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I'm not questioning if Duration works or not......I'm old school and prime bare wood, but can you tell me how many years you have observed Duration applied over raw or bare wood?

Would you paint new wood siding (say T-111) with it without priming?

Just curious.
Ive observed Duration now for about 6-7 years which is about how long ago it came out. Its done great with NO problems. Yes redwood, cedar, and water stains still need a straight prime. I also would probably prime completely new and bare wood but dont have that type of job too often. I like Duration for the older houses that we scrape and have some paint and some bare wood, does great.
 

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Ive observed Duration now for about 6-7 years which is about how long ago it came out. Its done great with NO problems. Yes redwood, cedar, and water stains still need a straight prime. I also would probably prime completely new and bare wood but dont have that type of job too often. I like Duration for the older houses that we scrape and have some paint and some bare wood, does great.
Thanks! Never used it and was just wondering. Did it take some getting use to applying "paint' over bare wood?
 

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I've been painting 30 years and always used oil primer intil now. I don't care if it's bare wood Duration will stick and hold with no problems. Cuts your time in half.
That I disagree with. In half?

It still needs two coats(spot priming). You still need a seal/primer coat and a finish coat. It is designed to do 2 top coats in one coat but needs to be primed.

I would rather use a primer designed to seal and then a thick coat of duration. There is cuts the job (after priming) almost in half.
 

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That I disagree with. In half?

It still needs two coats(spot priming). You still need a seal/primer coat and a finish coat. It is designed to do 2 top coats in one coat but needs to be primed.

I would rather use a primer designed to seal and then a thick coat of duration. There is cuts the job (after priming) almost in half.
You are still gonna have to spot prime with Duration in many applications, especially with gloss.
 

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That I disagree with. In half?

It still needs two coats(spot priming). You still need a seal/primer coat and a finish coat. It is designed to do 2 top coats in one coat but needs to be primed.

I would rather use a primer designed to seal and then a thick coat of duration. There is cuts the job (after priming) almost in half.
No, it is designed to prime and paint in one with twice the mil thickness as other paints.
 

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Thanks! Never used it and was just wondering. Did it take some getting use to applying "paint' over bare wood?
Good question, I guess thats why I dont have so much of a problem with using Duration over bare wood in the first place. It came out shortly after I started painting and didnt have it ingrained in my head that I HAD to oil prime all bare wood. It is gooood stuff. The only time I dont use it is if I need a really smooth look. I use super paint for doors,etc.
 

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Good question, I guess thats why I dont have so much of a problem with using Duration over bare wood in the first place. It came out shortly after I started painting and didnt have it ingrained in my head that I HAD to oil prime all bare wood. It is gooood stuff. The only time I dont use it is if I need a really smooth look. I use super paint for doors,etc.
I am sure glad my Dad hammered it into my head to oil prime redwood, cedar, prime over previous oil stained wood and varnish, log oil. i wouldn't have had so many thankful customers. glad I listened. sorry, but for those cases, you need a primer.
 
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