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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We sealed a deck with Rymar that we had also sealed 3 years ago with Rymar. The deck is on the second floor. There are areas that are bleeding sap now and the homeowner thinks it is our fault somehow.

Since the wood was dry and the coating looks fine everywhere else, is there any way to remove the sap? We scraped it and touched up, but the sap keeps oozing from the heartwood/ knotty areas. I believe the deck is just regular pressure treated wood. Why would the deck start oozing sap now IF it had not done much of that previously? I really do not see how this could be our fault in anyway, but who knows.
 

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From what I understand sap comes out more after the wood has aged a bit and shows up more where the wood is in a lot of sun during the day.

After you scraped up the sap, did you try a rag with turpentine? The HO will probably have to wipe up the sap a couple of times per year until the pitch pockets run dry. (not sure how many seasons it will take)

The pressure treated wood probably wasn't kiln dried to solidify the sap. Or if it was kiln dried it did not get fired hot enough to harden the sap.
Not in any way your fault.
 

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Almost Gone
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yeah, i had a deck like this, this year. You can't really stop it, not until its run its course. I would say since your customer is emo and blames you, try to find some resource online or otherwise that can get you off the hook with some credibility to the HO.
 

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There is nothing you can do.. it won't stop. The boards need to be replaced. I've noticed deep penetrating oils make the problem worse.
 

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Paintist
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You can try using a solvent to clean it up but it won't necessarly stop the sap. It's not your fault or the HO, its just the piece of wood. You can try flipping the board over and hope that side doesn't ooze or else it needs to be replaced.
 

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Paint Store Owner
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If you powerwashed before you sealed this year, sometimes the washing can activate the sap ooze. Turps, Xylene, or Laquer thinner should cut it and remove it, only problem, it could cut the finish too, so you may have to touch up some areas. My parents deck has been bleeding sap fo 9 years in different areas. Its pretty much up to the wood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I returning her call yesterday and left a message she has not called back yet. It has been one of those weeks here. Crazy customer complaint, lacquer popping off stairway on another job, some weeks just it just is not worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yep. Just had a couple pine trees cut out of my yard this week that dropped big blobs of sap all over the place. I suppose that is my fault as well. Probably watered the lawn too much.

The HO is going to get a second opinion on the sap now. With my luck, she will find some scum bag that thinks they can now shoot her a high price to fix the deck that she can then try to get me to pay for. We will see. So far, I have the opinions of the board here, other painters, Rymar tech support, and my paint reps on my side. What a hassle for a quick and easy deck reseal.
 

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This happened to us. The customer was pissed. We stained the deck while they were on vacation. They returned and I informed them that there was sap bleeding before we even started. They wondered why I did not call them (imagine interrupting their vacation to tell them that there was sap on the deck!). Anyway I sent them this article (the link is dead so I posted it below). They still think that it was my fault. Long story short he played for the Patriots and I was glad when he was finally cut.

Deck Maintenance for Pressure Treated Wood

Q. I have a deck that was constructed from pressure
treated wood. The deck is about 8-10 years old. I have
lived in the house for 6-7 years. The former owners
never waterproofed the deck or cleaned it. Since I
have been living here, I have been cleaning the wood
and waterproofing it although I do not use any stain.
I have not waterproofed it every year because I
thought the finish would build up. Each spring I check
to see whether water still beads up and let that be my
guide. For the last couple of years I have noticed a
lot of sap on some of the boards. I try to scrape it
when I clean the deck in the spring, but it continues
to seep out throughout the summer and is rather
sticky. I did not notice this happening the first few
years. Is there anything I can do about this problem?
The sap does limit the use of the deck.

A. The "sap" oozing from your deck boards is a natural
product of the wood, and it’s really pitch, not sap.
Sap runs in the spring. Running pitch has nothing to
do with stains, sealers, or waterproofing the deck. It
resides in "pitch pockets" in wood, and when the wood
gets hot enough, it melts and runs out. This is
especially true of lumber made from conifers, which
have large pitch pockets. Your deck wood is probably
made of a member of this species, perhaps southern
pine.

You’re most likely to notice pitch problems on the
sunny areas of the deck than in shaded sections, as
those are the areas on the deck that absorb the most
heat. Kiln dried lumber that has been heated to more
than 160 degrees usually does not suffer from this
problem. The high kiln temperature solidifies the
pitch and prevents it from turning to liquid again.
Evidently, the pressure treated lumber used on your
deck was either not kiln dried, or wasn’t dried at a
high enough temperature to cause this solidification.

There’s not a lot you can do about the problem at this
point except live with it. As the deck heats up in the
summer, pitch will continue to run from the boards.
There is no sealer made that can contain it under
these conditions. But the news is not all bad. There’s
really no need to let the sticky pitch ruin your
enjoyment of the deck. A bit of turpentine on a rag
will remove it quickly, and you shouldn’t have to wipe
it up more than a couple of times a summer.
Eventually, the pitch pockets will run dry, and you
won’t even have to do this minor maintenance chore.
.
 

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Rock On
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Sap bleed is a substrate issue, it's almost never (unless you coat particular bare woods too early) an applications issue

Obviously this is not the case here...time and previous applications eliminates that

It's not your fault...it's the substrate
 

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Almost Gone
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10,730 Posts
I guess the 20,000 pound elephant in the room is you could always replace the troubled board(s). Of course then that takes money, etc...
 
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