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It may be backwards, but I always sand first, and then wash them down. I figure that way I've dusted them at the same time as cleaning.
I used to do the exact same process as you listed until we ran into a situation where there was a massive amount of surface contamination on the cabinets due to 40 years of cleaning the ornate crown molding above the cabinets with Murphy's Oil Soap, (only learned that later). The cabinets had been painted several times but the crown was still natural/varnished. After days of chasing possible reasons for fisheyes, we finally figured it out after talking to the nice old lady who had lived there since her husband built the home. We sanded crown first, then cabinets, then the rest of the trim in the room, then followed up with a thorough dusting & cleaning. After priming you could see the high concentration of fisheyes on the upper cabs and gradually faded into slightly less fisheyes the further you got away from the crown molding. She never cleaned the cabs or the trim with Murphy's, just the crown above the cabs.

A simple change to our order of operations could've prevented this by cleaning first in order to eliminate the risk of cross-contamination. It was an expensive lessen to learn, but something I'll never forget.
 

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I used to do the exact same process as you listed until we ran into a situation where there was a massive amount of surface contamination on the cabinets due to 40 years of cleaning the ornate crown molding above the cabinets with Murphy's Oil Soap, (only learned that later). The cabinets had been painted several times but the crown was still natural/varnished. After days of chasing possible reasons for fisheyes, we finally figured it out after talking to the nice old lady who had lived there since her husband built the home. We sanded crown first, then cabinets, then the rest of the trim in the room, then followed up with a thorough dusting & cleaning. After priming you could see the high concentration of fisheyes on the upper cabs and gradually faded into slightly less fisheyes the further you got away from the crown molding. She never cleaned the cabs or the trim with Murphy's, just the crown above the cabs.

A simple change to our order of operations could've prevented this by cleaning first in order to eliminate the risk of cross-contamination. It was an expensive lessen to learn, but something I'll never forget.
I've generally thought that way. I don't want to be trying to sand old grease (or old Murphy's residue). Give me a clean surface to sand.
 

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Yeah, sometime you have to clean em‘ before sandingunless you want to deal with gummed up paper for a few extra hours, or even days.
 
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Yeah, sometime you have to clean em‘ before sandingunless you want to deal with gummed up paper for a few extra hours, or even days.
That alone makes it obvious why you would want to degrease any surface before sanding. But even where you can't see grease, oils, or other contaminates, it's a best practice to wipe the surface if only to remove airborne contaminates.

No doubt, degreasing is a annoying step in the painting process. When we used to apply more oil based paint, it wasn't as much of a concern for us self taught painting engineers, whose knowledge was based on rationalization rather than science. It wasn't until I learned about the SSPC standards that I had a better understanding about surface preparation and paint failures. For example: Surface contamination has to be remove prior to abrasive blasting in order to prevent contaminates from being impregnated into a bare steel, or concrete substrate.
 

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What is the consensus with these steps:

1. Degrease - (with Liquid TSP) and Rinse with clean water.
2. Sand - with 220 (?)
3. Dust - surface with (what do you use?) Denatured Alcohol if oil paint is on surface, what about with latex- water? Damp microfiber? other?
4. Prime
5. Paint
 

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What is the consensus with these steps:

1. Degrease - (with Liquid TSP) and Rinse with clean water.
2. Sand - with 220 (?)
3. Dust - surface with (what do you use?) Denatured Alcohol if oil paint is on surface, what about with latex- water? Damp microfiber? other?
4. Prime
5. Paint
1. For basic previously painted doors, I like using Jasco no rinse phosphate free TSP. I mix a mild concentrate proportions and spray it from a bottle. I use electrical contact cleaner for more difficult spots where oils are present because it evaporates quickly. For larger scrubs, I'll use any number of degreasing products and warm water.
2. I like using 220 because it isn't aggressive and it provides a more even cut than 180. (unusual surface conditions aside)
3. I'll typically just use a duster unless the finish requires a flawless high sheen. Then, I'll lightly wipe with a tack cloth or other no shedding material)
4. Priming will depend on the previous coating, the finish sheen and color of the new coating, bare substrates, or required specifications
5. I also will provide some sort of finish coating after having gone through all of the above.
 

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I also like Krud Kutters‘ Deglossing formula for cleaning off greasy surfaces.
 
