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FT painter/FT dad
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funny you should ask this...I just had my first callback in a long time for a "bubbling vinyl shutter". I typically use 1.2.3 primer than topcoat with superpaint. But I'm thinking applying a bonding primer may be better (even though 1.2.3 can go on a LOT of substrates). I'm curious what other guys are doing as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Rich,
I use 1.2.3 and been having major problems. I hate when a job calls for painting them. I'm hoping others have better methods.

Tim
 

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Rock On
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No primer
Just clean well and coat with Moorglo or Duration
No warranty either...might stick, might not...I have found no sure fire always works process
(I think it's more of a vinyl/condition/location thing than a coating thing)

The thing is, to remove them and paint them...then reinstall them...the cost (to customers) is almost what new ones would cost (removal and re-install is the same, labor and paint product is almost the same price as a new shutter...works out to almost the same)
So really I end up doing mostly "custom" colors
 

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"Fusion" areosal from SW or home centers, I guess it fuses with the plastic. A SW manager painted half of a plastic mailbox for a display, I picked at it, and it was on there.
 

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This last house, shutters were taken down and done on horses (duration). Since they were washed with tsp and bleach, no primer. Even so, the first coat should be thin.
 

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Painting shutters- some answers

Not all plastic shutters are created equal. Some are PVC, some polypropylene, and some polyethylene. The polyethylene ones usually can't be painted successfully. I used XIM's Plastic and Vinyl bonding primer on my polypropylene shutters. Super adhesion. Recommended by a couple of shutter manufacturers. I work for XIM so obviously cost was not an issue.
 

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FT painter/FT dad
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Most have a raised grain anyway.
they do? not the vinyl one's I've painted

I think the comment on the different types of materials is key to figuring out which method/product to use
 

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they do? not the vinyl one's I've painted

I think the comment on the different types of materials is key to figuring out which method/product to use
I agree on the different types. Tim asked about vinyl (polyvinylchloride).
Guess I shouldn't have said most have a grain. I've been working with the grained ones a lot lately and fell into that thinking. sorry.
 

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The difference in "vinyl" shutters and the difficulty in painting them is the ones that come pre-colored are made of polypropylene and paint does not adhere to them well. There offer paintable ones that are made of polystyrene has better adhesion for painting. They still recommend priming them first as they come in a gray color.
I guess the term "vinyl" shutters is used pretty loosely as "vinyl" would really mean PVC (poly vinyl chloride) which is what most fence material is made of, polypropylene is a member of the ethylene family (like HDPE - High Density Polyethylene and LDPE - Low Density Polyethylene) largely used for milk jugs, yogurt containers etc. Polystyrene is part of the Styrene family; such as crystal polystyrene - all those clear take out containers or ABS - Acronitrile Autadiene Styrene which is very tough and is often used in automobile parts and commercial piping.
They now have PVC composite products that are stronger and very paintable.
Anyway; with the industry largely calling them vinyl shutters its difficult to know what type of primer to use if you don't know what the material is actually made of. Hope this helps.
 

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The difference in "vinyl" shutters and the difficulty in painting them is the ones that come pre-colored are made of polypropylene and paint does not adhere to them well. There offer paintable ones that are made of polystyrene has better adhesion for painting. They still recommend priming them first as they come in a gray color.
I guess the term "vinyl" shutters is used pretty loosely as "vinyl" would really mean PVC (poly vinyl chloride) which is what most fence material is made of, polypropylene is a member of the ethylene family (like HDPE - High Density Polyethylene and LDPE - Low Density Polyethylene) largely used for milk jugs, yogurt containers etc. Polystyrene is part of the Styrene family; such as crystal polystyrene - all those clear take out containers or ABS - Acronitrile Autadiene Styrene which is very tough and is often used in automobile parts and commercial piping.
They now have PVC composite products that are stronger and very paintable.
Anyway; with the industry largely calling them vinyl shutters its difficult to know what type of primer to use if you don't know what the material is actually made of. Hope this helps.
Usually posts to necro-threads (2007 in this case - settle down Bill) are less than helpful. Glad to see one that was very informative. Thanks.
 

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I was asked to paint some vinyl ( not sure PVC, plastic or what they were made out of ) shutters by a builder. There was a big label in each box stating that the shutters were not paintable. He insisted that we paint them to match ext trim. At the time I was demoed some SW Resilience,
So we lightly sanded and painted them. This was 6 years ago they still look good ... And I really don't use that paint a lot come to think of it now


Sent from my iPad using PaintTalk.com
 

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PinheadsUnite
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Usually posts to necro-threads (2007 in this case - settle down Bill) are less than helpful. Glad to see one that was very informative. Thanks.
I saw it was additional info for an age old issue. I'm settled :thumbup:

but my trigger finger still itches :whistling2:
 
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