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When you see a paint sample strip that has 4-6 colors on it that seem to be gradations of "shade," is there actually any rule of thumb for the percentage difference between the "shades?" I'm getting a lot of customers lately who pick a primary color for a room and then ask me to paint an "accent" wall "one shade darker." My paint store guys kinda shrug their shoulders and tell me they can do like 25% or 50% of any color on a strip....but the result doesn't usually end up being close to the next color up on the sample strip. I'm thinking that "shade" is subjective and the customer must do final approval of what I might suggest to be "one shade darker." Do any of you use the 25% darker or lighter rule?
 

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When you see a paint sample strip that has 4-6 colors on it that seem to be gradations of "shade," is there actually any rule of thumb for the percentage difference between the "shades?" I'm getting a lot of customers lately who pick a primary color for a room and then ask me to paint an "accent" wall "one shade darker." My paint store guys kinda shrug their shoulders and tell me they can do like 25% or 50% of any color on a strip....but the result doesn't usually end up being close to the next color up on the sample strip. I'm thinking that "shade" is subjective and the customer must do final approval of what I might suggest to be "one shade darker." Do any of you use the 25% darker or lighter rule?
There is a formula they do use, if you are good at math then you should be able to answer your question with the following equation.

Pat
 

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P&D Trainer & Assessor
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It is not that simple to just put less or more colorants and end up with a colour difference.

First things first though, the term shade relates to the value of the colour as follows:
  • shade - to darken the value of a colour by adding black.
  • Tint - to lighten the value of the colour by adding white
  • value - the light reflectivness of a colour, white being more light reflective and black not reflective at all and grey somewhere inbetween.

The changes in a colour card are usually the chroma of a colour or its saturation.

The base of the paint has a big impact in the amount of colorants added to a colour. For example the first few colours on a sheet could be off a white base meaning it has more titanium dioxide. The deeper colours could be of a deep or neutral base having less titanium dioxide and even sometimes the base could be factory colour.

Colour is a science and it is not as simple as just adjusting how much colorant we use.

You may find this video that I created helpful:

 

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Heidi Nyline
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Here's why you are having a problem:

The sample strips from the paint store do not necessarily change in intensity only. They quite often change in undertone too. One of the worst assumptions a customer (or painter) can make when picking a colour is that the lightest colour on the strip is the "light version" of the darkest colour on the strip.

Don't get me started on how stupid it is for paint companies to do this.

PacificPainter is right about tone, shade and value. Also consider clean vs. dirty in colour.

The only "trick" I can suggest for you is to use the Benjamin Moore Colour Gallery, look up the colour and click on the "See More Shades" button.

Without being a colour expert or really knowing your colours this is going to be your best way to find the darker or lighter shade of a colour. And of course this is only going to work for Benjamin Moore colours but at least you have a resource that is more reliable than the guys at the paint store counter.
 

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SeHablaEspañol
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It is not that simple to just put less or more colorants and end up with a colour difference.

First things first though, the term shade relates to the value of the colour as follows:
  • shade - to darken the value of a colour by adding black.
  • Tint - to lighten the value of the colour by adding white
  • value - the light reflectivness of a colour, white being more light reflective and black not reflective at all and grey somewhere inbetween.

The changes in a colour card are usually the chroma of a colour or its saturation.

The base of the paint has a big impact in the amount of colorants added to a colour. For example the first few colours on a sheet could be off a white base meaning it has more titanium dioxide. The deeper colours could be of a deep or neutral base having less titanium dioxide and even sometimes the base could be factory colour.

Colour is a science and it is not as simple as just adjusting how much colorant we use.

You may find this video that I created helpful:

CPCCPD3005A Match a specified paint colour - YouTube
OMG man, this video is amazing, a lot of complex but useful info about colour, too bad I have a little visual problem if not I would totally get more into it. :yes:
 
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