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Nitric acid is great for providing an authentic rustic-antique look on several different wood species without blotching. I’ve never tried it on poplar but have used it on a variety of different pines to mimic antique pumpkin pine. I don’t have any pics to share, but the following video provides a great illustration when used on poplar and other wood species. The solutions I used were much stronger than those in the video….and yes @ Holland, I’m still alive.

 

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Nitric acid is great for providing an authentic rustic-antique look on several different wood species without blotching. I’ve never tried on on poplar but have used it on a variety of different pines to mimic antique pumpkin pine. I don’t have any pics to share, but the following video provides a great illustration when used on poplar and other wood species. The solutions I used were much stronger than those in the video….and yes @ Holland, I’m still alive.

WOW thank you. Have been looking to replicate this for ages and havn't found the right solution. Thanks.
 

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Nitric acid is great for providing an authentic rustic-antique look on several different wood species without blotching. I’ve never tried on on poplar but have used it on a variety of different pines to mimic antique pumpkin pine. I don’t have any pics to share, but the following video provides a great illustration when used on poplar and other wood species. The solutions I used were much stronger than those in the video….and yes @ Holland, I’m still alive.

great info.
 

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Nitric Acid should be mixed and used with EXTREME CAUTION! Preferably, nitric acid should be used outside with the wind at your back, wearing proper gloves and face shield. This is another treatment I will not be using any time soon! If you are thinking of trying this, as the video, above, notes: add the acid to the water, NOT the water to the acid!!!!
 

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great info.
I didn’t get back to you on the post regarding mixed species and matching old to new before having edited it…the only challenge when using chemical dying procedures with mixed species are varying chemical compositions within the wood which render different results…so there’s no one particular chemical that fits all situations…there are other options to artificially aging wood such as lye, washing soda, direct application of ammonium hydroxide, NA, PD, and others. It requires a bit of trial and error, so in short, yes it can be done, but it would require quite a bit of trial & error, and as a result, it would be impossible to provide a solution for your particular scenario. I have however been there and done that on numerous occasions, particularly on restorations of architecturally significant homes where the clients wanted a period look without the use of modern stains & dyes when matching old to new.
 

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I didn’t get back to you on the post regarding mixed species and matching old to new before having edited it…the only challenge when using chemical dying procedures with mixed species are varying chemical compositions within the wood which render different results…so there’s no one particular chemical that fits all situations…there are other options to artificially aging wood such as lye, washing soda, direct application of ammonium hydroxide, NA, PD, and others. It requires a bit of trial and error, so in short, yes it can be done, but it would require quite a bit of trial & error, and as a result, it would be impossible to provide a solution for your particular scenario. I have however been there and done that on numerous occasions, particularly on restorations of architecturally significant homes where the clients wanted a period look without the use of modern stains & dyes when matching old to new.
...my question veered a bit off the original topic, so I edited it, but thank you for the response.

Do your think the wood continues to "darken and amber" after treating it? If so, do you nail the color when staining in a situation where you are matching aged new wood with old wood, or do you under-shoot it? Thoughts?
Probably depends on what is being used, but would appreciate hearing your thoughts.
 
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