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Hi, guys I'm Jon and I just got my C33 license in CA I have over 20 years of experience in commercial and residential painting and I would appreciate some help on a question I have. I am just starting and I been getting small jobs that I usually can handle on my own while working for a company full time but just in the past week I got a referral for a bigger job and gave them an estimate. My question is "Is their a way I can hire people as the jobs come or do I need to have them as full time employees?"

Any help would be appreciated also any business tips would be great.
Thanks
 

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You can use day laborer's from an agency. Some may actually have painters they will lease out though I wouldn't hold my breath for a superstar.
 

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JonDoe said:
Hi, guys I'm Jon and I just got my C33 license in CA I have over 20 years of experience in commercial and residential painting and I would appreciate some help on a question I have. I am just starting and I been getting small jobs that I usually can handle on my own while working for a company full time but just in the past week I got a referral for a bigger job and gave them an estimate. My question is "Is their a way I can hire people as the jobs come or do I need to have them as full time employees?"

Any help would be appreciated also any business tips would be great.
Thanks
Hit me up bro I can help you on both ends,but for now go to the labor place ,the only problem with that is you should do background check just be careful that what saying can't just pick up a guy says that paint anybody can paint its all in the prep you know that ,

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You can network with other independents in the same situation as you. When I was first starting out on my own, i'd get a guy I worked with at another company who had gone out on his own as well to help with larger projects. I'd help him with his as well. The employees come later on when you have a more stable schedule.
 

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Rcon said:
You can network with other independents in the same situation as you. When I was first starting out on my own, i'd get a guy I worked with at another company who had gone out on his own as well to help with larger projects. I'd help him with his as well. The employees come later on when you have a more stable schedule.
I've done this too with good results. It's all about finding people you jive with.
I think a lot about the idea of employee owned companies, specifically in the trades, having been a solo guy at times.. I've often thought ,"I need another me". The thought of taking on an employee that may or may not have a clue seems like it would be more trouble than its worth.
One of the best and most successful contractors I ever worked with was BB&C, three ace carpenters that got together and started contracting. I worked for one of the B's, (the other B&C had a good painter already). They would have a couple houses going at the same time. One of there policies was to have a licensed contractor on site at all times during work hrs. And all three guys worked, they had a few employees, but they would sorta tag-team the jobs and get together to do the important stuff on each job.
What would happen if instead of having employees you had partners. Other "journeymen" that you collaborated with to work on multiple projects to the benefit of all? You could even hire management to work for you, as the labor instead of the other way around.
This would require a lot of compromise along with cooperation, trust, and a good deal of luck to find the right people. You would argue about things (like whether or not to cut ceilings) ;) but maybe good craftsmanship is universal, to an extent anyway. And these differences could be overcome.
I've only scratched the surface of this idea in practice, but I like it. A lot....
It's complicated, and a hassle, so is running a crew of employees. My wife's photography business runs on a similar premise.
It's an idea, not for everyone of course. Just saying the classic way of doing business doesn't have to be the only way........still flushing out the idea.
 

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Josh

I've thought about that as well. The drawback of course is that you're not making money off the partners as you would off of employees. The plus side is working with skilled people who have a vested interest in getting the job done well and profitably, and hopefully people you get along well with. I've heard many bad stories of partnerships failing so I've never really pursued it. I have been thinking along those lines lately of bringing on someone who could learn the ropes and possibly grow into that position.
 
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