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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a better, more advanced, way to test if the siding I have been tasked to stain will absorb the stain? I have heard about flicking water and if the water absorbs in and doesn't bead it "should' be ok to stain but is there a better more scientific way? A meter of sorts I could use?

Reason I am asking, the customer wanted his southern facing side of his house restained. I washed it and waited a good week of dry weather to test the color. The stain is PPG ProLuxe SRD TeakOil. That is what he used previously. It's been over 4 years. Stained a board with new stain, out of the box, and it didn't soak in. Finish was glossy and not matte. I talked with my supplier and they said it was because the wood is not ready to be restained. It is still holding on and preserved. I flicked water on it. the water sucked in, but maybe not enough?
I tried a board that was somewhat hidden but not by no means in the shade.
Wood Plant Rectangle Brick Road surface


This is the side of the house in April this year. The board length I stained was lower left.
Automotive parking light Cloud Sky Plant Vehicle
 

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Water beading is a proven test which is fairly accurate. Anything else would be highly subjective and situational. I would also do a test for moisture content, but that's just so I know the wood itself is ready, not necessarily related to whether or not the current stain has weathered sufficiently. That wood looks pretty dry from the picture I looked at. My guess is the shiny-ness you're seeing is due to the (semi) film-forming properties of ProLuxe. I don't think it'd look any less shiny if you waited another year honestly, unless you strip it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Only my second time using this, PPG Proluxe. First time was with new wood that had weathered a year. It soaked in OK, but could not do a wet-on-wet application. I would hate, and so would the customer, to have it shiny like this. And he is not going to pay for me to strip it. Hate to switch to a different product. Thanks for the reply.
 

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It looks dry. The test swatch looks like it soaked "into" the wood, and the previous stain looks faded and has not formed a film. I wouldn't hesitate to apply a maintenance coat.

Sikkens (ProLuxe) bonds extremely well to itelf, so even if you apply (over-apply) it before it is completely worn from the surface no problem. However, I would be cautious switching to another product (having encountered some bad failures from others having done so). Because of the high resin content (the shininess that you are referring to), it is basically like a varnish, an other products don't always adhere to it well. It will be shiny, and become more so with routine maintenance.

I guess if you were going to switch, now would be the time, but any shiny spots from previous should be sanded.
 

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that wood does look quite dry, the water test is what I tell people to do. All exterior stains(transparent) will form a film(and peel) when coated too thick or too soon. Vertical surfaces always last longer than horizontals. If you give it a coat(not a bad idea) wipe any excess off to prevent any build up and peeling. hope that helps.
 

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Having mentioned it was done on a southern elevation, it may have not soaked in and dried shiny due to being applied in direct sunlight….the surface temp might have been too hot due to the dark color causing the solvents to flash off too quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
that wood does look quite dry, the water test is what I tell people to do. All exterior stains(transparent) will form a film(and peel) when coated too thick or too soon. Vertical surfaces always last longer than horizontals. If you give it a coat(not a bad idea) wipe any excess off to prevent any build up and peeling. hope that helps.
Give it a wipe. Interesting suggestion. I'm thinking of microfiber cloths or any other suggestion that won't snag and leave lint. Maybe Rags in a Box or Shop Rags.

Is this what you mean? A little more work but could serve the purpose.
 
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