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Girl Boss
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is mainly a Q for @alchemyRedux but also anyone who is familiar with target coatings CR cross-linker...

Do u prefer to mix the night before or day of?

If done the night before, is there a sweet spot for use, say I don’t end up needing it until late into the evening the next day.. or even the next morning...

Is there a period were it becomes less effective or worry about separation of the linker from the resin solids?
 

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Just being nosey.


From Target CL100 Crosslinker info page for EMTECH WB topcoats.


"Unlike acid catalysts, which have a very short pot-life, waterborne cross-linkers are reactive to oxygen only when the coating it is added to is allowed to form a film and air-dry. Therefore, the pot life of finishes fortified with CL100 water soluble CrossLinker will remain functional for upwards of 100+ hours when stored in a sealed container, eliminating the expensive loss and waste of unused material."
 

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Hey PPD,

Link for mixing the CL100 crosslinker:

https://vimeo.com/274681855

I mix it the evening before, allowing 12 hrs before use. Jeff makes mention in the video of a gritty/chippy finish if not done properly, which is pretty much the case. I also filter it the following day, or during each pour just to be on the safe side. There really isn’t a sweet spot per say, at least not that I noticed. I try not to let it go beyond 100 hrs. I’m guessing this is for your white oak project? If so, best of luck!
 

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Girl Boss
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just being nosey.


From Target CL100 Crosslinker info page for EMTECH WB topcoats.


"Unlike acid catalysts, which have a very short pot-life, waterborne cross-linkers are reactive to oxygen only when the coating it is added to is allowed to form a film and air-dry. Therefore, the pot life of finishes fortified with CL100 water soluble CrossLinker will remain functional for upwards of 100+ hours when stored in a sealed container, eliminating the expensive loss and waste of unused material."


Spose I shoulda taken the time to look first hahaha- thank u for doin it for me! ;)
 

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Girl Boss
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hey PPD,



Link for mixing the CL100 crosslinker:



https://vimeo.com/274681855



I mix it the evening before, allowing 12 hrs before use. Jeff makes mention in the video of a gritty/chippy finish if not done properly, which is pretty much the case. I also filter it the following day, or during each pour just to be on the safe side. There really isn’t a sweet spot per say, at least not that I noticed. I try not to let it go beyond 100 hrs. I’m guessing this is for your white oak project? If so, best of luck!


I think u posted that once before haha- thanks!

Yep, am starting test finishes & figured its a good day to get an order in during the sale.

Seriously, I can’t tell u how perfect ur timing was with that project post....it was EVERYTHING I was tryin to explain but couldn’t get across to find the right products. EVERYONE I talked too was tellin me it wasn’t practical for our lifestyle or recommended a slightly more mid tone look.

The contractor who’s helping us remove the load bearing wall said I’d regret doing a natural pale finish on the hard surfaces. I tried explaining that natural patina is appealing to us & if done well I feel its timeless (hence marble counters, un-lacquered brass fixtures, etc) ...but he kept insisting it wouldn’t look worn- once it was really lived in there would be things needing major repairs or even replacement in just a few years.

He knows his stuff & I respect his opinion so it had me doubting myself & ready to change the whole plan...

Then a few days later you posted those job images n product info & I seriously yelled “OMG THATS IT! THATS MY VISION! IT CAN BE DONE!” :) ...sent him pictures & kindly told him to bugger off n let me do my thing, thank u very much ;)

You seriously saved my sanity & probably a lot of money...I know I wouldn’t have been happy going another direction. Its so beautiful & timeless...I CANNOT WAIT!

Am gunna be bleaching the new entry dutch door & work off that for the window sash & wood floor decisions, hopefully avoiding a lot of extra work tryin to get the surfaces to play nice together.

I still wish u lived closer. If ya decide to take a vacation to san diego sometime in the next 1-2 years I’ve got an amazing vacation rental property (w/ salt water pool) to bribe u with!...Its conveniently right next door- u know, in case u wanna come work some magic (cuz thats the best way to spend time off isn’t it?)
 

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Thanks PPD...flattery will get you everything..California sounds great...I’m there!

