things like this that happen in painting, that don't need to happen.

I mean, we can call people selfish, entitled, etc, but I think optimistically most people do want to have some work they can be proud of, but if your environment isn't about that, it builds resentment among everyone.
 

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Question:

When the Tech Generation experiences a significant portion of their lives in a controlled virtual landscape, where rewards and acceptance are immediate, and where negatives are effortlessly addressed from the protection of a bubble, what's left to be inspired by in the real world?

Good post BTW celicaxx
 

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Question:

When the Tech Generation experiences a significant portion of their lives in a controlled virtual landscape, where rewards and acceptance are immediate, and where negatives are effortlessly addressed from the protection of a bubble, what's left to be inspired by in the real world?

Good post BTW celicaxx
I think that's a mischaracterization of "millennials." I think it might be 100% true about Gen Z, though.

I think millennials are in some ways, the most interesting or even historically important generation (I know, speaking highly about myself here) in that we're the only generation to basically experience two separate ways of life. Both the "virtual" world and the real world, depending on when you were born, etc (as a 30 year old Boomer anyway.) As in, we learned both the analog and digital way to do something at relatively the same time. Experience both a cassette deck and VCR, to an mp3 player, to a smartphone streaming with Spotify. To go from Windows 95 and DOS to smartphones, too. I think the problem millennials is being trapped between two generations and ways of thinking, the Boomer analog way, and the digital way. We yearn for the older social structures and old ways subconsciously, even if our exposure was limited, generally it was in our formative years when we were young. We spend tons of time in meaningless online nonsense, but still remember going to our friends houses before online gaming was a thing, and playing Goldeneye or Street Fighter until our parents picked us up at night. We remember campfires at Vacation Bible School and it being a fun time. We remember going to the mall and carnivals and all that kind of thing. We remember a time when seemingly political disagreements, race, and sexuality weren't really factors for who was friends or at least friendly with each other.

So what psychologically kills millennials is we're a weird stopgap generation. We didn't get the true "Stranger Things" kind of life of 80s kids that could wander around and do whatever, and had helicopter parents, and lived in a paranoid post Columbine and 9/11 world. But with technology, we didn't have the advantage of say, Youtube, to look up how to do essentially anything in the world. There wasn't even wikipedia then. Even learning languages, when I attempted to learn Japanese as a kid in 2001 or so, all I had was some charts from the internet, and I went to my local library to get books and cassette tapes. Now there's apps you can speak directly to in your pocket, or trace characters with a stylus, and they don't even cost any money. Obviously every generation says the generation after them has it easy, etc, and while Zoomers definitely have it much worse from an economic and social perspective, they're the only generation to really reap rewards from all this technological advancement. I don't think us millennials at least as kids/teens could really reap the rewards since the scale, functionality, and cost of tech was so limiting.

A downside is I think Zoomers don't really know how to troubleshoot tech or have a true understanding of tech. If you're born quite literally with a tablet in your hand, it's the same as being a Boomer. It's like having a magic brick from space. They never had to use a command prompt to troubleshoot their Windows 98 box when they were 12 years old, so Zoomers are imo usually as clueless about tech and how things actually work as a senior citizen.
 

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Observation:

Social media is directly responsible for societal insecurity. Consequently, it's hard to be motivated, or inspired when you've been defeated before you've ever got started.
What's kind of odd to me among some millennials but moreso a significant portion of Zoomers (Gen Z) is with social media, caring more about appearance than actuality. I know people that wear $1000 outfits of Gucci and Supreme, but ride the bus every day. There's a very distinct lack of pragmatism.

I notice moreso a trend of looks, or sort of hyper self awareness, which is why everyone claims to have anxiety now. Everything is "cringe." If you watch home videos of a high school or something from the 1990s, the way everyone acts is much different than today, as they were not conditioned into knowing how they exactly look at any given time in front of a camera. With this self awareness, there's lots more generally staging everything in different facets of life.

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This is a random picture of a computer desk setup from 2004. It's not extremely messy, but it's cluttered and it's how people actually lived.

Now if you go look at people's gaming computer setups, it's usually always in some manner like this, and hyper staged and pristine looking.

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Now if you go on a computer subreddit or similar, anything short of something like this is considered poverty level.

