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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering what everyone is using to fill nail holes on frames? I’ve been using Dap Alex plus spackling. The stuff has been decent, but find i always need to do 2 fills on mdf. I’m open to other suggestions!! Has anyone tried Dynatron glazing and spot putty? I’ve been seeing that around a lot.
 

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Just wondering what everyone is using to fill nail holes on frames? I’ve been using Dap Alex plus spackling. The stuff has been decent, but find i always need to do 2 fills on mdf. I’m open to other suggestions!! Has anyone tried Dynatron glazing and spot putty? I’ve been seeing that around a lot.
If you are talking interior, we use Red Devil Onetime. I'm pretty partial to the stuff. I leave it heavy and sand it.

For cheap work, you can knife it tight and paint over in one go...especially for nail holes in walls with flat or eggshell.
 

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I've been using any brand's variation on DAP's fast 'n final. It's quick to apply - mush it in and swipe it off with a putty knife. When it dries it actually bellies out a bit (rather than sinking in), and then a quick scuff with even as little as 220 knocks it flat. And it doesn't get brittle - stays soft and flexible which just means it holds up well inside and out. Of course, the "soft" means it isn't suitable for all applications. But for nail holes on trim, no problem.
 

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Elmer's wood filler is king of all fillers! