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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just about wrapping up a job that we removed the old hollow core doors and installed using solid 6 panel radiata pine doors and ewp trim. All wood was conditioned using minwax and stained using custom match S-W wiping stain. Sprayed 3 coats of minwax water based helmsman satin(excellent product for interior trim). Installed the new small chandelier as well.





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Looks good.

Not sure where you are, but here in Oregon, if you did electrical work without being licensed to do so and the state CCB “were to find out”*, they would have your azz for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and for an evening snack. Then any leftovers would be served up again for breakfast the next day.
*the key phrase here
 

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Looks good.

Not sure where you are, but here in Oregon, if you did electrical work without being licensed to do so and the state CCB “were to find out”*, they would have your azz for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and for an evening snack. Then any leftovers would be served up again for breakfast the next day.
*the key phrase here
I'm not sure if installing a chandelier would be considered"electrical work".
I remove and install lights all the time. If your running new wire, that would be a different story. But I also live in Newfoundland, it's the wild west here..
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Some more wood finishing that I’ve done on the current job. The customer needed some new thresholds made up. They had a new floor installed and it was over the existing making the old thresholds useless. All originated as 5/4x6 red oak. I enjoy making them. It’s time consuming but they do look sharp installed.







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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I’ll just keep posting on a thread I started a while back. Totally different job. Large interior repaint. All trim was satin impervo and we scuff sanded with 220 and dirtex all trim. Two coats of advance stuck with zero issues. Using advance high gloss black on bookshelves (also previously satin impervo). I’ll have more pics but I’m 100% .sold on advance of properly prepped oil




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I’ll just keep posting on a thread I started a while back. Totally different job. Large interior repaint. All trim was satin impervo and we scuff sanded with 220 and dirtex all trim. Two coats of advance stuck with zero issues. Using advance high gloss black on bookshelves (also previously satin impervo). I’ll have more pics but I’m 100% .sold on advance of properly prepped oil



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Did you pick the right thread? This one wasn't about Advance sticking to oil?

No matter - I'll just emphasize the "properly prepped." I did have a house at one point that was mostly oil trim where some of it - like some doors - was, I'm pretty sure painted over with Advance. I found some partly used advance cans on site in at least about the right white, and the finish just looked like Advance. So it could have been something else. But, in any case, it did not pass the fingernail test. But it looked like no prep had been done. Maybe cleaning, but not sanding as the oil underneath was still smooth and glossy.

I'll mention too, though, that this was also the job where I tested out Stix over oil without anything more than a dusting (no sanding or other deglossing). It was just crown molding so I wasn't that worried about it and just did one test pc before proceeding piece. I do still sand before Stix on things that will see more abuse, even so. It's still best practice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I posted it here to show the pics of the high gloss advance. Not it’s ability to stick to oil or for that matter start a new thread for a couple of pics. Paint talk goes down the most inane rabbit holes. Just trying to stop that one useless post at a time.


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Looks good.

Not sure where you are, but here in Oregon, if you did electrical work without being licensed to do so and the state CCB “were to find out”*, they would have your azz for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and for an evening snack. Then any leftovers would be served up again for breakfast the next day.
*the key phrase here
That’s a dumb rule.


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Didn't respond to this when it was posted 8 months ago but since the thread was jump started...

I don't think it's all that dumb.

Out here we have fairly strict licensing guidelines and you are simply not supposed to travel outside those lanes. When you think about it, that is a good thing for the average consumer. It prevents Joseph from Joe's Blow and Go Painting from pretending he's an electrician (or plumber) and doing something he's not qualified to do. And really, the licensing is just one aspect. My biggest concern was always my insurance and what it wouldn't cover IF I did something I wasn't trained or licensed to do and as a result, serious damage occurred to a structure or worse, someone died as a result.

True, the latter was not likely to happen, but in our litigant minded society, it wouldn't take much for someone to go after you if faulty electrical or plumbing had been done when you had no business doing it. Having a fire or serious water damage occur that I would be on the hook for, with my insurance company refusing to assist, would be a nightmare scenario IMO.
 

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Didn't respond to this when it was posted 8 months ago but since the thread was jump started...

I don't think it's all that dumb.

Out here we have fairly strict licensing guidelines and you are simply not supposed to travel outside those lanes. When you think about it, that is a good thing for the average consumer. It prevents Joseph from Joe's Blow and Go Painting from pretending he's an electrician (or plumber) and doing something he's not qualified to do. And really, the licensing is just one aspect. My biggest concern was always my insurance and what it wouldn't cover IF I did something I wasn't trained or licensed to do and as a result, serious damage occurred to a structure or worse, someone died as a result.

True, the latter was not likely to happen, but in our litigant minded society, it wouldn't take much for someone to go after you if faulty electrical or plumbing had been done when you had no business doing it. Having a fire or serious water damage occur that I would be on the hook for, with my insurance company refusing to assist, would be a nightmare scenario IMO.
I will occasionally do a light if I need to remove for a drywall repair, or if I drop lights for a texture removal and a wire comes unattached. But my typical answer is I'm not an electrician and I'm not plumber, and then go into my spiel that while I am capable it won't be covered by the insurance if God forbid something were to happen.
 

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I will occasionally do a light if I need to remove for a drywall repair, or if I drop lights for a texture removal and a wire comes unattached. But my typical answer is I'm not an electrician and I'm not plumber, and then go into my spiel that while I am capable it won't be covered by the insurance if God forbid something were to happen.
Same here. Removing a light, such as in a bathroom, is no big deal. Putting it back isn't either. Hell, I wired my entire kitchen addition twenty years ago. But these days, if an HO thought that an issue was caused by the painter messing around with electrical stuff...
 
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