Professional Painting Contractors Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I landed on this site yesterday after googling japan drier and oil. my current job entails repainting a kitchen table and 3 stools. what i learned from the thread i read was disturbing... rustoleum paint and japan drier apparently don't play well together! the worst part is, the HO didn't choose rustoleum for its anti rust properties, it was the only brand home depot had in high gloss. should i return the japan drier and get acetone?
She wants a black high gloss finish that wasn't happening with the latex she initially purchased.
I'd appreciate any input y'all can give me at this point whilst i sand the latex off from my 1st attempt!:vs_mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,937 Posts
yes, use a little acetone instead of japan drier. rustoleum is a great product. It doesnt need to be for rust prevention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,937 Posts
no. Fingernail polish remover has other chemicals in it. use FP as a cleaner, not to thin paint. Like everything else... As an actual thinner, use the real thing... use the knock offs as cleaners. That goes for low odor mineral spirits too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,397 Posts
My question is why do you need the Japan Drier? It's not as good at making paint dry faster as you would think. Rustoleum tends to dry fairly quickly as it is so I wouldn't even use the Japan Drier. Keep the air moving so you don't blow dust into the finish. That is the best way to make RO dry quicker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
My question is why do you need the Japan Drier? It's not as good at making paint dry faster as you would think. Rustoleum tends to dry fairly quickly as it is so I wouldn't even use the Japan Drier. Keep the air moving so you don't blow dust into the finish. That is the best way to make RO dry quicker.
The only time I ever found Japan Drier useful was when I did a rat trail in a huge commercial freezer when the temperature was @ 30-somehing and closing. Worked great! Otherwise, why hurry?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
The problem Rustoleum and the modern oils have is they tend to not level too well, due to the lower VOC content. They only say to use acetone to thin as acetone is VOC exempt, not because it's the best. You could use regular mineral spirits and Penetrol, then it would flow out the best. Having played with brush on Rustoleum on a lot of stuff, the upside is a thick coat, but the downside is unless you're careful with everything it's still not gonna level totally brush mark or roller stipple free unless it's highly thinned and you have good technique. Also reeks. It's best left for actual metal finishing, preferably outdoors. I even did side by side with the old High Gloss Muralo Ultra on two pieces of trim and the old Muralo Ultra actually leveled better, smoother, and had the same hardness as Rustoleum without smelling awful.

You might ironically get better results using their rattlecans, with a 2 in 1 filler primer as a base coat wetsanded down, then their high gloss 2X paint.

This is not apples to apples as it is being used on a car, but I painted my car similarly, and wish I did the same to my own personal furniture pieces instead of brushing them out with oil.

Of course if you have a gun, you can just thin it to your heart's content/to where it sprays properly and have at it, there's plenty of automotive jobs done that way as well on a budget, like this
If you want it really good you could wait until it dries, then wetsand it with 2000-3000 grit and polish/compound it with rubbing compound/wax until it's a mirror-like finish like an OEM car.

Where Japan Drier has the advantage is it doesn't really cause it to dry faster, but it acts more like catalyst and allows it to reach full hardness sooner. It sort of converts oil to something slightly like a 2K paint. I don't even know if you can buy Japan Drier in VOC states anymore, all the local stores near me have is Majic Paints Drier, which is somewhat like Japan Drier but not quite. Majic is another company sold at Tractor Supply that makes oil based paint, but their paint is weirdly vegetable oil based, and more or less needs their own drier to work properly. People also use that for similar vehicle projects, but I think the Majic Drier works with Rusto.

Anyway, I think you'd have better luck using the rattlecans and prepping everything similar to the first video I showed if you don't have a gun setup, than trying to brush or roll it out. The video dude tends to spray heavy as he's skilled enough to do so, it's better imo to do a tack coat, and then 3 light/medium coats after if you're not a good sprayer.

