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Pressure applied by a brush and roller is probably less than pressure applied by a gun.... So there goes that theory.

Best practice is brushing and rolling because there are skills required? That's a load of BS. it also takes practice and skill to spray properly. How could the best way of doing something be the "most difficult" or "most traditional"? That makes absolutely no sense at all. The best way of doing something should be based on getting the best results, not on some old fashioned thinking.
So, Granny Gwenwald needs her modest sized kitchen walls and ceiling repainted. Cabinets are stained Oak. Masterwork is hired to paint it. After all the general prep, he masks everything in preparation for airless spray. LOL.
 

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The point is, brushing and rolling is a tried and true fundamental of the painting industry. The airless is a tool advancement for production purposes, but it is not always applicable.

Example; A typical welding course begins with oxy/acetylene. And although MIG, TIG, and Stick are far more productive, O/A is a fundamental that remains. And the reason is, there are times when you have to apply a craft in its most basic form in order to avoid the complications that technology and advancements can bring. It's not "Old Fashion". It's common sense.
 

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So, Granny Gwenwald needs her modest sized kitchen walls and ceiling repainted. Cabinets are stained Oak. Masterwork is hired to paint it. After all the general prep, he masks everything in preparation for airless spray. LOL.
And there you are, 30 feet up in a factory, brushing the metal deck by hand. Pure craftsmanship at its finest.
 

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And there you are, 30 feet up in a factory, brushing the metal deck by hand. Pure craftsmanship at its finest.
That wouldn't be common sense.

Believe me, I've sprayed plenty in the industrial coatings trade. I totally have respect for a skilled sprayman. And there are some things that require spraying specifically. But without respect for the brush and roller, you're missing the core of what makes a painter a painter. In my humble opinion.
 

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Noones arguing that brush and roller isnt the fundamentals of the industry, but youre making it sound like a job that is done by hand is 'better' than a job that was sprayed which simply is untrue.

And, I think it goes without saying that we're talking about a big enough job that warrants spraying, and not just Grandmas kitchen... Does that really need to be specified?
 

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There is a time and a place for every type of application. Many variables involved in every scenario that need careful planning. If were talking about drywall though, I believe if your spraying, backrolling is best practice mostly because it will give some texture to hide imperfections and provides a more consistant sheen and over all even application. Have you ever looked down a sun wall that hasn't been backrolled? You can see all the tape lines and sprayer patterns. I Tried not backrolling on this Church renovation one time. It looked horrible. Had to re-roll eveything.
 

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There is a time and a place for every type of application. Many variables involved in every scenario that need careful planning. If were talking about drywall though, I believe if your spraying, backrolling is best practice mostly because it will give some texture to hide imperfections and provides a more consistant sheen and over all even application. Have you ever looked down a sun wall that hasn't been backrolled? You can see all the tape lines and sprayer patterns. I Tried not backrolling on this Church renovation one time. It looked horrible. Had to re-roll eveything.

It's perfectly fine to spray and not backroll the primer. But you must roll the finish. The only time I've had issues is when the taper sands the paper to the point where the whole wall is fuzzy. Then you want to backroll the primer.
 

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Doesn't back-rolling primer help ensure adhesion and uniformity?
Adhesion, no. Uniformity, yes, if you're not 100% when it comes to spraying. If you notice that you're having a hard time keeping it looking even while it's wet, go backroll it.

Spraying concrete block walls, always backroll, to fill the pinhole. Spraying won't fill those. Spraying metal duct work, poured/smooth concrete, etc... No backrolling.
 

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I agree. An ever so slight stippled finish helps with touch ups. However, I still don't see how introducing the stress of spraying can be beneficial when you end up using a roller anyway. You can dip a roller in a five and slap a load of paint pretty quickly and still have time to roll it out evenly.

