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I like BIN as it sands really well, you can wetsand it like automotive primer almost after being on a day. Just sands mirror smooth. I think if he did two coats and used it as a filler/sanding primer it would look awesome, but he still has a possibly failing coating underneath. I've used Breakthrough and Advance and would say Advance is definitely more oil like, but Breakthrough isn't bad. Breakthrough would feel like a better version (much better version) of Proclassic, Advance would feel/look more close to oil. Since it's a 50s house and they're wanting to go for something retro by keeping the cabinets, Advance might just "fit" better in terms of finished feel. I'd also try to go satin vs gloss to hide some imperfections, too. On the original paint job you can even see some stipple/etc that I don't think you'd get with modern paint and even a microfiber cover, so you might actually need something like Bondo glazing putty over some spots to skimcoat it out, if you're not going to bare wood.
 

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My dad was an old union paint contractor in the fifties and sixties. Everything got a coat of white shellac before using the Paragon or Ben Moore alkyd flat. The only failure he experienced with shellac is when moisture gets behind the coating. Restoration contractors use BIN after water or smoke damage following a hurricane or other disaster. Sometimes old is much better than new technology. It took about ten years before manufacturers learned how to make self leveling paint. Shellac is the eighth wonder of the world
 

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I buy and fix up old houses and rent them. Occasionally I will flip them but I usually like them too much to sell them. My part in the deal is usually a bunch of restorative painting. That said I wouldn't think about replacing those cabinets! It will however be a bunch of work to get them where you want them. Maybe more than they are willing to pay. Hopefully they will stay with white and a semi gloss sheen and be happy with something a notch or two better than the Proclassic job you previously did.

I would recommend that you take the roughest door and do the inside of it as a test. The process you used previously should work here but probably will require a little more diligence. I would stay with the BIN shellac primer and I would top coat with general finishes white poly semi-gloss. After two coats I would lightly wet sand with 400 grit or maybe 600 grit with a block sander. You have to get enough finish on before or you will send through to the wood or primer. I spray on my final coat horizontally and try to float it as much as possible. You may have to wet sand the the final coat. In this situation I use the higher grits 800 to 1000 or even higher. You can polish it up with Meguairs #2 compound. This is a rubbing compound for automotive finishes to remove swirl marks.

Good luck to you.
 

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I am assuming that the owners want to maintain the authentic retro look of the kitchen, hence their desire to have you repaint the cabinets. Otherwise, replacing them would likely be the most efficient way to go. No matter how nice a paint job is applied, they are still going to have a dated look about them - not a bad thing if that is the actual goal.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Sherwood is tintable but available in five gallon buckets only. Maybe you have a friendly Sw
Store and will breakdown the five into individual units for you. We had a used furniture dealer across from the store and we would perform custom tints in the clear base. I think Sw has outlawed that practice check with the
Store.
I went into Sherwin today for some stuff and since I was there I asked the guy what he recommends as a cabinet primer. I told him a lot of guys like BIN and he looked at me funny. I told him it's a shellac primer and he just stared at me. Finally he walked to the computer and said "you want a shellac???" He had never heard of it. 😜
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Breakthrough through looks and feels pretty darn nice plus you can recoat in two hours verses 16. You can spray them late in the afternoon and have not a problem transporting and hanging them the following morning.

You just have to make sure you can get the v50 in your area, the v51 is not rated for cabinets. Also, make sure you spray it with a 308 tip any other size and you'll be hating life.

If this were my job I'd clean then sand with 220, wood fill and sand again then prime with Bin. Bin lays down so smooth I rarely ever see the need to sand them again unless I see a speck of dust in it or something. Hitting them with 320 won't hurt but may not be necessary. Then spray them twice with v50 Breakthrough satin and they'll be looking nice.
Apparently the PPG up the street from me carries the 250. VOC. At least that's what Google tells me. I'll have to stop in and confirm.

Any recommendation on wood fill for cabinets?
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Unless you strip those bare, you're never going to get it looking like a factory finish. They're in rough shape.

Your method seems fine for most cabinets, but these look like they'll need extra TLC in the prep department. The existing paint isn't adhering well, which means anything you put on top of it is limited by the existing paint.

I'd sit down with the customer and try to break the news to them gently. It would be cheaper to buy new cabinets than to do all the work necessary to make those ones perfect. Offer them a Band-Aid solution of cleaning them up and making them look better, but be clear that it isn't necessarily meant to last.
I broke the news to them. Just gonna stick to my original plan. I started prep today and most of the paint is in decent shape. I think they'll look just fine when I'm finished. I often forget that homeowners don't typically see what we see, so I'll do my best and I'm sure they'll be pleased.
 

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Upon closer inspection, I found a felt lined utensil drawer. Any thoughts on what to do with this thing?
View attachment 111122 View attachment 111123
Knock the dividers out then sand the crap out of the rest of the inside of it. Guess you could always reline it but once it is painted, I would just make some new dividers to put into place. Or, if you want to protect the new finish, look into getting some pieces of acrylic to place on the bottom and sides and for making new dividers. Of course, you might get lucky and locate a pre-made divider that will fit well.
 

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Knock the dividers out then sand the crap out of the rest of the inside of it. Guess you could always reline it but once it is painted, I would just make some new dividers to put into place. Or, if you want to protect the new finish, look into getting some pieces of acrylic to place on the bottom and sides and for making new dividers. Of course, you might get lucky and locate a pre-made divider that will fit well.
I concour. I'm sure he could just find a utensil tray.
 

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I just threw a coat of citristrip on it and after about an hour it's coming off like butter with a razor blade. Gonna leave it overnight because the grain is still a little green. Should come out with minimal sanding if nothing else.
put plastic over the citristrip to keep it from drying out
 
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