Otherwise if spraying is for whatever reason not an option, you'd probably be better off with BIN primer + Benjamin Moore Advance as a top coat, as modern Rustoleum takes a decent amount of time to reach full cure, and doesn't really level great without a ton of thinning, and you don't have to deal with the cleanup and fumes of oil. With my own pieces I've had better luck personally with that vs real oil (actually, I liked Muralo Ultra most, but that's a separate discussion.) BM Advance allows normal water to thin it per the spec sheet, and the times I've done it with just a splash in the cut cup it worked out fine, much better to clean everything and thin with water, even if the initial cost is $5 more a quart and about $10-20 more a gallon.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
129 Posts
The problem Rustoleum and the modern oils have is they tend to not level too well, due to the lower VOC content. They only say to use acetone to thin as acetone is VOC exempt, not because it's the best. You could use regular mineral spirits and Penetrol, then it would flow out the best. Having played with brush on Rustoleum on a lot of stuff, the upside is a thick coat, but the downside is unless you're careful with everything it's still not gonna level totally brush mark or roller stipple free unless it's highly thinned and you have good technique. Also reeks. It's best left for actual metal finishing, preferably outdoors. I even did side by side with the old High Gloss Muralo Ultra on two pieces of trim and the old Muralo Ultra actually leveled better, smoother, and had the same hardness as Rustoleum without smelling awful.

You might ironically get better results using their rattlecans, with a 2 in 1 filler primer as a base coat wetsanded down, then their high gloss 2X paint.

Cheap Rust Oleum DIY spray can paint job you can do for $65 or less! - YouTube
This is not apples to apples as it is being used on a car, but I painted my car similarly, and wish I did the same to my own personal furniture pieces instead of brushing them out with oil.

Of course if you have a gun, you can just thin it to your heart's content/to where it sprays properly and have at it, there's plenty of automotive jobs done that way as well on a budget, like this Best $50 Rustoleum paint job - YouTube If you want it really good you could wait until it dries, then wetsand it with 2000-3000 grit and polish/compound it with rubbing compound/wax until it's a mirror-like finish like an OEM car.

Where Japan Drier has the advantage is it doesn't really cause it to dry faster, but it acts more like catalyst and allows it to reach full hardness sooner. It sort of converts oil to something slightly like a 2K paint. I don't even know if you can buy Japan Drier in VOC states anymore, all the local stores near me have is Majic Paints Drier, which is somewhat like Japan Drier but not quite. Majic is another company sold at Tractor Supply that makes oil based paint, but their paint is weirdly vegetable oil based, and more or less needs their own drier to work properly. People also use that for similar vehicle projects, but I think the Majic Drier works with Rusto.

Anyway, I think you'd have better luck using the rattlecans and prepping everything similar to the first video I showed if you don't have a gun setup, than trying to brush or roll it out. The video dude tends to spray heavy as he's skilled enough to do so, it's better imo to do a tack coat, and then 3 light/medium coats after if you're not a good sprayer.

Otherwise if spraying is for whatever reason not an option, you'd probably be better off with BIN primer + Benjamin Moore Advance as a top coat, as modern Rustoleum takes a decent amount of time to reach full cure, and doesn't really level great without a ton of thinning, and you don't have to deal with the cleanup and fumes of oil. With my own pieces I've had better luck personally with that vs real oil (actually, I liked Muralo Ultra most, but that's a separate discussion.) BM Advance allows normal water to thin it per the spec sheet, and the times I've done it with just a splash in the cut cup it worked out fine, much better to clean everything and thin with water, even if the initial cost is $5 more a quart and about $10-20 more a gallon.
Very interesting and very informative post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Very interesting and very informative post.
By coats with the rattlecans, to clarify, I mean passes, not "coats" as in a dried coat that you're coating over. You're doing it all in one coat in the terminology we use as house painters. With rattlecans due to the solvents, likely mainly acetone for VOC rules (which works as a paint remover...) if you spray over a dried coat of rattlecan paint again without a primer over it, you can make it crinkle up from the acetone stripping the prior layer of paint in some cases, especially if it's not cured for a long time. You can also even run into this using Rustoleum brushed on thinned with acetone, I've had the factory coating (may have been water based DTM?) lift up brushing Rustoleum thinned with acetone on baseboard heaters.