Sorry to take over a marketing thread about bonuses to talk about vast societal issues, but hey.
 

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celicaxx said:
Sorry to take over a marketing thread about bonuses to talk about vast societal issues, but hey
I think the social aspect of what motivates the latest generations, is an important component of this thread in terms of rewards for production.
 

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I sense that social media has a particular revolutionary aesthetic that appeals to the sensibilities of many young people who have little obligation other than to themselves. And given the increasing speed and breadth at which information, entertainment, and communication is delivered, it's no wonder everyone wants to participate in this wonderful chaos. Unfortunately, this lends itself to group think that's often disguised as individualism.

And although television seduced the Boomer generation, it didn't have anywhere near the grasp of it's participants as social media and the internet in general has on it's participants. This is evidenced in behavior at the workplace where the techno generation is easily distracted compared to the focused Boomer.

Bottom line, our Monkey brains aren't equipped to manage the techno seduction, let alone remove it's Python grip from our narrow necks when we've attempted to embrace it.
 

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I sense that social media has a particular revolutionary aesthetic that appeals to the sensibilities of many young people who have little obligation other than to themselves. And given the increasing speed and breadth at which information, entertainment, and communication is delivered, it's no wonder everyone wants to participate in this wonderful chaos. Unfortunately, this lends itself to group think that's often disguised as individualism.

And although television seduced the Boomer generation, it didn't have anywhere near the grasp of it's participants as social media and the internet in general has on it's participants. This is evidenced in behavior at the workplace where the techno generation is easily distracted compared to the focused Boomer.

Bottom line, our Monkey brains aren't equipped to manage the techno seduction, let alone remove it's Python grip from our narrow necks when we've attempted to embrace it.
I think maybe in my posts, and possibly what many (but not all) millennials want is self actualization in the classic Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs scale. I think the problem is, millennials have the base needs half fulfilled, and half not. So it leads to a weird dichotomy.

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The bottom needs are fulfilled in the sense of living with your parents or 5 different roommates, ****, Tinder, fast food and frozen junk instead of home cooked nice meals, etc. But I would argue they're not really fulfilled in the same way Boomers had them fulfilled, with their own house, wife, kids, etc. And fulfilling those needs might be seen as nigh on impossible now. (40% marriage rate.) So Millennials aim for the top two, but the pyramid is still weak at the bottom, and only half fulfilled. Boomers on the other hand (in my mind) rarely aimed or thought of self actualization, and their life was about the bottom 3 in the pyramid almost exclusively, and society was kinda centered around that for the most part, too.

So with "revolution" and whatnot, it's failed self actualization, but marketing towards that. That you can be special and finally achieve self actualization and esteem by joining X or Y revolutionary thing. Buy our clothes and phone because we support X or Y revolutionary thing.

But I think from a work perspective, to bring it back to bonuses and what millennials want or don't want. The companies trying to hire hip millennials mostly aim for the self actualization angle, with Google providing yoga rooms, free counseling, vegan organic cafeteria, skateboarding in the halls, whatever. The idea is by working for them, beyond just money, they will help you further self actualize. In the past American companies especially under unions promised the bottom three needs would be fulfilled if you put your work in, and you'd get your safety and security. Japan had a similar arrangement with their large conglomerates, and "salarymen" and lifetime employment schemes. Now, society is competitive instead of cooperative (which I think you said before) and it's often not a reasonable expectation to expect your employer to keep any promises they have to you about upward advancement or stability within the company.

I don't think anyone can provide a true promise of safety or security these days, so when the going gets bad you just quit. Maybe part of it is conflict resolution too, millennials definitely have a tendency to end relationships, and "cancel" lifelong friends by "ghosting," etc. Part of it is in work environments, without really an ability to... argue, when problems come up, you basically are stuck with two options of stick around and do everything halfass, or quit the job. I think the social acceptance of arguing or face to face conflict of any sort is just significantly less now, with workplace safety incidents in the 80s and 90s being a big thing. I've even heard it argued a specific millennials' issue that way is them being the Daycare Generation, where some magical adult will intervene in any problem, of another kid not sharing a toy, letting them play ball games with them, etc, so people never learn interpersonal conflict resolution skills as kids compared to just naturally on a playground, or among siblings and cousins, etc.
 
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