Just another tip when bleaching/neutralizing...take it the extra step and wash the acetate salts off with distilled water. Micro fiber and warm/hot water pulls them out of the wood, the salts act as a desiccant causing the finishes to dry too quickly, and also interfere with the chemical and water resistance of coatings, even when applying a barrier coating such as dewaxed shellac. Rinse, ring, and refresh your rinse water. Let the wood dry down thoroughly before sealing too. It’ll save you some trouble down the road, and will prevent re-activation if exposed to moisture, sometimes resulting in white stains beneath the clear coats. You can rinse before or after de-nibbing.

Also as silly as this might sound, try not to have your trimmers use zinc electroplated fasteners/nails if you haven’t gotten that far...use stainless 304 on trim installations when bleaching. The EP wire fasteners are sometimes affected by corrosives such as vinegar, resulting in black halos around the fastener holes, especially with pin nails in conjunction with white oak.

I would also advise not using the EM9000 which I’ve recommended in the past. Although there’s inventory floating around, it’s been discontinued. I’m wrapping up some loose ends on a 6 month project having used the 9000 and luckily have a few leftover gallons for future maintenance if needed. The EM7000 is the replacement product, having never used it but did see testing..seems to perform well...I’m in the testing stages “again”, searching for that perfect clear finish..wanting to limit my choices to -zero- HAP finishes. Can’t really spray any regulated or hazardous materials outside of an enclosed spray booth here, otherwise 2K finishes would be my first choice.

“Timeless” pretty much nails the look, my clients often use the same word to describe the mood and vibe created by the minimalist look, yet complex/procedure heavy finish designs.

The home that inspired was an entrant in the Palladio Awards, and is being considered for publication in HC&G Magazine.

The link to the designers website is as follows, having done all the finishing on most of the wood-heavy homes @ the link, others having served as a finish design consultant. There’s a story and photography at the link about the home that inspired located in the journal section, “Resurrecting An Old Design Strategy for a New Century”.

https://jamesmerrellarchitects.com

Ciao for now..J
 

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Hey PPD,

Link for mixing the CL100 crosslinker:



I mix it the evening before, allowing 12 hrs before use. Jeff makes mention in the video of a gritty/chippy finish if not done properly, which is pretty much the case. I also filter it the following day, or during each pour just to be on the safe side. There really isn’t a sweet spot per say, at least not that I noticed. I try not to let it go beyond 100 hrs. I’m guessing this is for your white oak project? If so, best of luck!
I'd like your opinion on these tests of the EM 6000,7000,8000 lines with and without the cross-linker. I'm not sure how scientific his process was. Have you done any similar testing? I don't know what the manufacturers use for a scratch test but this guy used a coin. For adhesion testing he used packing tape.

Are you using EM6000 for kitchen cabinets?

Here is another tester for stain resistance. Again, I'm not sure how scientific his process was. The Target Coatings had virtually no stain resistance.

 

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I'd like your opinion on these tests of the EM 6000,7000,8000 lines with and without the cross-linker. I'm not sure how scientific his process was. Have you done any similar testing? I don't know what the manufacturers use for a scratch test but this guy used a coin. For adhesion testing he used packing tape.

Are you using EM6000 for kitchen cabinets?
Target Coatings Em6000 Em7000 Em8000 Review - YouTube

Here is another tester for stain resistance. Again, I'm not sure how scientific his process was. The Target Coatings had virtually no stain resistance.

Comparison of Target Coatings Waterborne Finishes - YouTube
I’ve also seen both videos, questioning the validity of the tests..I don’t have photo documentation of the 8000 tests aside from the last couple of pics which I just took minutes ago after reading your post. I just performed an alcohol test on a table base scheduled for delivery later today, having placed a puddle of denatured alcohol on it, allowing it to flash off which took 10+/- minutes, having aggressively rubbed it with a paper towel just before it totally flashed off, leaving only the faintest visible blemish as a result of the aggressive rubbing, and I’m having difficulty seeing the blemish. Just for kicks I just did the same thing to my 2K finished oak flooring for my own edification, the denatured alcohol having nearly identical results with the 2K WB PU’s. The 8000 has performed incredibly well on two kitchen table applications performed 5 months ago...no stains, scuffs, or abrasions. The table base was finished with 4 coats of the EM8000 flat with 5% CL100. It had 4 weeks of curing time and was self sealed with the 8000. My test results were clearly different than what was illustrated in the two videos. Always best to test yourself, rather than rely on tests performed by others.
 