EDIT:
Another thing too is to control for weather/ambient conditions. With the cars like that, you'll often see clearly rattlecanned cars driving around, with giant streaks/etc and splotches. That's from the surface being too hot and the paint basically drying as it's being put on. You want somewhat high humidity, cool weather/a cool area indoors, and no direct sunlight, if you must do it outdoors it's better to do it near dusk for this reason. It obviously works the same somewhat when brushing and rolling a house exterior, if you paint in direct sun the paint will pull and dry on your brush fast. So don't paint a big table black in high noon in direct sun, or in a super well heated and dry garage (though if it's too cold you can get runs) you want a Goldilocks zone of about 50-70F and some humidity, ideally.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
129 Posts
By coats with the rattlecans, to clarify, I mean passes, not "coats" as in a dried coat that you're coating over. You're doing it all in one coat in the terminology we use as house painters. With rattlecans due to the solvents, likely mainly acetone for VOC rules (which works as a paint remover...) if you spray over a dried coat of rattlecan paint again without a primer over it, you can make it crinkle up from the acetone stripping the prior layer of paint in some cases, especially if it's not cured for a long time. You can also even run into this using Rustoleum brushed on thinned with acetone, I've had the factory coating (may have been water based DTM?) lift up brushing Rustoleum thinned with acetone on baseboard heaters.

EDIT:
Another thing too is to control for weather/ambient conditions. With the cars like that, you'll often see clearly rattlecanned cars driving around, with giant streaks/etc and splotches. That's from the surface being too hot and the paint basically drying as it's being put on. You want somewhat high humidity, cool weather/a cool area indoors, and no direct sunlight, if you must do it outdoors it's better to do it near dusk for this reason. It obviously works the same somewhat when brushing and rolling a house exterior, if you paint in direct sun the paint will pull and dry on your brush fast. So don't paint a big table black in high noon in direct sun, or in a super well heated and dry garage (though if it's too cold you can get runs) you want a Goldilocks zone of about 50-70F and some humidity, ideally.
I'm glad you clarified the coats and passes thing.
Also funny you mentioned "crinkle up" thing, because that's what actually happened to me few days ago when I was spraying black gloss Rustoleum oil on a piece of bare wood railing.

I sprayed(outside) the wood railing before attaching it to the posts.
First coat -left it to dry over night-, and the next day second coat, and it developed that "crinkle up" effect in one spot.
At the time I wished I sprayed some of that paint into a container and applied with a brush.
But from what you said brushing that paint is not as 'easy' if it's not thinned.
Tho maybe in the spray formula is not as thick as is in the can. (I'm sure it's not).
It's not a high end project but I will go and give a light sanding and recoated.
Maybe I acctually will try applying it with the brush, just to see how it goes.

I have some of the original BM alkyd IMPERVO in black high-gloss left, but it was too good of a product to use for that project, so I got the Rustoleum.

I'm glad you shared your experience with Rustoleum. Thank you very much.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
With brushing, I wouldn't exactly say it's awful, just the OP sounded like a newer painter without a lot of experience. To be fair that is similar to me when I started out and did a few projects with brushed oil. It doesn't brush badly, in fact the satin when I used it brushed about as nice as SW Proclassic oil. I just think for something like tables and chairs it might not be the best choice in 2020. I still prefer to brush metal railings even though it takes longer, as the thicker coats give more protection than rattlecanning it. Easy or hard is relative with any paint brushing or rolling it out, as you'll see here on PT with different preferences and experiences for everyone with every paint under the sun. I just think personally there's better options in a lot of scenarios, but you will apply way more mils for sure if you brush it or roll it out unless you thin it like water. You also still have the long dry and cure times, and more propensity to run and sag when brushed out, and I find even BM Advance is more user friendly in those regards than real deal oil, without dealing with clean up, thinning, smell, etc.

In the rattlecans, I think it's an entirely different formula, and it's thin as water in the cans. But I've even crinkled up paint in non-rattlecan form brushed on, though I thinned it with acetone, it was after getting the newer lower VOC formula in my state. I never had it happen with the older versions brushing it.

I had a few awful experiences with VOC compliant Cover Stain, too. I'm at the point where I think the VOC rules made oils mostly impractical to use now except in really limited scenarios. All the good solvents and mineral spirits had to be taken out and replaced with acetone or in some cases really nasty VOC exempt ones, like Cover Stain uses a very awful smelling dry cleaning solvent of some sort now and smells even crazier than before.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_drying_agent
Article about Japan Drier, btw.

For rattlecans, btw, I really LOVE the Rustoleum 2 in 1 filler primer. It's amazing, sands like a dream and adheres well. Also prevents the crinkling up if you're going over another prior rattlecan paint job. On a hotter day it can be wetsanded in an hour or so.

