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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, is it advisable to skim coat over wallpaper? Client says do it, but, I'm advising her ,it should be removed along with as much glue as possible?
Thanks in advance!

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Hey all, is it advisable to skim coat over wallpaper? Client says do it, but, I'm advising her ,it should be removed along with as much glue as possible?
Thanks in advance!

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Lots of threads on this subject already.. You can but be sure to prime with gardz first.

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Just finished a wall covering skim coat job today .Home owners couldnt afford the t&m to remove it so I shellac coated it and put on a hawk and trowel finish on it. Not best practice but the crap paper had to go one way or another. I know some like wall coverings but i really hate the stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
We learned just this week to never, EVER let the home owner tell you how to do anything!!! Especially if it's a gal!!!
Lol! She's got the bankroll, but, I just want it done fast and correctly! No call backs!!

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I've been pretty lucky in all my wallpaper jobs that removal was pretty painless. Score it with the little wheel with teeth thing on plaster, or sometimes try to pull the glossy stuff off first when dealing with drywall, then just use a garden sprayer with hot water and a good taping knife. It didn't take over a couple of hours per room, and my amount of gouges on drywall was minimal, and plaster was none, just a few tiny cracks by windows. I might just be lucky, but it wasn't over 2-3 hours per room for removal. I'd think time and materials for a hawk and trowel skim coat and a shellac priming would be a lot more than just removing it, admittedly I'm a slow skim coater/plasterer, though. Then your skim coat would suck more paint and/or would need a primer of a latex primer anyway. Seems like a lot more work. If it's already painted over, likely removing it's gonna be a pain in the ass and a skim coat like you're describing could be the only option, but I just can't see it taking less time to remove it unless it's freak paper with a super glue.

I can't imagine unless the stuff was tenaciously adhered somehow removal would be that difficult, unless it's been painted over. I've also never used Gardz for wallpaper glue, just plain oil primers. However, now due to VOC laws oil is expensive and pointless, so I'm trying to switch to BIN for most oil uses.

I just say this as I have a really bad taste in my mouth from one job where people did paint over wallpaper, with dating from the 1940s. A lot started to peel up, and I had to feather in peeling wallpaper that they thought was peeling paint. One of my first experiences of someone going "**** it, leave it for the next guy." To be fair I must have been 50+ years later, but still.
 

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I've been pretty lucky in all my wallpaper jobs that removal was pretty painless. Score it with the little wheel with teeth thing on plaster, or sometimes try to pull the glossy stuff off first when dealing with drywall, then just use a garden sprayer with hot water and a good taping knife. It didn't take over a couple of hours per room, and my amount of gouges on drywall was minimal, and plaster was none, just a few tiny cracks by windows. I might just be lucky, but it wasn't over 2-3 hours per room for removal. I'd think time and materials for a hawk and trowel skim coat and a shellac priming would be a lot more than just removing it, admittedly I'm a slow skim coater/plasterer, though. Then your skim coat would suck more paint and/or would need a primer of a latex primer anyway. Seems like a lot more work. If it's already painted over, likely removing it's gonna be a pain in the ass and a skim coat like you're describing could be the only option, but I just can't see it taking less time to remove it unless it's freak paper with a super glue.

I can't imagine unless the stuff was tenaciously adhered somehow removal would be that difficult, unless it's been painted over. I've also never used Gardz for wallpaper glue, just plain oil primers. However, now due to VOC laws oil is expensive and pointless, so I'm trying to switch to BIN for most oil uses.

I just say this as I have a really bad taste in my mouth from one job where people did paint over wallpaper, with dating from the 1940s. A lot started to peel up, and I had to feather in peeling wallpaper that they thought was peeling paint. One of my first experiences of someone going "**** it, leave it for the next guy." To be fair I must have been 50+ years later, but still.
Removing wallpaper is best practice yes, however it's always a roll of the dice how easy it will come off. Most likely you will still have to prime and skim anyhow.
So I will have to disagree that taking it off is quicker. All situational of course, but the client is pushing for it. I see no issue with it if it's sound..

