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I am looking at staining over a cedar/natural tone Sikkens Cetol SRD on exterior wood siding and support posts. Would like to go to a darker brown color. I really don't want to paint over this stuff and lose the wood grain and knots.

But the question is whether I can change the color and have it come out right or will it just look awful? It appears to be somewhat translucent, but on the treated lumber (support posts, etc.) I swear this stuff looks like a solid (maybe a different product? or is that just the way the stain interacts with that type of pressure treated wood?

I also have a few raw boards that have been replaced and have not been stained yet. Color matching those will be fun...

My idea is to test with a new color and see how it looks first. If it seems ok, then, for the raw boards I either stain first with the old Sikkens (which I guess is now a PPG product) OR maybe just ask the paint store to try and color match whatever comes through after this new darker stain...

Seems risky. Might decide to just stain it all Sikkens natural again. lol.

Anyone had experience with this?
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Pretty sure Cetol srd is a film forming product. Staining a different colour is not an option unless complete removal of product. Other option is to sand the crap out of it and switch to a solid stain.. Although my knowledge of Cetol is limited..
 

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Pretty sure Cetol srd is a film forming product. Staining a different colour is not an option unless complete removal of product. Other option is to sand the crap out of it and switch to a solid stain.. Although my knowledge of Cetol is limited..
SRD is a non film forming penetrating linseed oil based stain.
You can safely stain over it as long as the wood is sufficiently weathered and will absorb stain again.Like most other linseed oil stains If its still beading water it will need to be stripped.
 

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SRD is a non film forming penetrating linseed oil based stain.
You can safely stain over it as long as the wood is sufficiently weathered and will absorb stain again.Like most other linseed oil stains If its still beading water it will need to be stripped.
My bad. I thought most of those products had a clear or something built in.. Never have actually used it..
 

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My bad. I thought most of those products had a clear or something built in.. Never have actually used it..
SRD is Siding/Rails/Decks. A good product if you can use the 550g/l formula and not the low VOC stuff. Price keeps going up and colors discontinued... Semitransparent is now a waterborne product.
Log and siding is an all-in-one 2-3 coat product, most like a pigmented varnish.
Cetol123 is a penetrating base coat (1) and 2 coats top coat (varnish).
DEK is like a varnish for decks.

None of these products are the same formula they were 10-20 years ago and some colors have been discontinued...
 

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I am looking at staining over a cedar/natural tone Sikkens Cetol SRD on exterior wood siding and support posts. Would like to go to a darker brown color. I really don't want to paint over this stuff and lose the wood grain and knots.

But the question is whether I can change the color and have it come out right or will it just look awful? It appears to be somewhat translucent, but on the treated lumber (support posts, etc.) I swear this stuff looks like a solid (maybe a different product? or is that just the way the stain interacts with that type of pressure treated wood?

I also have a few raw boards that have been replaced and have not been stained yet. Color matching those will be fun...

My idea is to test with a new color and see how it looks first. If it seems ok, then, for the raw boards I either stain first with the old Sikkens (which I guess is now a PPG product) OR maybe just ask the paint store to try and color match whatever comes through after this new darker stain...

Seems risky. Might decide to just stain it all Sikkens natural again. lol.

Anyone had experience with this? View attachment 110831
Quick answer: yes, you can re-stain with Sikkens Cetol in a different color.

SIkkens cetol is a penetrating stain, but it forms a slick surface that often does not play nice with others.
As long as you stick with the same product you can change the color and it should be fine be fine. It is a transparent stain, so underlying colors will influence your new color. It is best not to over-apply for the reason mentioned (it builds up a sheen when over-applied- this slick surface.can be problematic if you ever want to change to a different brand of stain).

If you ever change products be forewarned that adhesion between new and existing stain will need to be carefully considered.
 

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* Sikkens oil based products need to be careful with (regarding the adhesion between different brands/products). Their Water-borne stains do not have the same issue.
 

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Quick answer: yes, you can re-stain with Sikkens Cetol in a different color.

SIkkens cetol is a penetrating stain, but it forms a slick surface that often does not play nice with others.
As long as you stick with the same product you can change the color and it should be fine be fine. It is a transparent stain, so underlying colors will influence your new color. It is best not to over-apply for the reason mentioned (it builds up a sheen when over-applied- this slick surface.can be problematic if you ever want to change to a different brand of stain).