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1. For basic previously painted doors, I like using Jasco no rinse phosphate free TSP. I mix a mild concentrate proportions and spray it from a bottle. I use electrical contact cleaner for more difficult spots where oils are present because it evaporates quickly. For larger scrubs, I'll use any number of degreasing products and warm water.
2. I like using 220 because it isn't aggressive and it provides a more even cut than 180. (unusual surface conditions aside)
3. I'll typically just use a duster unless the finish requires a flawless high sheen. Then, I'll lightly wipe with a tack cloth or other no shedding material)
4. Priming will depend on the previous coating, the finish sheen and color of the new coating, bare substrates, or required specifications
5. I also will provide some sort of finish coating after having gone through all of the above.
I really like the no-rinse TSP! Although... I'm wary to trust it as truly "no rinse" and prefer to rinse anyways, just to be safe. There have been a few times when I didn't rinse it, and had no problems.
*I don't use tack cloths, except rarely when working with oil paints and varnishes, because of the risk of leaving Linseed oil residue/contamination on the surface.
 

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I really like the no-rinse TSP! Although... I'm wary to trust it as truly "no rinse" and prefer to rinse anyways, just to be safe. There have been a few times when I didn't rinse it, and had no problems.
*I don't use tack cloths, except rarely when working with oil paints and varnishes, because of the risk of leaving Linseed oil residue/contamination on the surface.
I'm also wary about tack cloths. I started using special solvent wipes I got from the automotive paint store, but I rarely painted a finish that required that much detail.
 

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I really like the no-rinse TSP! Although... I'm wary to trust it as truly "no rinse" and prefer to rinse anyways, just to be safe. There have been a few times when I didn't rinse it, and had no problems.
*I don't use tack cloths, except rarely when working with oil paints and varnishes, because of the risk of leaving Linseed oil residue/contamination on the surface.
I've gone from tack cloth to slightly damp microfiber. I've really come to trust the microfiber. I'll still do tack cloth on occasion if I'm in all oil based, like between coats of standard polyurethane..
 

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What is the consensus with these steps:


1. Degrease - (with Liquid TSP) and Rinse with clean water.
2. Sand - with 220 (?)
3. Dust - surface with (what do you use?) Denatured Alcohol if oil paint is on surface, what about with latex- water? Damp microfiber? other?
4. Prime
5. Paint
That's pretty much what I do, but a couple added steps:

MY procedure:

1. Washing: -2 buckets. 1 With tspe,dawn and hot water. Blue scotch pad. Old toothbrush for corners.Other with Clean hot water and microfibe cloth.
2. Sand: - 150-180 grit. with RO and sanding blocks.
3. Dust: Vaacum, dry micro fibre cloth, Compressed air (directly before spraying).
4. Prime: - BIN/Stix or other.
5. Sand Primer, dust again.
6. Paint. Airless. 1 Coat on backs, 2 on fronts.(usually)Paint backs first. Spray edges on every coat. Using Advance but looking into other products.
7. Light sand between coats with 400 or similar foam back sponge. (if neccasary)
Side note: Still mostly rolling the boxes. Spray all the doors in my shop.
 

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That's pretty much what I do, but a couple added steps:

MY procedure:

1. Washing: -2 buckets. 1 With tspe,dawn and hot water. Blue scotch pad. Old toothbrush for corners.Other with Clean hot water and microfibe cloth.
(y) - good idea with two buckets and blue scotch pad/toothbrush! Sounds like you do wash, rinse and dry for each door right away. Are you using powdered TSP, if so, thoughts on Liquid TSP?
2. Sand: - 150-180 grit. with RO and sanding blocks
150 seems pretty rough... is it really necessary to use such a coarse grit?
3. Dust: Vaacum, dry micro fibre cloth, Compressed air (directly before spraying).
makes sense.
I usually avoid compressed air when painting to try to keep the wind movement down, but the sprayer is making enough wind on its own that it's probably a moot point.