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The project I did was wall covering over cheap trailer type paneling that had been skimmed and removing the paper would have required as much or more work to fix. The owners were fine with the result and getting rid of the old paper would have been a nightmare.
 

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Trailer wallpaper is much different thing than your normal wallpaper removal job. If you remove it you will do damage to the substrate which is not very thick and you will have to skim coat it. You were right @kmp it is a freaking nightmare that I will never do again. Cheap sh?? to begin with.
 

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I've been pretty lucky in all my wallpaper jobs that removal was pretty painless. Score it with the little wheel with teeth thing on plaster, or sometimes try to pull the glossy stuff off first when dealing with drywall, then just use a garden sprayer with hot water and a good taping knife. It didn't take over a couple of hours per room, and my amount of gouges on drywall was minimal, and plaster was none, just a few tiny cracks by windows. I might just be lucky, but it wasn't over 2-3 hours per room for removal. I'd think time and materials for a hawk and trowel skim coat and a shellac priming would be a lot more than just removing it, admittedly I'm a slow skim coater/plasterer, though. Then your skim coat would suck more paint and/or would need a primer of a latex primer anyway. Seems like a lot more work. If it's already painted over, likely removing it's gonna be a pain in the ass and a skim coat like you're describing could be the only option, but I just can't see it taking less time to remove it unless it's freak paper with a super glue.

I can't imagine unless the stuff was tenaciously adhered somehow removal would be that difficult, unless it's been painted over. I've also never used Gardz for wallpaper glue, just plain oil primers. However, now due to VOC laws oil is expensive and pointless, so I'm trying to switch to BIN for most oil uses.

I just say this as I have a really bad taste in my mouth from one job where people did paint over wallpaper, with dating from the 1940s. A lot started to peel up, and I had to feather in peeling wallpaper that they thought was peeling paint. One of my first experiences of someone going "**** it, leave it for the next guy." To be fair I must have been 50+ years later, but still.
The key phrase in your quote, I've been pretty lucky, explains it all. Sooner or later the luck will run out and then it will be time to pay the piper!
 

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Gardz will work, but it is waterbased, so it may cause bubbling at first, but once its on and dry, its sealed tight..

To the OP, keep in mind, they make a lot of wallpaper easier to remove nowadays. At least give it a chance to come off. If its a non-woven, and the walls were primed right, it will come off in full sheets.
 

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Gardz will work, but it is waterbased, so it may cause bubbling at first, but once its on and dry, its sealed tight..

To the OP, keep in mind, they make a lot of wallpaper easier to remove nowadays. At least give it a chance to come off. If its a non-woven, and the walls were primed right, it will come off in full sheets.
Wood, you're assuming a lot, how can you assume the walls were primed properly?
 

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Yes, you can skim coat wallpaper but seal it first with an oil based primer.

I'm not sure if Gardz would work?
Ya, oil primer is good too, but will smell your whole house up and burn the eyes out of your head.
Gardz was designed for that. I've done whole houses with it with great success..

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imo it is never advisable to paint over wallpaper.

1. The main reason for saying this, is that if the homeowner EVER wants to remove the wallpaper in the future, painting over it will make it about 10x more difficult to do that.

2. There is no guarantee that painting over wallpaper will not CAUSE some problems.

3. Doesn't look great.



*(removal doesn't not have to be difficult - usually. I would caution against using a scoring wheel, as another poster suggested. It damages the wall, and actually makes it more difficult to remove the paper. Instead, use a pump sprayer and soak paper until it releases easily.)
 

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imo it is never advisable to paint over wallpaper.

1. The main reason for saying this, is that if the homeowner EVER wants to remove the wallpaper in the future, painting over it will make it about 10x more difficult to do that.

2. There is no guarantee that painting over wallpaper will not CAUSE some problems.

3. Doesn't look great.



*(removal doesn't not have to be difficult - usually. I would caution against using a scoring wheel, as another poster suggested. It damages the wall, and actually makes it more difficult to remove the paper. Instead, use a pump sprayer and soak paper until it releases easily.)
I call BS on the scoring wheel damaging the wall. As long as you dont press hard, it leaves no marks on the wall whatsoever. I dont see how you think it would make it more difficult either...
 
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