If you ever change products be forewarned that adhesion between new and existing stain will need to be carefully considered.
Like most other linseed oil stains SRD adhesion isn't an issue even moving to a different product as long as the stain has sufficiently weathered. If the stains is still beading water then more prep is required.
 

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Like most other linseed oil stains SRD adhesion isn't an issue even moving to a different product as long as the stain has sufficiently weathered. If the stains is still beading water then more prep is required.
I'm wary of Sikkens.

I have seen multiple failures when painted over and the surface was "not sufficiently weathered".
There must be a high resin content (or something) that causes the slick surface.

Here is a house we re-stained this year (using latex Solid Stain).

The last painter used the same latex Solid Stain over Cetol 123. The whole house was peeling from lack of adhesion. and we had to scrape it back to a stable surface. 60-80% of the previous solid stain came off with very little effort. I think the house was ~8 years old when re-stained the first time with Cetol semi-trans.

*Also note - the upper porch ceiling - is stained (x1 coat) with the Cetol maintenance coat. The customer wanted to retain some of the original parts when they switched to Solid Stain. See how shiny it is!

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Sikkens names are are like BMW models ...it's like they are intentionally trying to confuse the customer, even more so now that PPG has started re-naming them.

However, it should be remembered that Sikkens oil-based stains need to be treated with caution when stained or painted over. Due diligence should be exercised when going over them with anything different.
 

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I'm wary of Sikkens.

I have seen multiple failures when painted over and the surface was "not sufficiently weathered".
There must be a high resin content (or something) that causes the slick surface.

Here is a house we re-stained this year (using latex Solid Stain).

The last painter used the same latex Solid Stain over Cetol 123. The whole house was peeling from lack of adhesion. and we had to scrape it back to a stable surface. 60-80% of the previous solid stain came off with very little effort. I think the house was ~8 years old when re-stained the first time with Cetol semi-trans.

*Also note - the upper porch ceiling - is stained (x1 coat) with the Cetol maintenance coat. The customer wanted to retain some of the original parts when they switched to Solid Stain. See how shiny it is!
Yes 123 is essentially a pigmented varnish. I usually recommend completely blasting using glass bead or walnut shell. SRD is a completely different product, a traditional penetrating stain.
 

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Yes 123 is essentially a pigmented varnish. I usually recommend completely blasting using glass bead or walnut shell. SRD is a completely different product, a traditional penetrating stain.
The owner considered blasting the siding to remedy the problem. In fact, he went so far as to have one wall blasted and re-painted, which was expensive.
It should be noted, especially with soft woods like Cedar, that blasting (in this case Walnut shells) significantly altered the sidings appearance by pronouncing the grain texture with deep valleys and peaks.
 

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The owner considered blasting the siding to remedy the problem. In fact, he went so far as to have one wall blasted and re-painted, which was expensive.
It should be noted, especially with soft woods like Cedar, that blasting (in this case Walnut shells) significantly altered the sidings appearance by pronouncing the grain texture with deep valleys and peaks.

I’ve media blasted both cedar & redwood siding and had to follow up and remove the denser latewood with an aggressive DA sander.

We’ve also had clients pay some pretty big bucks to brush remove the softer early-wood being that brushed-textured wood has become the rave over the past ten years, both inside and on exteriors. We’ve also had clients request media blasted wood interior paneling, the texture often being the desired look.

BTW, nice looking house...great colors and textures.
 

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I’ve media blasted both cedar & redwood siding and had to follow up and remove the denser latewood with an aggressive DA sander.

We’ve also had clients pay some pretty big bucks to brush remove the softer early-wood being that brushed-textured wood has become the rave over the past ten years, both inside and on exteriors. We’ve also had clients request media blasted wood interior paneling, the texture often being the desired look.

BTW, nice looking house...great colors and textures.
We don't work on many stone houses, so it was certainly unique for us (had to be careful not to get anything on the beautiful stonework!).

There were some high spots that were difficult to reach, and did not particularity enjoy working on it. Ladders only, not accessible with a boom lift. (All of the soffits and porch ceilings were Sikkens maintenance coat, the Siding and Fascia were done in latex solid stain)

I can see how some would like the look of the grain texture showing. In this case, I think one of the features that is so visually pleasing is the contrast between the smooth-cut Cedar planks and the rough-cut stone.

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