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I have a client who has several huge flat-screen tv's around her home. She's having a hard time finding someone to uninstall and reinstall them for her. She knew someone who she thought could take care of it but he's moved so now she's hesitating on accepting my bid because getting someone to come out just for the tv's is expensive. Should I offer to take care of it for her?

Do you guys offer to do this kind of thing? Those tv's are probably 1500 each. And then the liability if, god forbid, it falls off the wall in a few months... Should I just let her handle it?
 

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I have a client who has several huge flat-screen tv's around her home. She's having a hard time finding someone to uninstall and reinstall them for her. She knew someone who she thought could take care of it but he's moved so now she's hesitating on accepting my bid because getting someone to come out just for the tv's is expensive. Should I offer to take care of it for her?

Do you guys offer to do this kind of thing? Those tv's are probably 1500 each. And then the liability if, god forbid, it falls off the wall in a few months... Should I just let her handle it?
Yes, I would do it if I felt like helping, had the time, and it was worth my time.
For established customers I am willing to help whenever possible with things like that, or I would put them in contact with someone who can. Maybe even make the connection for them.
 

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I've done 3 wall mounts in my own house and two for friends. As long as you're drilling into studs and using lag bolts you should be fine. Where TV wall mount setups get tricky is with steel studs (no blocking/racking strength for a TV wall mount) if you have studs other than about 16" spacing (most mounts are for 16") or if you have masonry or plaster walls. Masonry you rely on anchors, of which the included ones may be of questionable strength. Plaster and lath can be tricky, as finding studs is hard and you're breaking plaster/etc. Personally I'd do it if it was normal drywall walls with 16" studs. If you're keeping the mounts up and cutting around them, then it takes less knowledge, though.

You ideally want a second person to help you both with removal and reinstallation of the actual TV, reinstallation especially, as you'd want to have someone else hold/balance the TV while you screw it into the other part of the mount. One thing to be careful of with modern TVs is they have very skinny bezels, I bought a TV to part out where the prior owner broke the screen as he gripped it too hard when mounting it on the wall. So try to use only enough grip and don't grip them too firmly now. Put them down gently, too, and try to store them on top and around blankets of some sort, too, in a place where they can't move. Sudden jolts when moving them could cause ribbon cables to unseat inside, etc, so just be smooth/etc.

It's up to your discretion and comfort level. It's harder to do experiments in customer's houses on the spot, it's much better next time a friend needs one done to do it for some beer and pizza where the consequences aren't as high, then you have the knowledge to make a decision on whether to do it in a paying customer's house.
 

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Concerning the liability, check with your insurance company to see if doing what you are considering would be in the scope of your coverage. If you have to take them down to paint, it might be. If you just doing this as a side gig, most likely not.
If you are unhooking them, take a bunch of pictures of how everything is connected (which cables go where) so you can easily reconnect everything back up again.
I’ve wall mounted a few of the big screens with the pivoting brackets and mounting the brackets is the toughest part. Of course the TVs are light but they are way too awkward to manage alone so, as was already mentioned, have some help available.
 

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If they are on a swing arm, you can usually just tape it up. If it's not, just take a picture of where all the connectors go. Most of those tv's just lift off the holder easily, with 2 people of course. We do it all the time. No need to actually remove the wall bracket..
 

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If they are on a swing arm, you can usually just tape it up. If it's not, just take a picture of where all the connectors go. Most of those tv's just lift off the holder easily, with 2 people of course. We do it all the time. No need to actually remove the wall bracket..
Yep I remove them all the time, no biggie. I'm not touching the brackets though. If they feel the overwhelming desire to have paint behind the brackets they have to remove and reinstall themselves. 99% of people don't care but there's always that one weirdo who likes things painted even if it's never visible and serves no purpose.
 

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Lol I had a lady ask me to remove some vanity lights in her bathroom to paint behind them. I told her I'm not an electrician and she whined that the last painter she called did it for her. I told her to call him again next time.
 

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I had a GC’s AV guy install a massive bracket mounted TV on a master bed wall with custom mahogany pocket doors right and left of the TV. I’ll leave it up to you to guess what happened when I tried pulling the doors shut later that day, although they wouldn’t budge when tugging on the latches.

Edit: Yup, the AV contractor drove the mounting lag screws right through the pocket doors, both being replaced.
 

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Yep I remove them all the time, no biggie. I'm not touching the brackets though. If they feel the overwhelming desire to have paint behind the brackets they have to remove and reinstall themselves. 99% of people don't care but there's always that one weirdo who likes things painted even if it's never visible and serves no purpose.
HEY! I have painted behind the brackets! Oh... point made I guess.:unsure:
 
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If TV's are staying, paint close to the bracket. If brackets are moved, keep in mind that Tv's are not that heavy, and mounting brackets are designed for overkill for weight. Most huge mirrors and paintings weigh more than TV's and they are often secured by just a couple nails. A single lagbolt in a stud is more than enough to handle most TVs, but the bracket usually has four of them in studs. that'll damn near hold a car. Check your insurance for sure, but dont overthink it.

Noones gonna see close to the bracket on a wall, so noone should ask it to be removed just for painting purposes. You can always use the liability excuse if the want it taken down though.

Lights, on the other hand I believe should be taken down and reinstalled, unless they are crazy expensive/look like they can break. Now that I do wallpaper, if I see lights in the pictures that look breakable, or something, I tell them its on them to get them taken down and reinstalled, but normal lights, I do myself.
 

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HEY! I have painted behind the brackets! Oh... point made I guess.:unsure:
It depends on the plan for the room later on. If you don't paint behind the bracket you have a 16" touch up in the middle of the wall that looks pretty blatant if the bracket ever comes down. If you paint behind it, you have the holes to fill, but touchup is more reasonable.
 

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Here’s a good one..I had one of my clients hire another company to refinish some cabinets and the owner’s rep sent me the following pic....the painters never removed the TV and skipped the 3 panels altogether!

111212


Edit: Actually found a before pic..

111213
 

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It depends on the plan for the room later on. If you don't paint behind the bracket you have a 16" touch up in the middle of the wall that looks pretty blatant if the bracket ever comes down. If you paint behind it, you have the holes to fill, but touchup is more reasonable.
Oh c'mon. What someone is going to do 3,4,5 years down the road is not your problem. They will most likely be repainting anyhow. That's just silly talk.
 

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Most of the time we usually bag the whole TV in plastic, carefully tape off the brackets, and paint around them.
(*happy to come back and touch-up if they move the bracket)
 

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Most of the time we usually bag the whole TV in plastic, carefully tape off the brackets, and paint around them.
(*happy to come back and touch-up if they move the bracket)
I've done this and it's usually fine. But you can really only do it with a full motion mount, which are more common nowadays. With the older flat to the wall mounts, you have less space and can't move the TV out to get around it. Most people are switching to full motion now, though, as the price of the mounts has come down tremendously (I have three $42 with coupon Harbor Freight mounts in my house.)

Also with full motion mounts, it becomes more important to make sure you do a good job with actually finding the studs if you are mounting them. Reason is, the farther away from the wall, the more the moment arm puts forces on the wall vs mounting it flush against the wall. Also newer TVs generally are really light, but older TVs are way heavier. Some of the old plasmas are almost 200lbs. I mounted a 65" 2011 or so Samsung that weighed about 80lbs on my mom's wall recently.

A small hobby of mine is finding old TVs with issues for free/cheap that still have a good panel and replacing boards or backlights to fix them. Currently I have 4 TVs over 50" in my house I've fixed up this way. Kinda unrelated to the discussion, or a weird flex on my end, but hey.
 

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I've done this and it's usually fine. But you can really only do it with a full motion mount, which are more common nowadays. With the older flat to the wall mounts, you have less space and can't move the TV out to get around it. Most people are switching to full motion now, though, as the price of the mounts has come down tremendously (I have three $42 with coupon Harbor Freight mounts in my house.)

Also with full motion mounts, it becomes more important to make sure you do a good job with actually finding the studs if you are mounting them. Reason is, the farther away from the wall, the more the moment arm puts forces on the wall vs mounting it flush against the wall. Also newer TVs generally are really light, but older TVs are way heavier. Some of the old plasmas are almost 200lbs. I mounted a 65" 2011 or so Samsung that weighed about 80lbs on my mom's wall recently.

A small hobby of mine is finding old TVs with issues for free/cheap that still have a good panel and replacing boards or backlights to fix them. Currently I have 4 TVs over 50" in my house I've fixed up this way. Kinda unrelated to the discussion, or a weird flex on my end, but hey.
Yes, the close mount ones can present a challenge, haven't run into one of those for a while.
Speaking of locating the studs - have you tried the Franklin ProSensor?

Cool that you are into replacing boards and backlights - probably no shortage of TV's around.
I like installing sound systems - nothing too special, but every car i have owned for the past 15+ years has an upgraded sound system , as well as my shop and my house (shooting for crystal clear sound with balanced mids, highs, and lows). Fun hobby, and appreciate it when I spend time there.
 

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Yes, the close mount ones can present a challenge, haven't run into one of those for a while.
Speaking of locating the studs - have you tried the Franklin ProSensor?

Cool that you are into replacing boards and backlights - probably no shortage of TV's around.
I like installing sound systems - nothing too special, but every car i have owned for the past 15+ years has an upgraded sound system , as well as my shop and my house (shooting for crystal clear sound with balanced mids, highs, and lows). Fun hobby, and appreciate it when I spend time there.
I used to use a stud finder, but over the years now I get a powerful half inch or so neodymium magnet, and find the nails in rows, mark them off until I find what consistently looks like a stud, and that's all.

My cars have all but one had an aftermarket head unit at some point in their life, and about half I've upgraded the speakers, too. At home I have nice audio stuff, too. Mostly 90s "BPC" gear but there's a lot of overlooked gems of that era. Everyone wants the silver and wood stuff and I can't blame them, but for value for money something like a Pioneer VSX-D1S is about $300 and 180WPC, whereas to get a 180WPC silver faced receiver it's way over $1000 now at the very low end, and more like $2000.
 

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I used to use a stud finder, but over the years now I get a powerful half inch or so neodymium magnet, and find the nails in rows, mark them off until I find what consistently looks like a stud, and that's all.

My cars have all but one had an aftermarket head unit at some point in their life, and about half I've upgraded the speakers, too. At home I have nice audio stuff, too. Mostly 90s "BPC" gear but there's a lot of overlooked gems of that era. Everyone wants the silver and wood stuff and I can't blame them, but for value for money something like a Pioneer VSX-D1S is about $300 and 180WPC, whereas to get a 180WPC silver faced receiver it's way over $1000 now at the very low end, and more like $2000.
I’m kind of late to the audio party, and have a lot to learn- a lot I don’t know.
I would think 180 watts/channel would power anything you throw at it!

Bluetooth connectivity was important to me, because I listen to Spotify most of the time...so I have a modern receiver HK3770, powering Polk rc80i in-ceiling speakers in my shop. It’s not ‘great’ sound, but it’s not bad, and nothing sitting on the floor. If I was a little more tech savvy, there are many gems sitting on Craigslist and eBay right now. If a person knew how to fix speaker cones and foam, they could pick up some high-end wood cabinet speakers for a song.

My current vehicle has a new head unit (Pioneer AVIC) but because it’s one of those proprietary speakers/amp systems, I didn’t touch the speakers.
 
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