EDIT:
For the crinkle problem, in the first video I showed he ends up respraying his car for that reason. It prior to him getting it had 1-2 rattlecan jobs on it, and he sprayed it with just the paint alone and no primer. He ended up getting a lot of crinkle in some spots, then he had to resand the car down, and use the 2 in 1 filler primer over it, then wet sand that, then top coat.

EDIT 2:
Another good tip for the rattlecans is besides making sure you do give them the full 2 minute shake, putting them in a bucket of hot water for 3-4 minutes really helps thin the paint out even more in the can, and will make the paint lay out even smoother.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,638 Posts
I have some of the original BM alkyd IMPERVO in black high-gloss left, but it was too good of a product to use for that project, so I got the Rustoleum.

I'm glad you shared your experience with Rustoleum. Thank you very much.

Use BM P22 or p23, will not wrinkle undercoats...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
129 Posts
With brushing, I wouldn't exactly say it's awful, just the OP sounded like a newer painter without a lot of experience. To be fair that is similar to me when I started out and did a few projects with brushed oil. It doesn't brush badly, in fact the satin when I used it brushed about as nice as SW Proclassic oil. I just think for something like tables and chairs it might not be the best choice in 2020. I still prefer to brush metal railings even though it takes longer, as the thicker coats give more protection than rattlecanning it. Easy or hard is relative with any paint brushing or rolling it out, as you'll see here on PT with different preferences and experiences for everyone with every paint under the sun. I just think personally there's better options in a lot of scenarios, but you will apply way more mils for sure if you brush it or roll it out unless you thin it like water. You also still have the long dry and cure times, and more propensity to run and sag when brushed out, and I find even BM Advance is more user friendly in those regards than real deal oil, without dealing with clean up, thinning, smell, etc.

In the rattlecans, I think it's an entirely different formula, and it's thin as water in the cans. But I've even crinkled up paint in non-rattlecan form brushed on, though I thinned it with acetone, it was after getting the newer lower VOC formula in my state. I never had it happen with the older versions brushing it.

I had a few awful experiences with VOC compliant Cover Stain, too. I'm at the point where I think the VOC rules made oils mostly impractical to use now except in really limited scenarios. All the good solvents and mineral spirits had to be taken out and replaced with acetone or in some cases really nasty VOC exempt ones, like Cover Stain uses a very awful smelling dry cleaning solvent of some sort now and smells even crazier than before.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_drying_agent
Article about Japan Drier, btw.

For rattlecans, btw, I really LOVE the Rustoleum 2 in 1 filler primer. It's amazing, sands like a dream and adheres well. Also prevents the crinkling up if you're going over another prior rattlecan paint job. On a hotter day it can be wetsanded in an hour or so.

EDIT:
For the crinkle problem, in the first video I showed he ends up respraying his car for that reason. It prior to him getting it had 1-2 rattlecan jobs on it, and he sprayed it with just the paint alone and no primer. He ended up getting a lot of crinkle in some spots, then he had to resand the car down, and use the 2 in 1 filler primer over it, then wet sand that, then top coat.

EDIT 2:
Another good tip for the rattlecans is besides making sure you do give them the full 2 minute shake, putting them in a bucket of hot water for 3-4 minutes really helps thin the paint out even more in the can, and will make the paint lay out even smoother.
Agrees, Advance looks great if you catch all the runs,lol.
But the dry time (and the cure time), is way too long for most projects.
I used it few times, nice looking finish, and yes, the water clean up is a big plus.

So you think that rattle/spray cans have thicker formula than the quart or gallon cans..?
I was under impression that it would be the other way around. But what do I know...Lol.

What was the problem with the new formulated Cover Stain.
I read here that some painters stopped using Bullseye 123 primer because formula was changed and is a crappy product now.
I tend not to use all-purpose primers. I rather use dedicated primers that are designed for a specific tasks.
Less chance for failure.

Good to know about the R 2in1 primer.

I have to admit that I didn't watch the car painting video, (since I'm not into that work), but I will watch it to pick up some tips that I can apply to other projects.

Interesting tip on hot water treatment for the spraycans.
I do that sometimes with quarts, but was thinking that hot (or even warm) water would create some extra pressure inside of spraycan.
But from what you are saying it will not and it's safe.

