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Discussion Starter #1
I didn't know this happened but what do I know anyway. I oil primed and water-based top coated this pergola about three years ago. Everything looked great but now 3 years later as you can see there appears to be tannins weeping out of the little slots in the treated wood. Anybody else have this? I'm guessing we probably didn't get the oil based primer pushed up inside those slots enough. My plan is to top coat with an oil base instead of water-based this time, my question is should I reprime this with oil first, or go straight to oil top coat over this previous water based top coat? Thanks in advance.
 

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What's with the slots? I have never seen that...

Anyway, yeah. It looks like you didn't get down into them with the primer or paint. Honestly, I'm completely uncertain about what I would do...but when something comes to be, I'll tell ya.
 

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Agree with @Joe67, it's weeping out of the slots.
Coverstain and a 4" roller (1/2" nap) would work. Then proceed as before. It's unfortunate looks like you used paint. but I would switch to a water-based solid stain instead of paint going forward (breathes better and easier to maintain IMO).
 

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What's with the slots? I have never seen that...

Anyway, yeah. It looks like you didn't get down into them with the primer or paint. Honestly, I'm completely uncertain about what I would do...but when something comes to be, I'll tell ya.
They’re incision marks found on incised treated lumber. It’s more of a west coast thing when treating certain species which don’t accept chemical treatments all too well, such as DF, unlike the ACQ treated SYP that most are familiar with on the east coast.
 

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They’re incision marks found on incised treated lumber. It’s more of a west coast thing when treating certain species which don’t accept chemical treatments all too well, such as DF, unlike the ACQ treated SYP that most are familiar with on the east coast.
Thanks. Thought it might be regional (lifetime east coaster here). They look like hell! (Even if not bleeding).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What's with the slots? I have never seen that...

Anyway, yeah. It looks like you didn't get down into them with the primer or paint. Honestly, I'm completely uncertain about what I would do...but when something comes to be, I'll tell ya.
Agree with @Joe67, it's weeping out of the slots.
Coverstain and a 4" roller (1/2" nap) would work. Then proceed as before. It's unfortunate looks like you used paint. but I would switch to a water-based solid stain instead of paint going forward (breathes better and easier to maintain IMO).
Yeah the only reason I painted this one is because the lady wanted high gloss to match the high gloss trim on her house, and I couldn't seem to find a high-gloss solid stain. I agree with you do I like the solid stains better.
What's with the slots? I have never seen that...

Anyway, yeah. It looks like you didn't get down into them with the primer or paint. Honestly, I'm completely uncertain about what I would do...but when something comes to be, I'll tell ya.
Thats funny, being a lifetime west coaster I figured all treated wood had the little incisions! in them
 

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Ya, I think your suppose to let that treated lumber dry out for sometime if painting. Definitely another oil primer, but would stick with Acrylic top coat personally..
 

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It really can be a gamble. I've seen pressure treated wood that was so fresh it weighed a ton get primed with bull 123 and top coated with latex that ended up looking great for many years. I've also seen what we see above happen. At the end of the day, if you gamble and lose that's what you get.

Several years ago while doing an interior, the HO had his son build and paint a pergola made out of CEDAR. The bloodiest of woods. Primed with latex and painted cc40. That ended up looking absolutely bloody horrible.
 

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Ya, I think your suppose to let that treated lumber dry out for sometime if painting. Definitely another oil primer, but would stick with Acrylic top coat personally..
Acrylic topcoat will always peel in this scenario - light the fuse.
I always try to switch fences, arbors, pergolas, to solid stain whenever possible.
 

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Acrylic topcoat will always peel in this scenario - light the fuse.
I always try to switch fences, arbors, pergolas, to solid stain whenever possible.
Are you talking oil stain or acrylic? I love solid stain also, but it's only acting as a paint on top of old coatings. I don't see it performing any different or better than a good quality acrylic paint.
 

