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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i knew i was pushing it with incoming weather, so i tried to take every precaution possible. here’s an overview

-primed with peel stop triple thick
  • noticed tannin bleed (paint had flaked badly, lots of raw spots)
  • primed over the peel stop with dunn edwards block it
  • applied 2 full coats kelly moore acryshield low sheen (rated to 35).
  • used digital laser thermometer and ensured temps were 55 or above of both paint and surface.
  • dried and looked great
2 days later had rain and snow mix, temps dipping into high 20s. humidity 100 percent.

the picture with the drops laid out is what it looked like a day after. the rest are current. is this surfactant leaching? could this have been prevented? what’s the best course of action for fixing? hopefully the pics go through
 

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I hate to say it but while the temps for outside work may have been ok, the rain/snow 2 days later and humidity at 100% was detrimental to your work. Yes, the temperatures would have been ok but the amount of time needed for the paint to "cure" was not enough. This is the reason why I no longer do outside work. If you re-do this paint in the spring (when there's no rain), you'll get a much better job. I don't think it's surfactant that's leaching.
 

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should i apply an oil based primer to seal whatever that is before i go to fix it next spring
If you notice bleeding, an oil based primer should be used. If not, go right over it. I don't think your top coat had time to cure before the moisture came into the picture and ruined it. By the way, what is "Peel Stop" and what kind of product is it, oil, shellac, or latex?
 
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  • used digital laser thermometer and ensured temps were 55 or above of both paint and surface.
  • dried and looked great
2 days later had rain and snow mix, temps dipping into high 20s. humidity 100 percent.
So if you had rain and snow two days later, I'm quite sure that at night and in the mornings you had lots of moisture in the air.
Snow just doesn't start falling without weather getting "ready" for such conditions. There is a build up to the point that snow arrives.
Even if it was nice and dry during the day time when you were painting, evenings and mornings messed things up for you.
Paint dried on the surface but not under the surface, paint was in a thermal shock so to say.
 

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So if you had rain and snow two days later, I'm quite sure that at night and in the mornings you had lots of moisture in the air.
Snow just doesn't start falling without weather getting "ready" for such conditions. There is a build up to the point that snow arrives.
Even if it was nice and dry during the day time when you were painting, evenings and mornings messed things up for you.
Paint dried on the surface but not under the surface, paint was in a thermal shock so to say.
Clearly you don't live in the mountains lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
i’ve been watching the forecast. it was nice with lows in the high 30s low 40s. rain was forecast with low of 35 for one day then it was supposed to warm up again into 50s and 60s. the morning it was supposed to rain, forecast changed to snow and lows dropped and next week forecast for rain/snow. i knew i was taking a risk but the winters have been pretty mild the last few years and i figured if i had a little leaching i’d just rinse it off or reshoot. i didn’t expect things to go this bad, but i knew it was possible. in the eastern sierras if you don’t like the forecast, just wait 15 minutes and it will change. i accept full responsibility for the problem. i warned the owner. i took every precaution i could besides telling him to wait until spring. and i’m going to fix it. i just don’t want to assume it’s surfactant and find out it’s something else that bleeds through a fresh coat.
 

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looks exactly like surfactant leaching. Used to have customers call all the time this time of year. wipe it all, worst case scenario repaint come spring.

One guy was painting in snow storm and suprised the dark gray leached just like yours.

Another fella oil primed at 10k feet and tried to use mooreguard over it a week later when it warmed up. Well the primer hadn't dried and major solvent entrapment was causing the finish to crawl away from its self. My BM rep had a video that was crazy. HO was adamant it was bad product until we made a sample board inside and had no issue at all.
 

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Why so many replies claiming the paint job is ruined or compromised? We don't know that yet. Surfactant leaching doesn't necessarily compromise a coating. He hasn't even tried to remove any of the surfactant.

OP, take the suggestion by @cocomonkeynuts to try and wipe down a few boards with a damp microfiber cloth. I'd actually hose it all down first, then rag the spots still visible. Manually wiping the entire exterior would be tedious, especially since you'll need to change & clean rags often.

There's still a chance all of it can be removed, but I'd get on it ASAP. Keep us posted.
 

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Doesn’t look like anything was back-brushed. Just saying.
If you zoom in on the first pic, in between the slats of the siding you'll see paint accumulation from being pushed off the big faces and into the little grooves. IMHO, that buildup in the little slats is indicative of either back-rolling or back-brushing. It certainly isn't a natural occurrence when spraying.
 

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If you zoom in on the first pic, in between the slats of the siding you'll see paint accumulation from being pushed off the big faces and into the little grooves. IMHO, that buildup in the little slats is indicative of either back-rolling or back-brushing. It certainly isn't a natural occurrence when spraying.
not seeing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Why so many replies claiming the paint job is ruined or compromised? We don't know that yet. Surfactant leaching doesn't necessarily compromise a coating. He hasn't even tried to remove any of the surfactant.

OP, take the suggestion by @cocomonkeynuts to try and wipe down a few boards with a damp microfiber cloth. I'd actually hose it all down first, then rag the spots still visible. Manually wiping the entire exterior would be tedious, especially since you'll need to change & clean rags often.

There's still a chance all of it can be removed, but I'd get on it ASAP. Keep us posted.
If you zoom in on the first pic, in between the slats of the siding you'll see paint accumulation from being pushed off the big faces and into the little grooves. IMHO, that buildup in the little slats is indicative of either back-rolling or back-brushing. It certainly isn't a natural occurrence when spraying.
yes i back roll everything
 
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