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I'd like your opinion on these tests of the EM 6000,7000,8000 lines with and without the cross-linker. I'm not sure how scientific his process was. Have you done any similar testing? I don't know what the manufacturers use for a scratch test but this guy used a coin. For adhesion testing he used packing tape.

Are you using EM6000 for kitchen cabinets?
Target Coatings Em6000 Em7000 Em8000 Review - YouTube

Here is another tester for stain resistance. Again, I'm not sure how scientific his process was. The Target Coatings had virtually no stain resistance.

Comparison of Target Coatings Waterborne Finishes - YouTube
I’ve also performed the actual ASTM 3359 – 97 Standard Test Methods for Measuring Adhesion by Tape Test on the 9000 (discontinued), 9300, and 8000, all self sealed, and all passing with -zero-lifting of finish unlike the 8000 over vinyl sealer in the video. I’m thinking the vinyl sealer in the video may provide a weak link.

I also conducted KCMA chemical resistance tests on the 8000, 9300, and 9000, all with similar results as indicated on EMTECH’s data sheets. I performed the tests over bleached wood, the residual salts somewhat altering the performance of the finishes, thus making note to PPD to rinse and extract residual surface salts after neutralizing, the residual acetate salts being both water and alcohol soluble resulting in a high pH when going back into solution.

With the testing I wasn’t getting immediate favorable results, having to allow the finishes to cure upwards 4 weeks. I conducted standing water tests after 1 week, the photos illustrated that the finishes had little tolerance for standing water, water permeating the finish in under 2 hrs, the finish and underlying wood recovering. After waiting 4 weeks the finish did tighten up, providing good chemical and water resistance. The 9300’s inability to provide hold out against water after 1 week, being an exterior rated product, was a bit concerning. I would question the finishes ability to be placed into immediate service for an exterior application.

The first pic illustrates a standing water test of the EM9000 with 5% CL100 after allowing the finish to cure 4 weeks, water only slightly permeating the finish at the 21 hr mark, both the wood and finish recovering...I can’t believe I actually stayed up 21 hrs, rewetting the sponges and making observations every 1/2 hr!

The 2nd pic illustrates the same finish with the CL100 only having cured 1 week. Water permeated the finish in less than 2 hrs.

The 3rd pic illustrates the 9300 polycarbonate after 2 weeks, water permeating the finish in less than 1 hr. I applied the water with my fingertips spelling the word WET..you can see where the underlying wood got wet. I did not use the crosslinker for the 9300 test.

The 4th pic illustrates the 9000 with the CL100 with a 4 week cure after 4 hrs of standing water..

My choice for clear finishes is always based on subjected use, with 2K’s or oils for flooring, 2K’s on kitchen millwork and bath vanities, crosslinked single component WB PU’s providing water/ammonia/409/mild acidic-alkaline resistance for running trim/window & door packs...not too concerned with lacquer thinner, 90 proof denatured alcohol, or acetone as illustrated in the video. I’ve only had one built-in get wrecked by a client knocking over a bottle of nail polish remover..
 

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Girl Boss
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'd like your opinion on these tests of the EM 6000,7000,8000 lines with and without the cross-linker. I'm not sure how scientific his process was. Have you done any similar testing? I don't know what the manufacturers use for a scratch test but this guy used a coin. For adhesion testing he used packing tape.

Are you using EM6000 for kitchen cabinets?
Target Coatings Em6000 Em7000 Em8000 Review - YouTube

Here is another tester for stain resistance. Again, I'm not sure how scientific his process was. The Target Coatings had virtually no stain resistance.

Comparison of Target Coatings Waterborne Finishes - YouTube


I was actually gunna ask the exact same thing having watched the videos the other day (that guy w/ the coin drove me insane w/ his incessant “um” & I did feel like his methods were iffy at best but it had me curious)...so thanx for askin!
 

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Hey PPD,

Link for mixing the CL100 crosslinker:

https://vimeo.com/274681855

I mix it the evening before, allowing 12 hrs before use. Jeff makes mention in the video of a gritty/chippy finish if not done properly, which is pretty much the case. I also filter it the following day, or during each pour just to be on the safe side. There really isn’t a sweet spot per say, at least not that I noticed. I try not to let it go beyond 100 hrs. I’m guessing this is for your white oak project? If so, best of luck!

Looks similar to application with aziridine cross linker. If you just dump it in too fast it shocks the system and starts forming crystals with the resin. Has to be added slowly while stirring.


Have you experimented with aziridine? You can add them to basically any acrylic and polyurethanes including self crosslinking PU's like lenmar 1wb.500
 

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Looks similar to application with aziridine cross linker. If you just dump it in too fast it shocks the system and starts forming crystals with the resin. Has to be added slowly while stirring.


Have you experimented with aziridine? You can add them to basically any acrylic and polyurethanes including self crosslinking PU's like lenmar 1wb.500
Coco, I talked to our technical rep from Ben Moore about this when you brought it up previously, and at first he was acting like their would be no benefit, but when I explained it to him a little more he got all defensive about how no manufacturer would stand behind something like that. I told him that wasnt what I was asking, just if it was a viable idea, but I think it got into some "proprietary" ingredients for a paint they make, and he didnt want to risk spilling the beans. so he just said no.

gotta love manufacturer reps
 

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Coco, I talked to our technical rep from Ben Moore about this when you brought it up previously, and at first he was acting like their would be no benefit, but when I explained it to him a little more he got all defensive about how no manufacturer would stand behind something like that. I told him that wasnt what I was asking, just if it was a viable idea, but I think it got into some "proprietary" ingredients for a paint they make, and he didnt want to risk spilling the beans. so he just said no.

gotta love manufacturer reps

Its a general purpose cross linker, the feedback I got is that it works quite nicely with products like the acrylic DTM and polyurethanes. I only was looking into it in the first place since that is what many manufacturers use a crosslinker in their urethanes. I also learned it can cause an allergic reaction in some people so if you feel itchy while spraying a product with aziridine you know why. Of course the manufacturer doesn't necessarily recommend that, they couldnt test
 

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Looks similar to application with aziridine cross linker. If you just dump it in too fast it shocks the system and starts forming crystals with the resin. Has to be added slowly while stirring.


Have you experimented with aziridine? You can add them to basically any acrylic and polyurethanes including self crosslinking PU's like lenmar 1wb.500
I’ve used aziridine crosslinkers in the form of 2-methylaziridine-1-propionate for Basic Coatings Streetshoe, and Polyfunctional Aziridine for Bona Mega. I’m certain I’ve used them with some of the other European clear floor finishes. Both the Streetshoe and Mega are “nearly” bombproof, and I’d have to attribute that to the aziridines.

I would have to say that aziridine crosslinked clear finishes I’ve worked with outperform “all” waterborne clear finishes in terms of chemical resistance, mar resistance, scratch resistance, and adhesion, aside from 2K isocyanate catalyzed clears. It’s a wonder they’re primarily used for floor coatings and not so much for vertical surface coatings, Sayerlack Hydroplus being one of only a couple I know of, which would account for its performance. I haven’t even thought of or even considered the possibilities of using them for anything other than floor finishes until reading your post. I do have a bunch lying around and I think I’m going to have to try them out in the EMTECH products and others.

Thanks for the tip!

Oh, EMTECH’s CL100 is an organosilane crosslinker.
 

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I’ve used aziridine crosslinkers in the form of 2-methylaziridine-1-propionate for Basic Coatings Streetshoe, and Polyfunctional Aziridine for Bona Mega. I’m certain I’ve used them with some of the other European clear floor finishes. Both the Streetshoe and Mega are “nearly” bombproof, and I’d have to attribute that to the aziridines.

I would have to say that aziridine crosslinked clear finishes I’ve worked with outperform “all” waterborne clear finishes in terms of chemical resistance, mar resistance, scratch resistance, and adhesion, aside from 2K isocyanate catalyzed clears. It’s a wonder they’re primarily used for floor coatings and not so much for vertical surface coatings, Sayerlack Hydroplus being one of only a couple I know of, which would account for its performance. I haven’t even thought of or even considered the possibilities of using them for anything other than floor finishes until reading your post. I do have a bunch lying around and I think I’m going to have to try them out in the EMTECH products and others.

Thanks for the tip!

Oh, EMTECH’s CL100 is an organosilane crosslinker.

I couldn't find too much on the chemistry of the CL100 cross linker but one of the advantages of aziridine I see is that its nearly universal across waterborne products, easy to find, long pot life and very inexpensive. Ie it could be added to a gallon of staysclear or HP25 DTM for example.
 