I just like the methodical and peaceful process of rolling verses the noisy airless, overspray, cramped trigger fingers, dragging hoses, clogged tips, and the clean up. Not to mention the herniated disk from lifting that heavy motor all over the place. At the end of the day, I think spraying is an application designed to hit it and walk away without any further disturbance.
Like anything in painting, you have to look at the situation and make an educated decision on how to go. A one size fits all rarely applies. Case in point, did a rental recently with no floor covering in place and popcorn ceilings. No brainer to spray. On the second coat I back rolled (textured walls) and trust me, as someone who usually rolls, spraying and back rolling is way faster than rolling only. No contest.
But, spraying is typically not my choice for interior due to the large amount of prep involved - the exception being what I described above (which was almost like doing new construction).
 

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Like anything in painting, you have to look at the situation and make an educated decision on how to go. A once size fits all rarely applies. Case in point, did a rental recently with no floor covering in place and popcorn ceilings. No brainer to spray. On the second coat I back rolled (textured walls) and trust me, as someone who usually rolls, spraying and back rolling is way faster than rolling only. No contest.
But, spraying is typically not my choice for interior due to the large amount of prep involved - the exception being what I described above (which was almost like doing new construction).
Why not just use a power roller? Then, you don't have to do all the masking. At the end of the day, just roll it. Otherwise. you're just competing for the lowest bid based on speed. Mike drop
 

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News flash! Brush and rolled walls have held up as a painting standard in the twenty first century, despite its over four hundred years inception, and despite the machine spray power options from Tesla and Chevron.
 

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Why not just use a power roller? Then, you don't have to do all the masking. At the end of the day, just roll it. Otherwise. you're just competing for the lowest bid based on speed. Mike drop
On New Construction, I only spray my primer and millwork. Everything else is brush and rolled. Unless there is no crown moulding I'll spray and backroll my ceilings also. Or spray the crowns in with ceiling colour..Saves alot of cutting in. It's kind of silly to spray the topcoats on walls if everything else is already painted. That would be a ridiculous amount of masking.
 

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Why not just use a power roller? Then, you don't have to do all the masking. At the end of the day, just roll it. Otherwise. you're just competing for the lowest bid based on speed. Mike drop
Guess in your rush to instruct me as to how I should have done it, you missed the part about the popcorn ceilings. You can pick up the mic.
 

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My take (for what it's worth):

To do anything -RIGHT- takes skill. Lots of people Brush, Roll & Spray with no skill. What has been reiterated in the thread multiple times, is you have to factor in a lot of variable to find the correct application for the job.

In a lot of new commercial work, we will spray the Primer and 1st Finish coat, allow many of the other finishes to be installed, and return and Brush and roll the final coat. This serves two main purposes:
  • Less Trade Damage - By returning after many of the other finishes have been installed we mitigate a lot of extra work with Trade Damage. When presented to the GC correctly they can usually see that it will save them money in the long run because while our base price is higher, it saves them money because there is a lower Allowance calculated in and they don't spend a lot of time dealing with back charges or extra work for trade damage.
  • Maintenance - A Rolled wall is much easier to touchup by the regular maintenance crew.
We paint LDS Temples in many countries and we have developed a reputation with the Owner because our mantra has always been: This building has to be maintained. If we only spray the finish, then you will need to bring back a crew from the US for even the smallest touchup. But if we roll the finish, then your engineer can usually make a manageable repair until somebody can return or other work is scheduled. Temple finishes are a WHOLE different level than most other buildings I have ever worked in. The line that helped me sell the Church on not dictating the means and methods (Spray Only) was: They didn't spray the Sistine Chapel, and nobody complains about the quality... 🤷‍♂️
 

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Guess in your rush to instruct me as to how I should have done it, you missed the part about the popcorn ceilings. You can pick up the mic.
lol! I was in a rush. Recovered the mic. And, split my pants when I bent over. I hope you're happy now.
 

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Why not just use a power roller? Then, you don't have to do all the masking. At the end of the day, just roll it. Otherwise. you're just competing for the lowest bid based on speed. Mike drop
What about the doors and trim? Not only is it faster to spray them, but it looks a hell of a lot better too. What about all the brush work? That takes time. Thats why a power roller makes little sense to me. And yes, speed=money. It doesnt matter how much you bid the job for, if you can get it done in a fraction of the time with no drop in quality, its kinda stupid not to.
 
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