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My take (for what it's worth):

They didn't spray the Sistine Chapel, and nobody complains about the quality... 🤷‍♂️
Well, if you and the client dont mind spending literally ten years painting a ceiling, and you can charge accordingly... More power to you.

I sometimes do the 'wait until the end for the final coat, too.' Depends on how my schedule is though. If I HAVE another job to go to until that time, great.
 

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What about the doors and trim? Not only is it faster to spray them, but it looks a hell of a lot better too. What about all the brush work? That takes time. Thats why a power roller makes little sense to me. And yes, speed=money. It doesnt matter how much you bid the job for, if you can get it done in a fraction of the time with no drop in quality, its kinda stupid not to.
OK. It's stupid not to spray. lol.
 

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Yeah, I'm always a bit baffled as to why “speed” is often used like a dirty word.

Certainly, in its basest form, speed can equate to the blow and go business model; outfits that get the bid based on the lowest price, not because they can be competitive utilizing well honed practices, but because they don't give a fart. They can't build a business on repeat customers or referrals, and they really don't care. They generally are in a race to the bottom and most often are no longer to found in a few years time.

No, I am not talking about speed in the way that equates to sloppiness, poor workmanship, or cutting corners. I am talking about speed in terms of efficiency and experience. Experience in any aspect of our trade helps one to be come more efficient. Planning and sequencing is a huge part of that. We know that we typically need to be thinking several steps ahead - so we are now doing "A" so that we can do steps B, C, and D in due course. And that results in efficiency and that results in speed.

Speed is also achieved by knowing (and having the ability) to utilize the best process and tools that will allow one to complete a job satisfactorily in the shortest amount of time. As I referenced to earlier, the recent job of a rental I was asked to do for some neighbors (who are also good friends) in order to get it ready for selling was a good example. Pop corn ceilings, no floor coverings to worry about, windows that were sheetrock in on three sides with only a sill to paint differently, doors pulled (including hinges), cabinets in the kitchen and bath that could be easily isolated for painting later, all pointed to spraying as the most efficient, and fastest, way to go. And having the option (and confidence) to choose the best way to proceed - not just a once trick pony - makes you a more rounded, and successful professional.
 
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The obsession with pulling out an airless at every chance possible, particularly on residential repaints, has everything to do with the illusion of speed. It's a hyper reaction to minimizing the impact of constrained time frames, economy budgets, ladder usage, over scheduling, caffeine, impatience, and a competitive and saturated field. At the end of the day, the pace of spraying is frenetic and often requires more prep and clean up than one would like to believe.

With that said, of course there are times when spraying is more practical. But more often than not, it's used as a complete replacement for brushing and rolling in the same way the nail gun has replaced the hammer. And there enlies the working man's plight. Run at everything you do for fear of not keeping up. Try sustaining that pace for the long term. lol.
 

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And really, the point still remains. Why would you spray when you end up back rolling anyways? And this is coming from someone whose sprayed more metal surfaces than you'd like to believe, yet never back rolled any of them unless there were runs, or curtains.
 

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There's more...

I'm guessing that besides creating an even more toxic environment than painting already is, by choosing to spray, most of you don't even use full face respirators with tear away lenses. How many of you still rub Vasoline on your face in order to make it easier to wipe off the Rocky Racoon makeup? At least you're wearing a spray sock. lol!
 

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And really, the point still remains. Why would you spray when you end up back rolling anyways? And this is coming from someone whose sprayed more metal surfaces than you'd like to believe, yet never back rolled any of them unless there were runs, or curtains.
In my prime, I could roll out every drywall surface in a 3500 sq ft home solo in < 8 hrs w/2 workers cutting, and 1 helper masking after cutting. Although I might be mistaken due to having-zero- experience w/airless sprayers, I think you’d be hard pressed to match or beat those numbers using an airless and back rolling, taking into account all the additional masking & protection when spraying.

I’ve personally have never seen or heard of painters using airless sprayers locally for drywall in residential houses except for tracts until joining this forum. Maybe it’s a regional thing?
 

