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Airless spraying is the fastest and most versatile way to achieve professional painting results and spray the widest variety of materials, unthinned. In fact, using an airless sprayer is up to 10 times faster than using a brush, and at least four times as fast as a roller. Airless spraying achieves this speed by atomizing, or breaking up fluid into small droplets, without the use of compressed air. Instead, fluid is pumped under high pressure through a spray tip. The fluid emerges from the tip as a high-speed solid stream – but when that stream hits the air, it becomes disrupted – and the fluid separates into very small droplets that form the spray pattern. If you’ve ever placed your finger over the end of a running garden hose, you created a very simple form of airless spray.
Where did you copy and paste that from?
 

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Here's an example: Ceilings white but walls....pink? Spray the pink, first, right up and just barely onto the ceiling. Hit the wall 100%. Then, pick a closet, switch from your pink to white in the pump, by the time you've sprayed the closet, you now have the white for the ceilings. Spray the ceilings, just hitting the top of the wall less than the width of a paintbrush. When you cut in the wall for your final coat (all by hand of course), you've saved a bunch of time, even if you end up having to cut in one spare time alone the ceiling.
Yes, I guess that would work if there were no crown mouldings or door casings on yet.. However, I spray all my trim and crown, and there is no way your getting away with one cut of pink paint over white. Or visa versa. So many different situations. Although I also spray my closets out with the trim paint. Ceiling paint is not appropriate for a closet IMO. Maybe in tract homes or something.. But, I'm also speaking from doing mostly custom renovations.
 

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I think you missed my point.... You never spray the finish coat. Spray the primer, and maybe the first coat of finish, with backrolling. Final coat is always done by hand.
 

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Yes, I guess that would work if there were no crown mouldings or door casings on yet.. However, I spray all my trim and crown, and there is no way your getting away with one cut of pink paint over white. Or visa versa. So many different situations. Although I also spray my closets out with the trim paint. Ceiling paint is not appropriate for a closet IMO. Maybe in tract homes or something.. But, I'm also speaking from doing mostly custom renovations.
Now I always use ceiling paint in closets. Walls, trim, and shelf. The paint is less expensive and it covers well. If I did with trim paint then it would have the trim sheen(Satin or semi gloss). Closets shouldn't be shiny. What is your reasoning for trim paint in the closets vs ceiling or is it just professional preference? Just wondering.
 

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Now I always use ceiling paint in closets. Walls, trim, and shelf. The paint is less expensive and it covers well. If I did with trim paint then it would have the trim sheen(Satin or semi gloss). Closets shouldn't be shiny. What is your reasoning for trim paint in the closets vs ceiling or is it just professional preference? Just wondering.
For 1, you can spray them out with your trim. 2, it's way more durable for a closet. Shoe scuffs etc. Ceiling paint isn't designed for walls. I know everyone does it because its cheaper but it wouldn't fly in the custom homes I work in. Also just my preference I guess.
 

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I think you missed my point.... You never spray the finish coat. Spray the primer, and maybe the first coat of finish, with backrolling. Final coat is always done by hand.
Yes, but if you over spray your ceiling and trim paint onto the walls, won't you have to cut in twice anyhow? But then I guess theoretically you'd only have to roll 1 more time, so I kinda get ya.
 

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Now I always use ceiling paint in closets. Walls, trim, and shelf. The paint is less expensive and it covers well. If I did with trim paint then it would have the trim sheen(Satin or semi gloss). Closets shouldn't be shiny. What is your reasoning for trim paint in the closets vs ceiling or is it just professional preference? Just wondering.
I usually do the insides of closets just like the rest of the job. Ceiling paint on ceiling, wall paint on walls, trim paint on trim and shelving. But if the wall paint is on the dark side I do ask if the client wouldn't rather just have white to keep it brighter (which often turns out to be the case). In that case I'm prone to paint the closet walls in with the ceiling paint. But I'll always put the trim paint on the trim and shelving because that's usually a white semi and it will handle the abuse better and clean better than a flat ceiling paint.
 

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Can't ever recall using actual trim paint on anything in a closet other than shelving. Never have (or would) consider doing the ceilings of a closet in ceiling paint and the walls differently. Just too small a place to try and do two types of product and not something anyone would ever notice - probably even if you pointed it out. I will just use whatever I have the most of still around.
 

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Yes, but if you over spray your ceiling and trim paint onto the walls, won't you have to cut in twice anyhow? But then I guess theoretically you'd only have to roll 1 more time, so I kinda get ya.
I never spray trim. Everything is finished by hand, so touch-ups can be done in the future.
 

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Certain small pantry-like closets with shelves all the way up get sprayed with trim 100%. Small closets get sprayed with ceiling paint. Sometimes, I'd just spray it out with the trim while Im doing shelves, if I feel it'd take too long to cut the walls back flat. Walk in closets might get treated like the rest of the room.
 

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Those of you advocating for "spraying"... are you spraying in "finished" homes?

I'm all for spraying new construction (or when the trim can be completed off-site or in a separate space) but I almost NEVER spray in a finished, occupied home - too much liability with overspray drifting every which way, and too much effort to prep..

Not much time or effort saved for the average room, imo.
 

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Thats just crazy....
Last time I sprayed doors, upon the insistence of the customer, they called me back a few months later to repaint them by hand. They had dinged the doors and tried doing touch-ups, but they stood out like crazy. They wanted something easier to maintain rather than respraying every time.
 

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Last time I sprayed doors, upon the insistence of the customer, they called me back a few months later to repaint them by hand. They had dinged the doors and tried doing touch-ups, but they stood out like crazy. They wanted something easier to maintain rather than respraying every time.
Of course doing touch-ups on trim and doors is a bit of an art form - requiring some smaller artist brushes and patience rather than the two inch chip brush many HOs will reach for.
 
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