Professional Painting Contractors Forum banner

21 - 40 of 58 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,684 Posts
I call BS on the scoring wheel damaging the wall. As long as you dont press hard, it leaves no marks on the wall whatsoever. I dont see how you think it would make it more difficult either...
Pulling the paper off in full sheets is the ideal way to remove paper (in my opinion). When it is scored, it tears. Not to mention that scoring is a waste of time (ie., not necessary).

I will concede that the wheel shouldn't damage the wall if the correct amount of pressure is used, but are you seriously telling me you've never had to skim over wheel marks on drywall?
 

·
Super Moderator
Journeyman Painting Contractor
Joined
·
2,922 Posts
Pulling the paper off in full sheets is the ideal way to remove paper (in my opinion). When it is scored, it tears. Not to mention that scoring is a waste of time (ie., not necessary).

I will concede that the wheel shouldn't damage the wall if the correct amount of pressure is used, but are you seriously telling me you've never had to skim over wheel marks on drywall?
Scoring the paper with the tiger wheel is only for when it doesn't come off in full sheets. The idea is to then score and soak so the water gets in behind the outer layer.
Then use a scraper and remove both outer and inner layers at the same time..
I've been removing wallpaper since the 90's and trust me every situation is different..
But at the same time, they all suck.
I don't get too sentimental about whether someone may or may not want it removed in the future. If it's super sound, and going to be a royal pain in the ass to get off. Fine, prime it and paint it.
It may be just as fast to tear the wall out and re drywall if one decides in the future..#.seenitall#



Sent from my SM-T330NU using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,128 Posts
Pulling the paper off in full sheets is the ideal way to remove paper (in my opinion). When it is scored, it tears. Not to mention that scoring is a waste of time (ie., not necessary).

I will concede that the wheel shouldn't damage the wall if the correct amount of pressure is used, but are you seriously telling me you've never had to skim over wheel marks on drywall?
No, I havent. I use ZERO pressure. The wheels are sharp as hell. All you need to do is TOUCH it to the surface. I look really hard at the wall, and dont see anything at all. And if I did... I'd prime it with 123. Its thick enough that it would fill the micro holes anyway.

You only need to do it it the paper is vinyl coated, in which case scoring is not gonna make the paper tear. In my book, The dryer the underside of the paper is, the easier its gonna tear. You cant get the backside of the paper wet without scoring it.

The last few I've done, I pull it down dry, the best I can dry. Wwhatever doesnt, I take the paper tiger, and using NO pressure at all, just run it over the entire surface, spray it down, stick some plastic on the wall to keep it wet, wait, and it comes off like butter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,244 Posts
I call BS on the scoring wheel damaging the wall. As long as you dont press hard, it leaves no marks on the wall whatsoever. I dont see how you think it would make it more difficult either...

Clearly, it depends on how heavy the hand that works the wheel. :wink:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,209 Posts
Holy crap! Now that is pretty cool.

Sent from my SM-T330NU using Tapatalk
I like how it tore through the skim coated and painted canvas lining on the ceiling. Any painters or paper hangers that have been around a while might recall the canvas lining (Sanitas) used for resurfacing old plaster, or the heavier woven fabric faced/vinyl cloth-like backed liners by Wall Over & Wall Cover, pre-dating fiberglass mesh fabric.

Pretty much all painters back then were expected to have basic hanging skills, canvas lining installations over plaster were a common task performed by painters. I’ve done quite a few in my time and removals as well.

Many times when painting old plaster you might encounter what appears to be wallpaper that’s been skim coated and painted over. Chances are it’s not, rather, it’s more likely one of the repair liners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,235 Posts
I like how it tore through the skim coated and painted canvas lining on the ceiling. Any painters or paper hangers that have been around a while might recall the canvas lining (Sanitas) used for resurfacing old plaster, or the heavier woven fabric faced/vinyl cloth-like backed liners by Wall Over & Wall Cover, pre-dating fiberglass mesh fabric.

Pretty much all painters back then were expected to have basic hanging skills, canvas lining installations over plaster were a common task performed by painters. I’ve done quite a few in my time and removals as well.

Many times when painting old plaster you might encounter what appears to be wallpaper that’s been skim coated and painted over. Chances are it’s not, rather, it’s more likely one of the repair liners.
I'm very familiar with old plaster walls lined in canvas, I used to paint this elderly ladies two flat and the first time I painted the ceilings there were hundreds of bubbles hanging down. Anyway, I stopped and went out for lunch and when I got back they all sucked back down. The ceiling was old plaster with a liner and some of the paint must have gotten under it until it went away after drying.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,209 Posts
New technology, still looks extremely messy.

Now for the latest German Tech for taping, sanding, and priming wallboard, All operations are performed by some invisible robot or something. Gotta get me one of these! Das Knauf System Uniflott - YouTube
I’ve used a similar UK system called AntiCrack which is a dry mix setting type compound composed of a fiber/resin reinforced gypsum based material, eliminating the need for joint tape and designed for plaster board applications or complete over wall repairs/base coating. It’s pretty much fail-proof when applied to spec. It’s however not available to the trade, a member’s only/partner applicator type product...and doesn’t meet building codes here in the states due to drywall taping/jointing requirements for level 1 drywall designations..tape must be used for domestic applications sort of killing the entire tapeless concept.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
Try to take 2 free steps forward and wind up taking 5 extra steps back. Putty coat over wallpaper, Whether vinyl, paper or fabric. it will pop even with the best primers. Maybe not the whole substrate, But areas will eventually spiderweb and crack and then lift usually around the edges. Hanging wallpaper back over skim coated wallpaper is a big no no. and people should know better. And paint is a 50/50 crapshoot. If you didn't want to remove the wallpaper your really not gonna want to with primer and a skim coat on it. Skim coating over is a can of worms you don't want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #34 ·
It all pulled off easily except the corner below the light switch and behind the tools.


Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
There is a product from scotch paints called draw tite. It's a good sealer it will suck down any bubbles in the drywall paper and will solidify any paste or adhesives perfect for what you got there. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #36 ·
There is a product from scotch paints called draw tite. It's a good sealer it will suck down any bubbles in the drywall paper and will solidify any paste or adhesives perfect for what you got there. Good luck.[/quote @Vinyl 54X , thanks for the tip. I didnt really want to roll on watery BIN shellac primer. I'll see if its available locally somwwheres?

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,128 Posts
Gardz is a slightly less quality and cheaper version of draw tite, FYI. I dont know the difference between them though....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Never skim coat over wallpaper,
Having said that it will be look good if you do for few years UNTILL the glow start to degrade.

You might find detailed answer in here:
https://elpainters.com.au
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,835 Posts
In my area we have a lot of older Victorian homes . Not uncommon to encounter multiple layers of wallpaper. I swear some of these papers were installed with horse hoof glue, not paste. These houses are well over 100 years old. About the toughest paper removal you'll ever see. Always used a propane steamer on these. It was the only thing that worked, and generally worked quite well.
 
21 - 40 of 58 Posts
Top