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Ive heard a lot of people using shellac primer here, which i had never heard of before. Here in Germany shellac is almost only used on old furniture or on musical instruments.

As I gather, north americans use it as a stain blocker, which makes sense given water-soluble stains cant get through alcohol-soluble shellac.

As alcohol is the only solvent in it, it also sounds much more environmentally friendly.

But on Zinsser BINs data sheet it says it does not breathe i.e. has no water vapor permeability.

Is that not a huge problem regarding mold, or expansion/contraction of wood?
or is it just only used on surfaces where this is not an issue?

Im thinking of trying out zinsser bin, thats why im asking.
 

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PinheadsUnite
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BIN is not recommended for overall priming on wood.

I have never had issues with the moisture concerns you mention when using BIN on large PLASTER surfaces. IMO, plaster does need to breathe like wood, AND since the back side of plaster is usually not sealed nor tight against another surface, if any moisture NEEDED to migrate back and forth, it could do so from the back.

If you have a wood ceiling that is stained with nicotine, then to be safe, you may look into other alternatives.
 

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It can be clean with Ammonia and water. Witch is one of the reasons I love it so much. The Zinner brand I have use for a lot of different reasons the biggest is smoke damage, and water stains. I don't like it for nicotine. I have had it bleed through. I know a painter in some rentals that would use it as a finish coat in down and dirty rental kitchen paint for small areas. Three coats and he was don't with it drying so fast he could get it done in one trip.
 

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It can be clean with Ammonia and water. Witch is one of the reasons I love it so much. The Zinner brand I have use for a lot of different reasons the biggest is smoke damage, and water stains. I don't like it for nicotine. I have had it bleed through. I know a painter in some rentals that would use it as a finish coat in down and dirty rental kitchen paint for small areas. Three coats and he was don't with it drying so fast he could get it done in one trip.
I wonder why he didn't switch to white paint for the 3rd coat in his down and dirty system?
 

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You want to paint over it the same day. It doesn't fix all sap bleed every time with 1 coat. Some knots need 2 or 3 coats to stop it. When you put that much on you can get flashing so you'll have to put more coats on and bid accordingly.
 

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Ive heard a lot of people using shellac primer here, which i had never heard of before. Here in Germany shellac is almost only used on old furniture or on musical instruments.

As I gather, north americans use it as a stain blocker, which makes sense given water-soluble stains cant get through alcohol-soluble shellac.

As alcohol is the only solvent in it, it also sounds much more environmentally friendly.

But on Zinsser BINs data sheet it says it does not breathe i.e. has no water vapor permeability.

Is that not a huge problem regarding mold, or expansion/contraction of wood?
or is it just only used on surfaces where this is not an issue?

Im thinking of trying out zinsser bin, thats why im asking.
Hey Brian...

If you've never used shellac before, be aware there is a slight learning curve to the application of shellac vs. oil base or latex coatings. It rolls OK, but is awful thin, so spatter can be a headache...it brushes well & sprays beautiful (as long as you don't put it on too heavy). Shellac also dries fast - very fast. ...And Zinsser BIN is a pigmented shellac (not clear). As chrisn will surely come along and mention, the smell will knock you stupid if you're around 'em too long, but those fumes dissipate fairly quickly - but still make sure you have adequate ventillation during use.

Zinsser BIN is a great primer, sealer and stain-blocker, and works on a greater number of stains than do either oil or latex stain blockers. And, of course, one of the greatest advantages to shellac is that it is a non-reactive coating, requiring only solvent evaporation to thoroughly dry and cure. BIN works great on wood, but better on varnished, or previously painted wood, for the very reasons of vapor transmission that you mentioned earlier. If you apply it to larger wood surfaces, such as doors that may not have been sealed completely, the expansion and contraction of the door will cause the film to craze significantly (but won't lose adhesion). BIN also has advantage on certain substrates because of shellac's phenomenal level of adhesion to glossy, slick surfaces unlike any other resin type, including acrylics.

