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Senior Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I need advice

Allright guys! I need some Input. A beautiful custom new construction home we're workin on has a supervisor who is imposible to please. I have a contract with the owner, the super is like a cousin or something who they brought in to do the carpentry work and supervise the subs. Aparently he can do everyones job better than they can. We have finished ceilings, Primed and first coated all walls. The trim package came in we primed it sanded and first coated for installation. He says it's to ruff to install. I sent my 2 best painters to sand for 2 days it's still not good enough. He's expecting a finished product before install. Every sub has had problems. There are no specs. We are doing PDCA quality work. HELP!!!!
 

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speed comes with quality
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190 Posts
your best bet would be to just keep telling him your getting it as slick as possible.notice I say telling him.other then that good luck with this one.
 

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FT painter/FT dad
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slash his tires















or not
 

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Rock On
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I have a contract with the owner, the super is like a cousin or something who they brought in....
Tell him to sod off
Only deal the the signer of the contract
Not the "cousin contractor"

Next, print out a few copies of the PDCA standards
Next, you'll need to get paid for work completed so far
Only speak to the signer of the contract
You can tell him you are having a problem with the "super"
Remind him that your contract is with him, not any "super"
Show him the standards
Give him a copy or two
Get that check for work done so far by any means necessary
Stop work if you must.... until the check clears...or at least is in your hands

Once you get paid for what you have done, then you can decide whether or not to continue
But you need to get covered for what you've done so far

If you are caught up money-wise
Cool
Still tell the cousin to pound sand, and the H/O you'll only deal with the contract signer...etc...etc...if they want you to continue

It might seem hardcore, but you are being hosed and probably don't need this 'contractor cousin' proving to his kin that he can beat the painters down like junk yard dogs or Flip This House contractors because they stole his Pink Power Rangers doll back in 1989 and flushed it down the toidy...
 

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Senior Member
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've got the Standards ready P-14 but they don't really apply to new work I'm goin down to inspect the trim in the morning. If I feel it's quality work I'm goin to sit down with the h o. I received 1/3 to start. we're about half and are ready for another 1/3 at this point as per contract. I talked with our suncoast chapter president and he wants to come down as a 3rd party rep.
 

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Epoxy Dude
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566 Posts
First, I agree with slick...

However, as an alternative:

Why not ask the 'super' to prep one piece to show you what it is he is looking for?
 

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Registered
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I'd be careful about asking the guy for a sample at this point. He'll do an autobody quality sample and then expect the same.

I'd take the homeowner route first. Show him what you are doing and hope he's reasonable. If not then you have to put the gloves on. Since he has already paid 1/3 he doesn't want to go through the hassle either.

Best wishes

Mndrk
 

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8 Posts
I.ve ran into similar citiuations a few times now and in each instance I approached the ( homeowner ) whom the contract was signed by. I explained the citiuation, they expected the work, and took care of the third party problems. Sometimes its just best to talk.
 

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Ohio Painting Contractor
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275 Posts
He says it's to ruff to install. I sent my 2 best painters to sand for 2 days it's still not good enough. He's expecting a finished product before install. Every sub has had problems. There are no specs. We are doing PDCA quality work. HELP!!!!
From my experience dont rely on your two best painters word, or previous work ethics untill inspected by yourself. We have had clients complain and we immediatly think no way our best painters where there.... sure enough we go look at the job and 9 times out of 10 the client is right. Wait 10 out of 10 the client is always right. Although that contractor is not your client make sure you inspect the work dont assume your best painters automatically did a great job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I inspected the work last friday. It felt smooth. After install we putty,sand and caulk then brush the finish coat. This guy wants it glass smooth before install. He said sanding sponges aren't good enough besides you sanded again after the first finish coat so you need to prime again! I sat down with H O explaining the process and pointing out that it states this in the contract. I offered to bring in our PDCA Suncoast chapter president as a third party, they weren't interested. I suggested they should hire someone T and M or let me do my job and answer to them only. As it stands today I'm waiting to here back from him if he wants to break the contract. I told him I would walk away for half of what I'm owed up to this point. I hope this doesn't get ugly!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Rock On
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This guy wants it glass smooth before install. He said sanding sponges aren't good enough besides you sanded again after the first finish coat so you need to prime again!
Dumbass

I dunno, I think you handled that pretty good
Better than I could've I'm sure
I like the offer to bring in the others, good idea

We'll see what happens I guess...
 

