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Its been a while since I was lead certified, but I dont remember having to collect wastewaster.
 

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I use the OPs method (scrape/sand, then wash) due to the massive number of chips that go flying when you pressure wash a house like that before scraping. How do all you wash-it-first types contain chips, especially on lead jobs?
I guess if the house is THAT bad, it might be a good idea to do a round of scraping before a powerwash. I RARELY did houses in that shape though. And when I did, we would just sweep it up real good when it dried, and maybe take a rake to a lawn. One time, my boss had to shop vac a ladies backyard cuz the the paint was flaking so bad on a wood awning or something when I powerwashed. In hindsight, I probly should have scraped that part first. Lead is a WHOLE other ballgame, and I wont even go into that. If a house is that bad and has lead, if I DIDNT run from the job, I would tell the client that since Im not a lead remediator, all I would be willing to do is paint right over the lead with no prep.
 

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It's my opinion that high pressure washing of an exterior home is over rated. Particularly, wood exteriors. The main idea of introducing un-wanted water (and subsequent moisture) to a surface being coated, is merely to remove surface contaminates like dirt, dust, salts, and any number of "surface contaminates". This can be achieved with low pressure washing and a number of mild detergents designed for paint preparation. It's not ideal to force a coating off of a substrate just so you can introduce moisture underneath of it.

On the other hand, bare masonry substrates that show signs of deterioration, need aggressive high pressure washing and, or abrasive blasting. prior to a coating system.
 
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