4. Prime: - BIN/Stix or other.
5. Sand Primer, dust again.
6. Paint. Airless. 1 Coat on backs, 2 on fronts.(usually)Paint backs first. Spray edges on every coat. Using Advance but looking into other products.
The guy from Door rack Painter said he recommends painting both sides (back and then front and sides) in one go. Was thinking about trying that this next time... He transfers them from sprayer to rack with 4" plastic yellow wedges that have sandpaper glued to them. Then he touches up the minor spots when dry with a foam brush.
7. Light sand between coats with 400 or similar foam back sponge. (if neccasary)
Side note: Still mostly rolling the boxes. Spray all the doors in my shop.
you sand between paint coats too? Does this make a difference? Any paint gumminess happening? I rarely do that, unless there's some noticeable reason that forces me to, just because I'm afraid of something showing in the final coat.
You do quality work Kevyn, appreciate your thorough answer. Always enjoy looking at your finished examples.
A had a few follow-up comments I'd like to throw out there, as you were kind enough to share your approach ...(in blue)...
 

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You do quality work Kevyn, appreciate your thorough answer. Always enjoy looking at your finished examples.
A had a few follow-up comments I'd like to throw out there, as you were kind enough to share your approach ...(in blue)...
Go buy a few cabinet doors from your local Restore or someplace similar. Painting both sides works better than you may think, with the doorrack system. The hardest part is carrying the damn doors with the plastic paddles.
 

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You do quality work Kevyn, appreciate your thorough answer. Always enjoy looking at your finished examples.
A had a few follow-up comments I'd like to throw out there, as you were kind enough to share your approach ...(in blue)...
Thanks Holland. Like yourself, I'm always learning. I found a system that works for me but always tweaking things a bit here and there. Cabinets have been 50% of my business over the past few years. See answers in Red.
1. Washing: -2 buckets. 1 With tspe,dawn and hot water. Blue scotch pad. Old toothbrush for corners.Other with Clean hot water and microfibe cloth.
(y) - good idea with two buckets and blue scotch pad/toothbrush! Sounds like you do wash, rinse and dry for each door right away. Are you using powdered TSP, if so, thoughts on Liquid TSP?
- I dont normally use real tsp, rather the concentrated ECO tsp. It has no phosphate in it. But keep the real stuff near by for problem areas..
2. Sand: - 150-180 grit. with RO and sanding blocks
150 seems pretty rough... is it really necessary to use such a coarse grit?
- I don't have an issue with it personally. I find 220 too fine actually. Primer fills in most sanding marks anyhow.
3. Dust: Vaacum, dry micro fibre cloth, Compressed air (directly before spraying).
makes sense.
I usually avoid compressed air when painting to try to keep the wind movement down, but the sprayer is making enough wind on its own that it's probably a moot point. - Very low pressure, just to blow off any fuzzys
4. Prime: - BIN/Stix or other.
5. Sand Primer, dust again.
6. Paint. Airless. 1 Coat on backs, 2 on fronts.(usually)Paint backs first. Spray edges on every coat. Using Advance but looking into other products.
The guy from Door rack Painter said he recommends painting both sides (back and then front and sides) in one go. Was thinking about trying that this next time... He transfers them from sprayer to rack with 4" plastic yellow wedges that have sandpaper glued to them. Then he touches up the minor spots when dry with a foam brush.
- I don't have the door rack system, so only paint 1 side at a time. Should probably get that system to up my production to be honest.

7. Light sand between coats with 400 or similar foam back sponge. (if neccasary)
Side note: Still mostly rolling the boxes. Spray all the doors in my shop.
you sand between paint coats too? Does this make a difference? Any paint gumminess happening? I rarely do that, unless there's some noticeable reason that forces me to, just because I'm afraid of something showing in the final coat.
- Probably not necassary, if recoating within 24 hours. Mostly do it just very lightly to knock any nubbys off.
 

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Discussion Starter #57
Customer finally picked colors. Specd BM Advance. Lowers are pretty dark, wondering if I need to tint my primer?

Also, is it just me, or does that seem too dark to use on the interior?
111214
 

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It's not too dark, if it's what the customer wants. Dark lowers are all the rage, these days.

Advance, that dark, will take months to cure, though. Make sure they know it'll stay tacky for a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Nobody will be living there for some time so that should be alright. As long as I turn the heat up and rip the thermostat off. Seems they keep turning it down on me.

I don't think it's too dark for the exterior of the lowers, I'm just not sure about going dark on the interior of the lowers. I feel like that would make it hard to find anything.
 

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I've never liked giving advice on colours. Taste is very subjective. They can hire an interior designer if they want help picking colours.

I only ever speak up if they're using the wrong coating for the job.
 
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