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Systems Fanatic
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1,390 Posts
This may not help now, but we specify that we will prepare surfaces to meet the paint manufacturer's specifications. Combined with the PDCA standards, this covers us 99.99% of the time from the unreasonable customer.

Priming after the first coat is not a part of the paint manufacturer's specs of any product I know or use.

This also may not help now, but it is always good to know the customer's expectations ahead of time. If those expectations are unreasonable, we can re-educate the customer or walk from the job. But if we discover those expectations in the middle of the job, we are in a very difficult position.

I tell customers that we can meet any reasonable expectation. The issue is whether they want to spend the money to meet it. Often they have champagne tastes and a beer budget. It's good to know that up front.

As far as smooth as glass before it's installed-- what does he want after it's installed? Does he expect no nail holes, no hammer divots, no scratches, etc.?

I'd be interested in seeing the actual contract. It sounds to me like the GC/HO are treating you like a "typical" paint contractor. They think they have you by the nads and you will bend over and take whatever they want to dish out.

Frankly, I'm tired of people taking advantage of others. A business transaction is supposed to be mutually beneficial. I suspect you didn't cover yourself well enough, but that is no excuse for others to set unreasonable standards and use you. It may be time to take some dramatic action, and get their full attention. But what is appropriate will depend on the contract.

For what it's worth, I have a long time customer who had an addition done. She wanted me to do the painting. I insisted that the contract be with her, not the GC. The GC is trying to treat me like a "typical" paint contractor-- he wants us to first coat everything, pull off, and when we return repair all of the damage. I told my customer that I'd do this, if he wanted to pay for it. There shouldn't be any damage. If there is, why should I fix it for free? It wasn't included in my price. He wants me to be his clean up guy for free and this homey ain't playing that game.

I'd be happy to help in any way I can.

Brian Phillips
 

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Ohio Painting Contractor
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275 Posts
Don’t settle for less! According to the code and ethics isn’t it with in 5 feet of normal lighting conditions? Screw that do the work and sue them if you have to. If you know the job is done right than im sure its done right. He is most likely salty because his part timer (maintenance painter) didn’t get the contract. If you can complete the project according to specs and conditions in a professional manner many painting contractors settle for less, at least make a profit don’t let this jack*** bully you around. If you feel comfortable abandon ship than do so otherwise perform and collect what’s due that’s the name of the game.
 

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Systems Fanatic
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1,390 Posts
Don’t settle for less! According to the code and ethics isn’t it with in 5 feet of normal lighting conditions? Screw that do the work and sue them if you have to.

I don't agree with this for 2 reasons.

1. I make exceptions to the 5 foot rule-- is that really practical on kitchen cabinets? I don't think so. I'm not out to wave a contract, or PDCA standards in the face of my customer. I want to identify what they want, and then deliver it. (That brings up other issues, but that's for another time.)

2. We don't know what the contract states. How can we take sides if we don't know what was agreed to? I have suspicions about the contract, but I don't know for sure. I have suspicions that the GC/HO is trying to screw the painter, but I don't know for sure.

Brian Phillips
 

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Premium Member
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This sounds to me like the wannabe GC is using the excuse of a poor paint job as a stall tactic. Besides, there's always going to be work on trim after it's hung.
 

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Senior Member
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The contract is a simple ACT contractor forms.
Inserted was basically Prime and finish ceilings before trim installation.
Prime and First Coat all walls before trim installation.
Prime,sand, and first coat all trim before insallation
After trim installed Putty, caulk,sand and finish paint all walls and trim
 
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