Yes, rattling them for two minutes it's not fun at all.
When I'm rattling them outside I look around for people checking if there is some kid getting ready to tag the walls....hahaha

Thanks again for good tips.

.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
129 Posts
Use BM P22 or p23, will not wrinkle undercoats...
Good to know.
I looked at the spec sheet and there is nothing about using on wood.
What's you opinion on it.

Dry time (2 hours to touch) is impressive, (8 to recoat means next day on most jobs), but no mention about cure time, (or did I miss that in the tech spec sheet).

https://media.benjaminmoore.com/Web...tasheets/TDS_0P22/20180802 P22 TDS US OKF.pdf

Quote:
"Painted surfaces can be washed after two weeks. High
humidity and cool temperatures will result in longer dry,
recoat and cure times."

Maybe the two weeks washing time is the indicator of cure time?

Also I found this. Guy is talking about cure time (3 weeks). Post is from 2019, so the formula must be current.
https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/anyone-use-bm-p22-over-p06-alkyd-enamel.76503/


Thank you, coco for your tips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Agrees, Advance looks great if you catch all the runs,lol.
But the dry time (and the cure time), is way too long for most projects.
I used it few times, nice looking finish, and yes, the water clean up is a big plus.

So you think that rattle/spray cans have thicker formula than the quart or gallon cans..?
I was under impression that it would be the other way around. But what do I know...Lol.

What was the problem with the new formulated Cover Stain.
I read here that some painters stopped using Bullseye 123 primer because formula was changed and is a crappy product now.
I tend not to use all-purpose primers. I rather use dedicated primers that are designed for a specific tasks.
Less chance for failure.

Good to know about the R 2in1 primer.

I have to admit that I didn't watch the car painting video, (since I'm not into that work), but I will watch it to pick up some tips that I can apply to other projects.

Interesting tip on hot water treatment for the spraycans.
I do that sometimes with quarts, but was thinking that hot (or even warm) water would create some extra pressure inside of spraycan.
But from what you are saying it will not and it's safe.

Yes, rattling them for two minutes it's not fun at all.
When I'm rattling them outside I look around for people checking if there is some kid getting ready to tag the walls....hahaha

Thanks again for good tips.

.
No no, the quarts/gallons have a way thicker formula, sorry if I wasn't clear. The cans if you spray them in a cup or punch them open are like water, though.

I've had it create a bubble on the bottom of the can if you do it too long or use super hot water, but I guess it would depend on ambient conditions where the can was stored. The bubble didn't bother me personally as I'd be using an entire can completely with a car fender/etc, and I could let out the excess gas from the can after I'm done. But definitely don't do it if you plan to not use up the whole can in one go.

I think with brushing Rusto if you're used to Advance and can brush it out, you'll probably be OK, but Rusto has even more tendency to run/sag and do all the negative behaviors of Advance just with harder cleanup and more smell. It's basically overnight to touch at all, and 24-48 hours to handle, then maybe a week to get hard to not fingernail the surface. (Depends on how hot it is, a black metal railing in the sun will cure faster than a file cabinet in a cold garage.) You get a slightly harder and smoother finish, but it's almost imperceptible and to me personally not worth using that often now, except for price, which is basically false economy due to price of thinner, brushes, etc. I still definitely like it for "maintenance" type painting of severely rusty metal with a brush, for say, railings, heaters, and all that kind of stuff where spraying would be impractical (ie, don't want to mask off everything to spray one rusty bathroom baseboard heater) but I just personally wouldn't use it brushed/rolled for furniture now (though if the furniture is very beat and can't be fully restored, it's worth it I guess, to just cover it with a coating that is durable, strong, and cheap.)

My Cover Stain issue was actually possibly due to using it a bit too lightly coated on (I ran a 3/8 microfiber but it left probably not enough mils...) to cover grease stains on a wall, but they bled through to the top coat. It also got even more ropey with the lower VOC version. Main thing was the smell, I used to be able to use it indoors without coughing/etc, now it's so bad my eyes are burning and I'm coughing even with a 3M carbon filter respirator. Original Kilz didn't do any of those negative things and blocked said oil stains. Obviously original Kilz still smelled like oil primer, but the Cover Stain just smells so awful now it's pretty much unusable indoors under any circumstances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,638 Posts
Good to know.
I looked at the spec sheet and there is nothing about using on wood.
What's you opinion on it.

