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Kem aqua will work on repaints, but SW won't warranty it.

BIN gets brittle, over time. I know a lot of guys swear on it, because they don't get bleed through and short-term it looks good. If I was doing my own personal kitchen, I'd go with oil primer.
I agree oil is the way to go if possible, love the sanding ability as well, smoother finish
 

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If I had to use shellac as a tie coat on a refinish, I’d probably opt for SealCoat, or better yet, mix a up a batch of shellac using dewaxed flake applied “thinly”. I suspect the fillers in pigmented shellac might account for BIN’s brittleness.

Not having elongation at break values for either BIN or SealCoat films, which could probably be obtained from Rust-Oleum, I couldn’t validate that BIN is more brittle than SealCoat. The Eb values are sometimes included on tech sheets. I think a pure shellac film has an Eb value of 4% which would suggest that it’s tolerant to interior wood substrate dimensional changes in most instances, dimensional changes in wood typically being the root cause for films such as BIN cracking and failing.

I started using dewaxed shellac as a tie coat in limited instances under 2K finishes almost 8 years ago, probably covering just under 15K sq ft of wood surfaces, many of which are in wet locations such as bathrooms and kitchens, and nothing’s exhibited the slightest bit of failure, and I do check in on the homes frequently where it’s been used.
 

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If finisher Eric Reason were a member here, he’d probably be raining on the BIN party too!

Below is a link to a “BIN Gone Bad” YouTube video illustrating a shellac primer failure in a kitchen he finished.

I won't challange that, but I still think He just likes the sound of his own voice.
 

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If I had to use shellac as a tie coat on a refinish, I’d probably opt for SealCoat, or better yet, mix a up a batch of shellac using dewaxed flake applied “thinly”. I suspect the fillers in pigmented shellac might account for BIN’s brittleness.

Not having elongation at break values for either BIN or SealCoat films, which could probably be obtained from Rust-Oleum, I couldn’t validate that BIN is more brittle than SealCoat. The Eb values are sometimes included on tech sheets. I think a pure shellac film has an Eb value of 4% which would suggest that it’s tolerant to interior wood substrate dimensional changes in most instances, dimensional changes in wood typically being the root cause for films such as BIN cracking and failing.

I started using dewaxed shellac as a tie coat in limited instances under 2K finishes almost 8 years ago, probably covering just under 15K sq ft of wood surfaces, many of which are in wet locations such as bathrooms and kitchens, and nothing’s exhibited the slightest bit of failure, and I do check in on the homes frequently where it’s been used.
That's a great idea. I guess the only drawback would be that it drys clear, not giving any covering power or the ability to locate defects in your wood.
 

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If we're going to talk about long-term failure (ie., BIN), Lacquer should also be mentioned. Unless they have drastically improved the formula, Lacquers have a fairly short life-span before cracking and chipping.

I love they way Lacquers look at first (like glass), but they are difficult to touch-up when they fail, and (correct me if I'm wrong) do especially poorly in areas of high moisture (like Kitchen/Bathroom Cabinets) and in areas that receive a lot of direct sunlight. I am also under the impression that Laquers become brittle as they age.
 

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If we're going to talk about long-term failure (ie., BIN), Lacquer should also be mentioned. Unless they have drastically improved the formula, Lacquers have a fairly short life-span before cracking and chipping.

I love they way Lacquers look at first (like glass), but they are difficult to touch-up when they fail, and (correct me if I'm wrong) do especially poorly in areas of high moisture (like Kitchen/Bathroom Cabinets) and in areas that receive a lot of direct sunlight. I am also under the impression that Laquers become brittle as they age.

Yeah..my first two years in business I had a high output cabinet finishing shop and we were pumping out some pretty serious volumes of NC, CAB, and Post-Cat lacquers. Within two years, the lacquer on nearly every set of cabinets started crazing & cracking like mad on the maple veneered sheet goods.

Although not held accountable due not spec’ing the finishes, combined with veneer stresses/underlying lather checking being a major contributing factor, the lacquer’s mechanical properties, especially the film’s elongation at break values, just weren’t tolerant to the stresses and movement in the veneers. In simpler terms they were just too hard and brittle.

We switched to automotive 2K urethanes in lieu of lacquer, being 2K finishes hadn’t yet been available in the architectural coatings industry.
 
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