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I couldn't find too much on the chemistry of the CL100 cross linker but one of the advantages of aziridine I see is that its nearly universal across waterborne products, easy to find, long pot life and very inexpensive. Ie it could be added to a gallon of staysclear or HP25 DTM for example.
There actually is a sweet spot with aziridine..best to use within 24 hrs after cross linking...can be crosslinked a second time, although it is advisable to discard unused material after the second use. I think the Hydroplus calls for 2% by volume.

I have some unused bottles of the polyfunctional aziridine for the Mega. De-ionized water gets added to the crosslinker and then dumped into the gallon, capped, and shaken. It doesn’t shock the system like the CL100..no gritty or chippy texture. I’m going to try it with StaysClear just to see if I can’t produce a finish comparable to the Hydroplus. That would be a game changer.

Mr Smith and the OP might want to take a look at Eric’s YouTube test video of the Hydroplus with the crosslinker. He compares the chemical resistance and durability only second to CIC which is a 2K isocyanate catalyzed finish...I haven’t tried the Centurion products, and probably won’t. He also does a comparison of Kem Aqua & Hydroplus, the Hydroplus not being crosslinked with the aziridine. The stand alone test of the Hydroplus illustrates how significant of a difference the aziridine makes.
 

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There actually is a sweet spot with aziridine..best to use within 24 hrs after cross linking...can be crosslinked a second time, although it is advisable to discard unused material after the second use. I think the Hydroplus calls for 2% by volume.

I have some unused bottles of the polyfunctional aziridine for the Mega. De-ionized water gets added to the crosslinker and then dumped into the gallon, capped, and shaken. It doesn’t shock the system like the CL100..no gritty or chippy texture. I’m going to try it with StaysClear just to see if I can’t produce a finish comparable to the Hydroplus. That would be a game changer.

Mr Smith and the OP might want to take a look at Eric’s YouTube test video of the Hydroplus with the crosslinker. He compares the chemical resistance and durability only second to CIC which is a 2K isocyanate catalyzed finish...I haven’t tried the Centurion products, and probably won’t. He also does a comparison of Kem Aqua & Hydroplus, the Hydroplus not being crosslinked with the aziridine. The stand alone test of the Hydroplus illustrates how significant of a difference the aziridine makes.
ya I saw that after going down this rabbit hole...lol

The Sayerlac looks like a great product that is widely available unlike most of the mail-order WB coatings. He says it has great vertical hang (doesn't run) compared to the Kem Aqua. With the cross-link added it's very tough and relatively cheap compared to the Centurion 275. He says he doesn't add the cross-link most of the time to the Sayerlac...It's probably not needed for most residential kitchens.

The shipping costs for the Centurion basically doubles the price of the coating to Canada.
 

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Girl Boss
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks PPD...flattery will get you everything..California sounds great...I’m there!

Just another tip when bleaching/neutralizing...take it the extra step and wash the acetate salts off with distilled water. Micro fiber and warm/hot water pulls them out of the wood, the salts act as a desiccant causing the finishes to dry too quickly, and also interfere with the chemical and water resistance of coatings, even when applying a barrier coating such as dewaxed shellac. Rinse, ring, and refresh your rinse water. Let the wood dry down thoroughly before sealing too. It’ll save you some trouble down the road, and will prevent re-activation if exposed to moisture, sometimes resulting in white stains beneath the clear coats. You can rinse before or after de-nibbing.

Also as silly as this might sound, try not to have your trimmers use zinc electroplated fasteners/nails if you haven’t gotten that far...use stainless 304 on trim installations when bleaching. The EP wire fasteners are sometimes affected by corrosives such as vinegar, resulting in black halos around the fastener holes, especially with pin nails in conjunction with white oak.

I would also advise not using the EM9000 which I’ve recommended in the past. Although there’s inventory floating around, it’s been discontinued. I’m wrapping up some loose ends on a 6 month project having used the 9000 and luckily have a few leftover gallons for future maintenance if needed. The EM7000 is the replacement product, having never used it but did see testing..seems to perform well...I’m in the testing stages “again”, searching for that perfect clear finish..wanting to limit my choices to -zero- HAP finishes. Can’t really spray any regulated or hazardous materials outside of an enclosed spray booth here, otherwise 2K finishes would be my first choice.