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And really, the point still remains. Why would you spray when you end up back rolling anyways? And this is coming from someone whose sprayed more metal surfaces than you'd like to believe, yet never back rolled any of them unless there were runs, or curtains.
I've enjoyed your banter back and forth, and hesitant to jump in ( to the fire). I agree with many points on both sides.

It takes a lot more effort to roll a new ceiling, than to simply backroll after spraying- not to mention that you are constantly re-loading the roller between passes, and the new drywall is sooo absorbent. I prefer spraying for ease on new construction only, especially the primer coat if possible. But sometimes the prep is more of a hassle than I care to deal with.

I just rolled a 1000 sq ft garage because I didn't want to prep some critical areas (garage door and opener, windows, doors, furnace), and I knew it would take about the same amount of time to prep and spray as it would to roll- and it was safer to just roll.

However, I remember thinking that the primer coat was sooo tiring, because it just sucked up the paint, and I was constantly re-loading the roller. The top coats were great, and enjoyable even, but I was seriously second guessing the rolling on the primer coat!

I generally only spray new construction walls - and trim whenever it is loose (not installed yet).
I think I will continue to backroll spraying, just to make touch-ups easier, and catch any accidental sags in the corners.
 

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I'm guessing that besides creating an even more toxic environment than painting already is, by choosing to spray, most of you don't even use full face respirators with tear away lenses. How many of you still rub Vasoline on your face in order to make it easier to wipe off the Rocky Racoon makeup? At least you're wearing a spray sock. lol!
spraying = not healthy environment.
+1 on that comment!
 

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In my prime, I could roll out every drywall surface in a 3500 sq ft home solo in < 8 hrs w/2 workers cutting, and 1 helper masking after cutting. Although I might be mistaken due to having-zero- experience w/airless sprayers, I think you’d be hard pressed to match or beat those numbers using an airless and back rolling, taking into account all the additional masking & protection when spraying.

I’ve personally have never seen or heard of painters using airless sprayers locally for drywall in residential houses except for tracts until joining this forum. Maybe it’s a regional thing?
You need to try it. You'd be shocked at how fast you can go, especially if you think you're making good time, now.
 

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And really, the point still remains. Why would you spray when you end up back rolling anyways? And this is coming from someone whose sprayed more metal surfaces than you'd like to believe, yet never back rolled any of them unless there were runs, or curtains.
Because its WAY faster. How many more times does this need to be explained? Spraying and backrolling is AT LEAST four times quicker than brushing and rolling, especially with trim. So, if you bid a job for 20,000 in labor cost, you would profit up to $15000 MORE by spraying and backrolling than doing it by hand, with NO degredation of quality. AND, you'd be getting to your next job all the more quicker too, so thats even more money. Once again, this is assuming its a single color, Getting into masking walls and ceilings to do spray two different colors is a whole other topic, and I personally dont do that. Different colored walls get done by hand in my work world.
 

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In my prime, I could roll out every drywall surface in a 3500 sq ft home solo in < 8 hrs w/2 workers cutting, and 1 helper masking after cutting. Although I might be mistaken due to having-zero- experience w/airless sprayers, I think you’d be hard pressed to match or beat those numbers using an airless and back rolling, taking into account all the additional masking & protection when spraying.

I’ve personally have never seen or heard of painters using airless sprayers locally for drywall in residential houses except for tracts until joining this forum. Maybe it’s a regional thing?
How many coats?
 

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How many coats?
One coat on walls and two on ceilings with the trim being finished beforehand (ceilings and walls were different colors). Below is a link to the actual 3500 sq ft house years after originally painting it. We got into the second coat on the ceilings but didn’t quite complete all of them. Had one mechanic rolling (me), 2 cutting, and a helper dusting as well as masking/protecting horizontal surfaces.


