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Hey now, I just finished reading an article in Fine Woodworking- June '09 regarding exterior oil finishes. The product that held up best was from a company called Smith & Co. http://www.smithandcompany.org/. It is called [Epifanes Clear Varnish] and in the test that were ran it outlasted the other products big time, Watco, McCloskeys and water based clears. To be fair, I did notice it took 5 coats of Smiths vs. 2 and 3 of competitors and it is pricey at around $78. for a kit that completely covers 10 sq. ft., but for a small furniture gig this would be the way to go.



 

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I almost bought a quart of it from a Marina to try for front doors last week. They preferred Sikkens marine coating there. They felt Sikkens was easiest to maintain (although I am not sold on the tinted colors in the finish, it sounds similar to the Door and window product, but more of a high end spar finish). For the Epifane, they did say it was good, but in boat applications, if it got a scratch through the finish it would fail quickly.
 

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re

You cannot glue failing paint to a failed surface. If it is flaking, you have to get it off down to a secure surface. Then prime before you paint again.
 

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House Painting Reading PA
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McCloskey® Man O'War® Spar Marine Varnish.

We used this stuff all the time for interior wood as a finish coat over stains of coarse.

Do not want anyone asking if it can be applied over a latex white or something :eek:
 

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PinheadsUnite
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IMO, McClosky's M-O-W Spar Varnish has ranked tops, but it disappeared from the market around here about 7 years ago, some have said when Valspar bought it. I don't know about that.

Although I do not use it for an exterior application, I do put varnish through hell and high water - I use it to coat my wallpaper table. The finish sees lots of razor cuttings (but not deep cuts) and lots of washings.The soft resilient resins in a quality Varnish actaully "self heal" a bit.

The last time I refeinished my table, I was forced to use Epifanes. Definitely a different application technique that McClosky's - used a different reducer, was it Naptha ?

After 18 months it seems to be withstanding the rigors of my trade as well as McClosky's. I generally apply four to five coats of whatever I'm using.

BTW, DeanV said he was told. " if it got a scratch through the finish it would fail quickly". IMO that is true of any coating. If you scratch through the coating to the substrate, especially in a marine setting, moisture will get in and lift the coating. My preference for a Spar Varnish is because it is more difficult to scratch than the brittle surface of a polyurthane.
 
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