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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Going to look at a job on Saturday. Customer told me she wants the texture on the walls gone. I told her that
a) I believe the only way to get a smooth finish is to skim coat b) I have never done something like this c) it will not be cheap d) it will not be perfect.
Has anyone done this kind of thing before..if so, how much work is it. And, if I did skim coat would I have to prime walls that have paint with a gloss shee on them? The picture marked "living room" seems to have at least a satin finish.
 

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Hey Pete. It depends how good you are with the trowel. It's Not really that hard. I would personally prime it first to give some "tooth".
Then take off the high spots. 2 skims with a 12 or 14: trowel should do the trick. All purpose CGC mud. Sand with 180 foam back paper after each coat.. Prime again and look for imperfections.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey Pete. It depends how good you are with the trowel. It's Not really that hard. I would personally prime it first to give some "tooth".
Then take off the high spots. 2 skims with a 12 or 14: trowel should do the trick. All purpose CGC mud. Sand with 180 foam back paper after each coat.. Prime again and look for imperfections.
Thanks!
 

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Your production and outcome will reflect your level of your experience. I've done a few of these with the most challenging being an asbestos laden acoustic (popcorn) ceiling that had been previously painted. I found that skimming in one direction followed with a skim in the opposite direction gave a respectable surface to apply the final skim coat on.
 

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As someone previously mentioned you need to sand the high spots. Fixing the crack is a different issue than skim coating fix that with screws mesh tape or whatever it needs. Than roll mud on the wall with a Roller and pull it down with a wide knife/trowel. Let it dry sand it and roll one more coat of mud and smooth it with knife. Than sand it.
 

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Knock down your high spots with a 5-1. Mix up a bag of durabond(brown bag),mesh tape cracks, skim once or twice more with blue lid prime and paint. No need to pre-prime that’s what the durabond is for. Never sand between coats that just amateurish and leaves unnecessary dust clean up.


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Knock down your high spots with a 5-1. Mix up a bag of durabond(brown bag),mesh tape cracks, skim once or twice more with blue lid prime and paint. No need to pre-prime that’s what the durabond is for. Never sand between coats that just amateurish and leaves unnecessary dust clean up.


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Yes durabond would stick for sure. Although it's harder to sand, and sanding before final skim coat is usually a necessity imo. Also more difficult to skim with durabond and I certainly would not use 2 different products for fear of colour differences in compounds.
But yes, you gotta fix those cracks with tape first.
 

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Are you recommending Gardz under the skim coat or on top?
Durabond would probably stick to the wall without problems, but on an entire wall/ceiling it would make me feel better to put a coat of Gardz on to act as a primer for the fresh plaster.

The more I think of it, I would hire out. I don't like doing work like that, and would likely not be able to give satisfactory results on a large scale.
 

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Durabond would probably stick to the wall without problems, but on an entire wall/ceiling it would make me feel better to put a coat of Gardz on to act as a primer for the fresh plaster.

The more I think of it, I would hire out. I don't like doing work like that, and would likely not be able to give satisfactory results on a large scale.
Im not sure if gardz is really toted as a "bonding" primer..I'd just use something like 123.
 

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I skim walls several times a week.

No, you dont need to prime the wall first. The mud is NOT gonna fall off.

Personally, I use lightweight, cuz its FAR easier to sand. Durabond or mixing types will be a nightmare to sand, and will take a LOT longer.

Mix up the mud in a 5 gallon bucket, put shoe protectors on and construction paper over your drops. Roll it on nice and thick with the thickest nap roller you can buy. I do the top half of the wall first, about 6 feet at a time. Grab your 14" blade, and smooth it down, similar to squeegying a window. Move to the next section, repeat. Get a cheap vacuum attached hand sander from lowes, and a good shop vac with a bag, and you can sand it completely dust free. I use 220. It sands quick and easy. Avoid the pole version of this. It just doesnt work right. You need to sand it a little angled to avoid the sanding screen lines on the wall, and use a light touch. You probably have to do two coats to make it paint grade.

To do one wall, from knocking on the door, to saying goodbye, takes me just a little over an hour, including setup and clean up. And it takes about 15 minutes to vac sand the same wall the next day.

Then gardz, to make it bulletproof.

Like others have said though, anything more than a wall or two or a bathroom, I tell the client to hire a drywall guy. But I generally float all my own walls and bathrooms for wallapper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I skim walls several times a week.

No, you dont need to prime the wall first. The mud is NOT gonna fall off.

Personally, I use lightweight, cuz its FAR easier to sand. Durabond or mixing types will be a nightmare to sand, and will take a LOT longer.

Mix up the mud in a 5 gallon bucket, put shoe protectors on and construction paper over your drops. Roll it on nice and thick with the thickest nap roller you can buy. I do the top half of the wall first, about 6 feet at a time. Grab your 14" blade, and smooth it down, similar to squeegying a window. Move to the next section, repeat. Get a cheap vacuum attached hand sander from lowes, and a good shop vac with a bag, and you can sand it completely dust free. I use 220. It sands quick and easy. Avoid the pole version of this. It just doesnt work right. You need to sand it a little angled to avoid the sanding screen lines on the wall, and use a light touch. You probably have to do two coats to make it paint grade.

To do one wall, from knocking on the door, to saying goodbye, takes me just a little over an hour, including setup and clean up. And it takes about 15 minutes to vac sand the same wall the next day.

Then gardz, to make it bulletproof.

Like others have said though, anything more than a wall or two or a bathroom, I tell the client to hire a drywall guy. But I generally float all my own walls and bathrooms for wallapper.
The home owners have 3 rooms and a hallway that they want done. Thinking that I might suggest a they get a drywall guy.
 

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The home owners have 3 rooms and a hallway that they want done. Thinking that I might suggest a they get a drywall guy.
Why don't you find your own drywall guy and get a quote? A few years ago I painted a friend's bedroom and hallway. He had previously removed all the drywall from the walls. The ceiling was hard popcorn texture. He had a drywall guy skim coat it as well as the living room ceiling. I Gardzed both and painted them. I know it would have taken me a very long time to do what he did as he does this 5 days a week. The drywall was started on a Saturday morning by the contractor and his wife. When I came by at 1pm on Sunday all the drywall was up, taped and mudded - ready for priming!

Why don't you go to Drywalltalk.com (looks like a sister site to this one) and see if you can find someone in your area? If you do find someone that works out, then you will have expanded your business. I did this several years ago here for a 2 story ceiling job I could not do and things worked out very well, thank you Paul!

futtyos
 

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I Gardzed both and painted them.
112590




futtyos gardzyos,
when you get a chance buy a gallon of this product at Benjamin Moore store and try it out in place of Gardz.
Doesn't smell-stink at all like Gardz does, and is an excellent product, and it costs less than Gardz.
When I discovered Corotech I stopped using Gardz.
Smell/stink of Gardz drove me away from it.

Corotech® Clear Acrylic Sealer V027
Waterborne, acrylic priming agent for priming the week substrates as well as protection/impregnation of acrylic paint layers and plasters exposed in interior and exterior environments. Semi-gloss.


TECHNICAL DATA:

corotechyos
 
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