511 Sagaponack Rd in Sagaponack | Out East
 

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Because its WAY faster. How many more times does this need to be explained? Spraying and backrolling is AT LEAST four times quicker than brushing and rolling, especially with trim. So, if you bid a job for 20,000 in labor cost, you would profit up to $15000 MORE by spraying and backrolling than doing it by hand, with NO degredation of quality. AND, you'd be getting to your next job all the more quicker too, so thats even more money. Once again, this is assuming its a single color, Getting into masking walls and ceilings to do spray two different colors is a whole other topic, and I personally dont do that. Different colored walls get done by hand in my work world.
I don’t often get presented with a situation where it’s just plain smarter to spray than roll but when I do, I don’t hesitate to do it. If one takes the position of always automatically resorting to brush and roll rather than considering spraying, it’s just as limiting and foolish as someone who always chooses spraying - even when it doesn’t make sense to do it. And spraying and then back rolling is way faster. IMO, anyone who argues differently just hasn’t done much (if any) of it.
Oh, and nail guns are great in many situations too - like for attaching baseboard trim. No worries about splitting or denting the wood, bending the nail or trying to counter sink it, or accidentally scraping the floor with the hammer while nailing close to and parallel to it. Ever try to hold a piece of stubborn trim in just the right position and then nail it in place with a hammer? What a PITA. And even if it wasn’t faster (which it is), it’s just plain easier and more efficient.
 

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The bottom line is, you shouldn't be a one trick pony when it comes to finding more than one way to skin a cat. Get your act together, don't have second thoughts, give it a shot and hopefully it will be a piece of cake. Then, before you know it, it will be in the bag (with flying colors) and without costing your customer an arm and a leg.

I was feeling idiomatic today.
 

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My rule is, if ceilings and trim are getting a color change with the walls, and the house is empty, Im spraying. If its a repaint, with just ceilings and walls, I'll probably just cut and roll, but if its empty and huge, there are situations I might spray the ceilings and cut and roll the walls.

But if its a single color house, without floors to worry about, raw texture and trim, its just plain silly to cut and roll primer, then two topcoats on everything, rather than spray and backroll.
 

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And really, the point still remains. Why would you spray when you end up back rolling anyways? And this is coming from someone whose sprayed more metal surfaces than you'd like to believe, yet never back rolled any of them unless there were runs, or curtains.
Well your suppose to backroll on drywall. IMO. Also applying the paint by sprayer would eliminate the need for brushwork in the corners, atleast on the primer coat. I personally don't see the benefit of spraying walls if your ceiling and trims are a different colour. If it's all going the same colour and the trim is installed last (which is weird) then spray away. Metal doesnt need or suppose to be backrolled.
 

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Well your suppose to backroll on drywall. IMO. Also applying the paint by sprayer would eliminate the need for brushwork in the corners, atleast on the primer coat. I personally don't see the benefit of spraying walls if your ceiling and trims are a different colour. If it's all going the same colour and the trim is installed last (which is weird) then spray away. Metal doesnt need or suppose to be backrolled.
Here's an example: Ceilings white but walls....pink? Spray the pink, first, right up and just barely onto the ceiling. Hit the wall 100%. Then, pick a closet, switch from your pink to white in the pump, by the time you've sprayed the closet, you now have the white for the ceilings. Spray the ceilings, just hitting the top of the wall less than the width of a paintbrush. When you cut in the wall for your final coat (all by hand of course), you've saved a bunch of time, even if you end up having to cut in one spare time alone the ceiling.
 

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When I look deep into a customers eyes and carefully explain how I will not be using an obnoxious spray apparatus to paint their beautiful home, an immediate calm smooths over their burdened face and I'm once again golden. - Douglas Boyle, 1982 Kenpo Karate state champion and owner of Boyle's Painting and Faux Finishes. "Brush and roll is my style. What's yours?"
 

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Airless spraying is the fastest and most versatile way to achieve professional painting results and spray the widest variety of materials, unthinned. In fact, using an airless sprayer is up to 10 times faster than using a brush, and at least four times as fast as a roller. Airless spraying achieves this speed by atomizing, or breaking up fluid into small droplets, without the use of compressed air. Instead, fluid is pumped under high pressure through a spray tip. The fluid emerges from the tip as a high-speed solid stream – but when that stream hits the air, it becomes disrupted – and the fluid separates into very small droplets that form the spray pattern. If you’ve ever placed your finger over the end of a running garden hose, you created a very simple form of airless spray.
 
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