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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon everyone!
In about 2-3 weeks i am going to have about 11-12 doors to paint. Have already pretty much decieded that i'm going to spray them, my problem now is that i don't have a shop i can take them too. I have a double garage available to me, it will probably have some furniture stored in it though? I was planning on rigging up some sort of temp spray booth style set-up in the garage, nothing fancy just some weighted drop/plastic sheets for walls and drop sheets on the ground, obviousley i'll secure edges as much as poss.
Was just wondering if anyone else has been in this situation? and how you conquered it? Any advice?
 

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Mask off the floor completely with Rosin paper and cover anything completely that you do not want overspray on. It will find a way to get there. Next, get a old furnace blower that you can have blow either out the overhead door (open the door just enough so the fan has clearance and block the sides under the OH door). Have a window or service door opposite the fan that you can open so that air is moved through the garage (opening should be opposite the fan so you have proper air flow). Good airflow is key for moving the overspray out. You will need to heat the garage as well. If you are spraying lacquer or anything solvent, be careful that you do not create an explosion hazard. I would get everything very warm, shut off the heater, spray, let overspray clear, shut off the blower, lower the door, and then fire up the heater again to dry the finish.
 

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I'd never consider spraying 12 doors in a "someone I know has a garage type deal" that might be available
...well that's not exactly true...I should add "unless it's truly clear"
Read: completely empty, and we've been butt-buddies since '74, and I know where the bodies are hidden/buried
But for the most part, the liability isn't worth the risk

I do (now, and have for the last few years had) have a "Cover-It" shelter (size-wise, a pretty decent sized garage) for such apps
(as I haven't had an actual shop big enough for this type of project)

I have propane heaters enough to heat it though

Admittedly, it was (originally) used for an auto-resto project a few years ago, but using it for this type of project the Cover-It more than paid for itself (spray-wise, aside from the resto) pretty quick

Lately, I've been leasing/renting it (the Cover-It) to other Painting Contractors for exactly your type of situation
Whether it's a "bring to me" or I'll "bring it to you" type deal (it is reasonably portable)...it hasn't sucked
 

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Personally I've sprayed in many garages for the exact same type of job, a dozen doors, or maybe baseboards, whatever. I've never had a problem, but I always over cover everything just to be safe.

Key is to seal off everything, and have clean airflow, movement with dust in the air is a recipe for disaster and many garages are dirty.

I picked up a few poles that you can quickly set up a wall with long enough plastic by extanding the pole and either wedging it in place, or fine tune it with a few quick twists.

If there is a lot of stuff in the garage you severely limit your working space and need to be EXTREMELY careful with the partition wall. Most of the time I have a mostly empty garage to work with, maybe a few hanging tools and a workbench.

Cover everything, floors walls, and get the airflow, and as it has been said be careful if you're using anything like lacquer, don't want to blow up a house :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks guys, good advice! we'll see how it goes but think if i do do it in the garage i'll move everything out. The airflow thing might be a prob as the only other door in the garage leads to inside the house?? Have seen 'garage in a box' which is prob the same thing as the 'Cover-it', basically a very sturdy metal frame and tough (don't know exact material) weatherproof cover, great idea except i don't have anywhere i could stick it up to use it, grrrrr!
anyways, thanks again guys, i'll let you know how it goes.
 

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A couple of quick tips is to be sure to take something to put on the ground (plywood strips) because it will get hella sticky. Also if you can get some big pieces of cardboard for the tops of the doors to help with controlling over spray. If you do this put a couple of stir sticks between the door and cardboard so it does not touch or you might get drips.

One other thing is I have had problems with static electricity and plastic. It won't blow up but just be aware and make sure and use a grounded outlet.
 
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