In my opinion, BIN is still the best product for use in fire restoration and water damage issues. Unfortunately, BIN has suffered in popularity due to rapid price increases, sporadic availability of product, and less expensive stain killing alternatives. Zinsser has just recently introduced a water-borne synthetic shellac that seems to have many of the same characteristics as the regular BIN (without the noxious fumes).

In this industry, contractors seem to either love or hate the product... personally, I think it's a great product for use in difficult areas relating to adhesion or bleeding stain issues. It is probably a little too expensive to use as your everyday, universal primer, though. I have no idea whether that answered, or even addressed, your questions and concerns, but good luck and let us know what you decide to do.
 

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It's not for knots.I tell you not.Does a pretty knotty job of this.I'm a Zinsser fan but lacks hiding power.On todays pine lumber you can spot three to four coats over the knots allowing sufficient drying times and apply a top quality primer and two finish coats and over a short time will rear its ugly head once again! Shellac has it's place but slacks in this department.If it were "knot" so I would tell you.
 

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It's not for knots.I tell you not.Does a pretty knotty job of this.I'm a Zinsser fan but lacks hiding power.On todays pine lumber you can spot three to four coats over the knots allowing sufficient drying times and apply a top quality primer and two finish coats and over a short time will rear its ugly head once again! Shellac has it's place but slacks in this department.If it were "knot" so I would tell you.
Have you found a product that does hide knots on "today's pine lumber?"
 

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Some painter on here a few years back swore by coating knots with Titebond lll.i have tried this by brushing on a few light coats over the knots and so far so good.
Wow. If three coats of Titebond III works, I wonder what one coat of Liquid Nails or the poly PL construction adhesive would do?
 

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Hey Brian...

If you've never used shellac before, be aware there is a slight learning curve to the application of shellac vs. oil base or latex coatings. It rolls OK, but is awful thin, so spatter can be a headache...it brushes well & sprays beautiful (as long as you don't put it on too heavy). Shellac also dries fast - very fast. ...And Zinsser BIN is a pigmented shellac (not clear). As chrisn will surely come along and mention, the smell will knock you stupid if you're around 'em too long, but those fumes dissipate fairly quickly - but still make sure you have adequate ventillation during use.

Zinsser BIN is a great primer, sealer and stain-blocker, and works on a greater number of stains than do either oil or latex stain blockers. And, of course, one of the greatest advantages to shellac is that it is a non-reactive coating, requiring only solvent evaporation to thoroughly dry and cure. BIN works great on wood, but better on varnished, or previously painted wood, for the very reasons of vapor transmission that you mentioned earlier. If you apply it to larger wood surfaces, such as doors that may not have been sealed completely, the expansion and contraction of the door will cause the film to craze significantly (but won't lose adhesion). BIN also has advantage on certain substrates because of shellac's phenomenal level of adhesion to glossy, slick surfaces unlike any other resin type, including acrylics.

In my opinion, BIN is still the best product for use in fire restoration and water damage issues. Unfortunately, BIN has suffered in popularity due to rapid price increases, sporadic availability of product, and less expensive stain killing alternatives. Zinsser has just recently introduced a water-borne synthetic shellac that seems to have many of the same characteristics as the regular BIN (without the noxious fumes).

In this industry, contractors seem to either love or hate the product... personally, I think it's a great product for use in difficult areas relating to adhesion or bleeding stain issues. It is probably a little too expensive to use as your everyday, universal primer, though. I have no idea whether that answered, or even addressed, your questions and concerns, but good luck and let us know what you decide to do.
So when you read a post like this you got to find out more about the guy posting.

You see he's been thanked 106 times in 28 posts. What?

Then you see he's only posted a total of 42 times. Well that's easy enough. I've got an hour to blow.

A total of 2 were a waste of my time. The time he announced he was coming out of retirement, and the time he announced he was going back in.

The other 40?

Life changing. PT at it's best. Click on his name and scroll through yourself. You won't be disappointed. :notworthy:
 
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