“Timeless” pretty much nails the look, my clients often use the same word to describe the mood and vibe created by the minimalist look, yet complex/procedure heavy finish designs.

The home that inspired was an entrant in the Palladio Awards, and is being considered for publication in HC&G Magazine.

The link to the designers website is as follows, having done all the finishing on most of the wood-heavy homes @ the link, others having served as a finish design consultant. There’s a story and photography at the link about the home that inspired located in the journal section, “Resurrecting An Old Design Strategy for a New Century”.

https://jamesmerrellarchitects.com

Ciao for now..J


Have I told u lately how awesome u are?! ;)

Totally agree- it IS timeless! The thing I think a lot of ppl don’t understand about ‘minimalism style’ is that its expensive to do right & u gotta have a designer that knows their sh*t. There’s no room for error. If u just try n pull it off by pairing down the amount of stuff u put into a space then sounds reverberate, surfaces feel blank & bland, and it feels like people are still in the process of moving in. Not to say owning less is a bad thing but I do think there’s a point that takes it too far....& the finishes MUST be on point.

My ideal house is Steve & Brooke Giannini’s “Patina Farm”. I visited them recently & it’s like a dream...I couldn’t believe how much it feels JUST like the books when your there in person. We’re not quite that lucky....I’m workin off a 1970’s california ranch - but trying to incorporate as much of the textures & tones as possible w/ out going overboard. Unfortunately the mid-century modern style that would come so easily to our architecture & area doesn’t appeal to me so I’m making it difficult (of course haha).

I always rinse after bleaching & give it plenty of dry time but have had blushing/clouding issues in the past & could NOT figure out wth was goin on. I assumed it was batch issue or application temp...never considered it might be my rinse method. And ur totally right- dewaxed shellac helped but I could still see the finish was compromised & not nearly as clear as it should be. Time to change up my rinse method!

Good call on SS fasteners- wouldn’t have thought about that!

Ummm what?! Any word on why they’re discontinuing the 9000? Guess I’ll be tryin out some Aziridine CL!

Ugh- testing sucks! The worst part for me is the fear of recreating the same results. Even tho we abuse those test boards to cover all our bases- I worry it won’t perform the same when the substrate is different, weather changes, or any other of the 1,000,000 variables change....

I’m a creature of habit when it comes to durability products. Once I know something works well I despise being forced to change!! The VOC laws threw me in a tail spin a few yr’s back- about 40% of my ride or die products weren’t gunna be available anymore.... I about threw a full blown temper tantrum right there in the supply store (no joke).

Lemme know how it goes ur testing goes w/ the StayClear- I freakin LOVE that stuff!
 

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Girl Boss
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Its a general purpose cross linker, the feedback I got is that it works quite nicely with products like the acrylic DTM and polyurethanes. I only was looking into it in the first place since that is what many manufacturers use a crosslinker in their urethanes. I also learned it can cause an allergic reaction in some people so if you feel itchy while spraying a product with aziridine you know why. Of course the manufacturer doesn't necessarily recommend that, they couldnt test

Thanx for the info- I’m gunna play around w/ this & see what I can come up with!
 

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Girl Boss
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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
There actually is a sweet spot with aziridine..best to use within 24 hrs after cross linking...can be crosslinked a second time, although it is advisable to discard unused material after the second use. I think the Hydroplus calls for 2% by volume.

I have some unused bottles of the polyfunctional aziridine for the Mega. De-ionized water gets added to the crosslinker and then dumped into the gallon, capped, and shaken. It doesn’t shock the system like the CL100..no gritty or chippy texture. I’m going to try it with StaysClear just to see if I can’t produce a finish comparable to the Hydroplus. That would be a game changer.

Mr Smith and the OP might want to take a look at Eric’s YouTube test video of the Hydroplus with the crosslinker. He compares the chemical resistance and durability only second to CIC which is a 2K isocyanate catalyzed finish...I haven’t tried the Centurion products, and probably won’t. He also does a comparison of Kem Aqua & Hydroplus, the Hydroplus not being crosslinked with the aziridine. The stand alone test of the Hydroplus illustrates how significant of a difference the aziridine makes.


Is eric on PT? Found the video u mentioned & would love to chat with him! Crazy how much of a difference the CL made in mar resistence
 
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