Dry time (2 hours to touch) is impressive, (8 to recoat means next day on most jobs), but no mention about cure time, (or did I miss that in the tech spec sheet).

https://media.benjaminmoore.com/Web...tasheets/TDS_0P22/20180802 P22 TDS US OKF.pdf

Quote:
"Painted surfaces can be washed after two weeks. High
humidity and cool temperatures will result in longer dry,
recoat and cure times."

Maybe the two weeks washing time is the indicator of cure time?

Also I found this. Guy is talking about cure time (3 weeks). Post is from 2019, so the formula must be current.
https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/anyone-use-bm-p22-over-p06-alkyd-enamel.76503/


Thank you, coco for your tips.

The hobby-machinist is just incorrect. If he doesn't want a 2-3 week full cure then don't use oil simple as that. That's just the most obvious thing I have ever heard. He should be using 2K poly or epoxy if cure time is the only thing important.


That said, p22 being a urethane base will cure harder and faster than a traditional linseed alkyd enamel. Due to VOC laws manufacturers can't spec a lot of these coatings on wood but for all purposes the product is the same as the old C112 porch and floor enamel and M22 urethane alkyd. We have used it many times on wood no problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
The hobby-machinist is just incorrect. If he doesn't want a 2-3 week full cure then don't use oil simple as that. That's just the most obvious thing I have ever heard. He should be using 2K poly or epoxy if cure time is the only thing important.


That said, p22 being a urethane base will cure harder and faster than a traditional linseed alkyd enamel. Due to VOC laws manufacturers can't spec a lot of these coatings on wood but for all purposes the product is the same as the old C112 porch and floor enamel and M22 urethane alkyd. We have used it many times on wood no problems.
My father told me back in the 90s at his machine shop he worked at, the go to paint for all the machines and basically everything was Benjamin Moore Porch and Floor, presumably the oil based one. He seemed to think it was pretty strong and held up well.

I will definitely try this out over Rusto in the future, just having a tintable base will make it worthwhile compared to Rusto where the tintable base is hard to find.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,638 Posts
My father told me back in the 90s at his machine shop he worked at, the go to paint for all the machines and basically everything was Benjamin Moore Porch and Floor, presumably the oil based one. He seemed to think it was pretty strong and held up well.

I will definitely try this out over Rusto in the future, just having a tintable base will make it worthwhile compared to Rusto where the tintable base is hard to find.
The old porch and floor was basically a relabel of M22.


Yes P22 comes in a quite a few stock colors and all tint bases. You can make some nice reds using a bit of magenta into stock safety red for example... Alternatively BM also makes V200 or rust scat.


Being urethane base it is non chalking on exterior.


Corotech also has a Isocyanate catalyst you can add to oil enamels.
V705
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
129 Posts
The hobby-machinist is just incorrect. If he doesn't want a 2-3 week full cure then don't use oil simple as that. That's just the most obvious thing I have ever heard. He should be using 2K poly or epoxy if cure time is the only thing important.


That said, p22 being a urethane base will cure harder and faster than a traditional linseed alkyd enamel. Due to VOC laws manufacturers can't spec a lot of these coatings on wood but for all purposes the product is the same as the old C112 porch and floor enamel and M22 urethane alkyd. We have used it many times on wood no problems.
Thank you for your comments, coco
Makes sense as to the hobby-machinist. He is using wrong paints.
Glad to know that BM P22 could be used on wood.
BM P22 not specifying for wood made me wonder.
I know that some alkyd paints, (like one type of Rustoluem that I saw), it said on the label "For metal only".
I asked about it and was informed that that particular alkyd paint was not as flexible like some other alkyd paints are but is tougher on the surface.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,638 Posts
Thank you for your comments, coco
Makes sense as to the hobby-machinist. He is using wrong paints.
Glad to know that BM P22 could be used on wood.
BM P22 not specifying for wood made me wonder.
I know that some alkyd paints, (like one type of Rustoluem that I saw), it said on the label "For metal only".
I asked about it and was informed that that particular alkyd paint was not as flexible like some other alkyd paints are but is tougher on the surface.

That is true, however these urethane alkyd enamels have been used on wood for decades before VOC laws changed to require the label say metal only.
http://www2.benjaminmoore.com/Downl...Id=BEA+Repository/16309/data_sheet_file_en_US
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top