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That's very helpful. I applied Gardz to the bare skim coat because it was my understanding that it's great benefit was penetration on the taping compound and hardening/sealing it. Your method definitely makes sense for using it as a base for a top coat. I screwed up and did a bunch of spot priming with Gardz over the Gardz, and now I'm told that's a big no-no.
spot priming takes a couple of minutes and can be painted over after 10 to 15 minutes. you can even spot prime already sealed walls with the paint you are about to use most of the time unless there is accent lighting or something. Half of the problems I'm seeing you guys talk about are probably a result of the guards itself. guards is for sealing down peeling wallpaper and damaged drywall.no need to do it to brand new skimmed walls try not to overthink painting so much. prime the walls with a new drywall primer/sealer, fix the imperfections and nail holes that can be seen, spot prime those patches quick and paint pretty simple.
 

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Maybe wait to see if others will comment on the rolling aspect. Maybe there is some trick to it.
I used two types of roller sleeves , standard nap for rolling walls and seeing no build up I switched to a larger nap, no difference, at least very very little, but not what I was hoping for.

Here is an interesting video.
Tho is addressing different problem with it, bubbling, that I didn't experienced.

Sherwin Williams High Build Primer Fail.
Do not use Sherwin Williams High Build primer for roll on applications.
Apparently this specific primer is for spray on application only.
This little nugget of knowledge would’ve been handy to know when i went in to “Ask Sherwin Williams” what i need.


Are you planing to spot prime 3M before top coating?
I tried their Spackle & Primer in one product, and still was somewhat flashing under two coats of BM Regal eggshell in White dove color.
Wasn't flashing strong as regular drywall mud or other compounds, but it was not acceptable.
Was very visible when the sun hit the walls.
I had to give that wall quick sanding and spot primed the spots and applied third coat.
B*S* product in my opinion. Maybe others had better experience with it. I was disappointed.


EDIT
Lol, I'm 99% sure that the guy in that video is not a professional painter.
Looking at that table and chairs I was cringing... nothing was covered with plastic for protection.
did you sand the patches in the first place? think about what flashing under paint actually is. without priming the first coat of paint is gonna get sucked in leaving no nap when dry leaving a noticable smooth spot for light to rfeflect off of. of course it's gonna look different if you have a super smooth spot in the middle of a wall it doesn't match it's gonna reflect light differently no matter what you do. you have to blend the patches in with the sanding sponge before you spot prime and then paint to make it blend in there's no magic tricks in painting. even the best walls will blow your mind if you use an inspection light shining flat up the wall to creat shadows. all about perspective which is why level 5 finishes ae needed wherw accent lighting and natural sunlight will be shining straight down a wall or cieling. Recessed can lights are literally designed to get rid of shadows and make your drywall look better. And I am truly amazed at the lengths some people will go to to avoid spot priming which literally takes the tiniest amount of primer and very little time but someone will go spend a ton of money and time on products that they have no idea how to use for no reason.
 

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First off, this thread is a year old and likely not active anymore. 2nd of of all, there are alot of people that will argue that Gardz is in fact a fantastic sealer for bare plaster, especially where a level 5 is expected. Take a minute and maybe introduce yourself here: Thanks.

did you sand the patches in the first place? think about what flashing under paint actually is. without priming the first coat of paint is gonna get sucked in leaving no nap when dry leaving a noticable smooth spot for light to rfeflect off of. of course it's gonna look different if you have a super smooth spot in the middle of a wall it doesn't match it's gonna reflect light differently no matter what you do. you have to blend the patches in with the sanding sponge before you spot prime and then paint to make it blend in there's no magic tricks in painting. even the best walls will blow your mind if you use an inspection light shining flat up the wall to creat shadows. all about perspective which is why level 5 finishes ae needed wherw accent lighting and natural sunlight will be shining straight down a wall or cieling. Recessed can lights are literally designed to get rid of shadows and make your drywall look better. And I am truly amazed at the lengths some people will go to to avoid spot priming which literally takes the tiniest amount of primer and very little time but someone will go spend a ton of money and time on products that they have no idea how to use for no reason.
 

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spot priming takes a couple of minutes and can be painted over after 10 to 15 minutes. you can even spot prime already sealed walls with the paint you are about to use most of the time unless there is accent lighting or something. Half of the problems I'm seeing you guys talk about are probably a result of the guards itself. guards is for sealing down peeling wallpaper and damaged drywall.no need to do it to brand new skimmed walls try not to overthink painting so much. prime the walls with a new drywall primer/sealer, fix the imperfections and nail holes that can be seen, spot prime those patches quick and paint pretty simple.
Seems to be a pretty bold statement to join a group of painting professionals and make your first posts about how we are all probably doing it wrong, especially from someone with a title as a drywaller, (and without even a proper introduction).

I think you'll find there are plenty of ways to get to the finish line, and I'd ask you to keep an open mind in the future and do some reading on these boards and you'll see for yourself why some painters have chosen to use certain products for particular applications. Gardz is much more than for sealing peeling wallpaper or damaged drywall. Welcome to PaintTalk. Looking forward to reading your intro.
 
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