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Hi all,

So I will be diving head first into a formal apprenticeship soon.

I have been chipping away at a degree for some time. I have quite a few credits. School has never really been my thing, but in the interest of capitalizing on what I've already invested, I'd like to walk away with something.

I'm thinking construction management.

If I do invest my time into that, what could I do in the painting world with such a degree (other than going out on my own, of course)? Are there upper level management roles I could take on?

Perhaps I'm getting way ahead of myself :vs_laugh::vs_laugh: gotta get out in the field first. Just considering my options given the credits I've already taken.
 

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Hi all,

So I will be diving head first into a formal apprenticeship soon.

I have been chipping away at a degree for some time. I have quite a few credits. School has never really been my thing, but in the interest of capitalizing on what I've already invested, I'd like to walk away with something.

I'm thinking construction management.

If I do invest my time into that, what could I do in the painting world with such a degree (other than going out on my own, of course)? Are there upper level management roles I could take on?

Perhaps I'm getting way ahead of myself :vs_laugh::vs_laugh: gotta get out in the field first. Just considering my options given the credits I've already taken.
Maybe not so much in the painting world but a construction management degree is what gets you in the door with GC's that do mega-projects.
At first , your wet behind the ears and they use you mostly as a gofer. Eventually, when you learn the ins and outs, you may be in charge of building a skyscraper. That's a scary thought, isn't it?
 

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Personally, I'd consider finishing off the degree you've already got time invested in. If you leave now with plans on going back at some point, the likelihood of that happening is minimal. Seen folks go that route many times.

I'm a firm believer that education for the sake of education is never a bad thing. I've got a university degree in behavioural sciences around here in my office somewhere. I was employed in the field for 10 years before I ended up painting for a living. Don't regret finishing my degree one bit. Still believe I use it almost every day.

Once you jump into the trades, it's never a bad thing to have in your back pocket and if it's related to what you want to do it's gotta be better than not having it.
 

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If you already have a bunch of credits you should finish it. Having a degree is never a bad thing to fall back on. I did it before really knowing what I wanted to do. Can't say my degree in business administration has been all that helpful but I'm glad I finished what I started and who knows maybe one day maybe I'll need it.

If you hadn't started school at all my advice might have been different but no matter what having an education is never a bad thing.

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At the time when I graduated, I was selling computers for a living full time. As soon as I got my degree, my boss took all my business cards and tossed them. Ordered a bunch with BaH after my name. I said "But my degree has nothing to do with computers?"

"Doesn't matter, makes you sound smart! Now SELL SELL SELL!" (spoken with a thick French accent.)
 

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The more credentials the better, in my opinion.

It used to be that a high school education was enough to get a person into the job market. Typically, these jobs were entry level with the opportunity to increase earnings as the skills developed. Eventually, management positions would be available to those who applied good work ethics and job knowledge rather than academic achievement. That's no longer the case.

In this age of college pursuit right out of high school, and at great cost for many, it seems to be expected that one holds a college degree of some sort in order to apply for a well paying job, or to promote within. HR people are more apt to disregard anything less. I know. I've been rejected for promotion many times because I only hold a high school degree, regardless of the numerous adult education classes I've taken that have earned me a lot of CEU's but few college units.
 

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you could be a Sherwin Williams assistant store manager and make $28k a year.......
 
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The asst. manager of the S/W store here does not have a degree, she started out part time. She just took over as manager of a store 20 miles from here. Merit does count sometimes.
 

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There are a few “it depends” here. What degree are you pursuing now? How far along are you and how difficult would it be to change your major? What are your goals after school?

As an ex-educator, you think I would be an advocate of more education no matter what - not so. Although a degree will never hurt, and it certainly can help open doors in many areas, having one in order to be a painter, or even owning your own company, certainly wouldn't be a requirement.

However, if you are going to be seeking employment, and advancement to upper management (thinking a good sized construction firm here) a degree of any type will likely be a requirement. If for no other reason, it can demonstrate to a potential employer that you have the drive and stick-to-it-ness to make it in their company.

In the long run, being able to present your self professionally, having the ability to communicate clearly and effectively, possessing good people skills (all things the college experience can help you develop), along with a huge dose of common sense, will all serve you much better than any actual piece of paper on the wall.
 

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Out of high school I started a construction management course at a local college. I wanted to use that to give me the knowledge to become a general contractor, builder, or business owner.
The problem was, you end up spending so much time learning stuff that won’t benefit you. Howether, that’s how all schools work.
I would say, if you are planning on doing your own thing (start a business) in the future, your best education will be devoting 1 week infront of YouTube with a pen and paper getting answers to all your questions on starting a business. (That’s what I did). It was weird spending a week doing that, but I easily learned all I needed in 1 week, where as that would’ve taken me over 2 years of expensive college to answer.
Then, starting a business is simple, I bet in your first year you’ll make more than you ever could have expected.
However, if you want to be an employee that is paid well, then get the degree. I will never be a well paid employee. Because first of all no one offers what you’re worth, and secondly I don’t have a degree. But by doing my own thing, I’ve launched myself to making great money working basically part time.
 
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