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I did an estimate today for an old home that was a real mess. The paint is falling off of this thing, almost as if someone painted latex over oil at some point (layers are flaking off, while leaving paint behind it). Plus the paint itself is almost as thick as a sheet of cardboard, so who knows how many times this thing has been painted.

I've only done a couple of jobs that involve stripping all of the paint, but it was nasty stuff. In addition to that, there has to be just excessive amounts of lead paint in there. Still, my opinion is that all of the paint needs to come off in order to ensure a long lasting finish.

So what would y'all do? Would you suggest to the customer to completely strip the paint? Or would it be best to remove the boards and replace with hardy plank? What is economically most sensible? How much more would completely replacing siding be compared to stripping it? My main concern is I don't know how to price a job that involves redoing siding.

For a reference, it's an old 50's bungalow style house (one story of siding on the front and back, and one and a half stories on each side)

Thanks in advance

-Dylan
 

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So what would y'all do?
-Dylan
I would honestly discuss all the options with the customer, even going so far as to call siding contractors and get estimates to go along with mine.

Check this tool out, it may help you bid as it gives production rates.
 

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Rock On
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...there has to be just excessive amounts of lead paint in there. Still, my opinion is that all of the paint needs to come off in order to ensure a long lasting finish.

So what would y'all do? Would you suggest to the customer to completely strip the paint?
In all the states I'm aware of you can't charge for removing lead paint unless you are certified

My main concern is I don't know how to price a job that involves redoing siding.
I'm not sure how many painters do
 

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Epoxy Dude
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Check this tool out, it may help you bid as it gives production rates.
That's awesome... lol Nice little tool...

Another option would be the new water-based bio friendly (biodegradeable) paint strippers. Some of them can be spray applied on vertical surfaces. It is possible that you could spread tarps on the ground... spray on the stripper (~40 mils thick) with an airless... come back the next day to find the paint laying on the tarp... You would then need to pressure wash.

Of course... they're not cheap...
 

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There is also another option. You could pressure wash all the loose stuff, scrape any questionable paint ( use tarps to collect scrapings) and then use a high build penetrating acrylic latex primer to spot prime low areas followed by an overall coat of a high build primer. There are a couple of thick primers (10 mil DFT per coat) that could help do the job. A lead paint remediation job requires certified lead encapsulant paint among other things. Unfortunately coatings that meet those specs don't breathe which could lead to other problems down the road. Be aware that some communities have restrictions and regulations regarding removal of exterior lead paint and prohibitions on power sanding and blasting.
 

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FT painter/FT dad
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There is also another option. You could pressure wash all the loose stuff, scrape any questionable paint ( use tarps to collect scrapings) and then use a high build penetrating acrylic latex primer to spot prime low areas followed by an overall coat of a high build primer. There are a couple of thick primers (10 mil DFT per coat) that could help do the job
the above sounds a bit too much like a bandaid for me, lack of feathered edges will get you every time

Wonder what came of this job...rangie you around?
 

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Ohio Painting Contractor
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That's awesome... lol Nice little tool...

Another option would be the new water-based bio friendly (biodegradeable) paint strippers. Some of them can be spray applied on vertical surfaces. It is possible that you could spread tarps on the ground... spray on the stripper (~40 mils thick) with an airless... come back the next day to find the paint laying on the tarp... You would then need to pressure wash.

Of course... they're not cheap...

I would have to agree. We have done a few jobs like this. We use peelaway 1. It is designed for the removal of lead base paints, which you can take a 4 hour class and be certified in no time at all. The good thing about the certification from what I understand is that only 1 member of your orginization needs to be certified to perform the task ( not the entire crew).

First off what we normally do is plastic net the house and wet sand it to remove the bulk, reason being most people don't want lead paint chips all over the place. After wet sanding and removing the bulk protect all items not to be preserved and you can either spray, brush, or roll the material on. It comes with a paper that you wrap on the surface after coating it with the stripper. You then wait 48 hours pull the paper of and wa la off comes the lead paint stuck to the paper. You will have to check with your local EPA to despose the waste. After that step you powerwash and remove whatever other small areas that need attention. We use an oil base primer thinned out 30% and latex satin topcoat, or a soild latex stain, or a semi transparent latex stain.
Heres a link to the manufactures website http://www.dumondchemicals.com/html/peelaway.htm
 
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