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Are you talking oil stain or acrylic? I love solid stain also, but it's only acting as a paint on top of old coatings. I don't see it performing any different or better than a good quality acrylic paint.
If someone has primed/painted a fence, arbor, pergola, etc... with latex paint, I will generally try to transition that into Solid Latex Stain next time it needs painting. They are compatible, so no issue that way.

When (not if) the paint peels, stain is easier to touch up, doesn’t require primer, does require scraping, and has little “build”, so it looks better (does not have the chipped paint texture). I acknowledge that the painted parts will continue to peel down the road, but the penetrating nature of solid stain is better at getting into nooks and crannies.

My feeling is that Stain holds up better than latex in situations where there is: exposure to end grain, cracks cannot be sealed that allows moisture to penetrate, horizontal boards that hold water and snow, screws allow moisture intrusion, etc...

*Oil based solid stain used to be my first choice for raw wood in these situations, but they have officially discontinued it, and is unavailable at both stores in my area.
 

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Yup, I get your theory and I have also done that route. However, I believe once something is painted with a film forming product, continuing with a quality 100% acrylic paint is going to out perform a latex stain. All the same, like I said, the stain at this point is just acting like a thin latex paint so it will do just fine.
On the other hand, I re-sided my house with spruce clapboard a few years ago. We painted it with straight-up arborcoat latex stain. Man it still looks fantastic!
 

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Yup, I get your theory and I have also done that route. However, I believe once something is painted with a film forming product, continuing with a quality 100% acrylic paint is going to out perform a latex stain. All the same, like I said, the stain at this point is just acting like a thin latex paint so it will do just fine.
On the other hand, I re-sided my house with spruce clapboard a few years ago. We painted it with straight-up arborcoat latex stain. Man it still looks fantastic!
not to belabor the point, but allow me to belabor the point to death...

In my observation these types of outdoor wood structures tend to peel more as they develop a thicker mil of Exterior paint on them, and the peeling is more pronounced.

Moisture will always find a way into the wood. Especially on fences, pergolas, arbors, etc... there's no way to completely seal them.

I think Solid Stain "breathes" better. Yes, it is essentially a "thin Latex", but it doesn't form the same kind of thick film as exterior paint.
 

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That is pressure treated wood. Unfortunately its not made for that application, decorative corbels!! That wood is commonly used on the undersides of decks and for posts that are close or buried beneath the soil line. They are not supposed to be painted. You can, but it is not recommended to do so.
 

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Would shellac not be the way to go instead of oil primer? I'm not quite sure what is bleeding through but obviously knots will always bleed through oil primer over time but not so much shellac.

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Discussion Starter #18
Ya, I think your suppose to let that treated lumber dry out for sometime if painting. Definitely another oil primer, but would stick with Acrylic top coat personally..
Yup i let it sit over the winter before finishing
thats called pressure treated

its supposed to age before painting I believe

Google can be your friend
yeah they say up to six months, I let it sit over winter so it should've had plenty of time to dry out
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Would shellac not be the way to go instead of oil primer? I'm not quite sure what is bleeding through but obviously knots will always bleed through oil primer over time but not so much shellac.

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My understanding with shellac is that it should only be used as a spot primer for exterior due to its brittle nature. I don't have personal experience with this but just what I've read
 

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That is pressure treated wood. Unfortunately its not made for that application, decorative corbels!! That wood is commonly used on the undersides of decks and for posts that are close or buried beneath the soil line. They are not supposed to be painted. You can, but it is not recommended to do so.
I've solid stained a few of these with good results, and it can look great finished up to match the house color. Interestingly, I've not had tannin bleed through on solid latex stain. I'm not sure what they put in the latex solid stain that blocks tannins but it is definitely more effective then what we have here, which is actually an oil based undercoat with a water-based top coat. On this particular occasion the homeowner wanted high gloss paint, one of those customers who has their mind set on something for whatever reason, so I figured I can get away with the water-based top coat with oil based undercoat. Obviously it didn't work
 
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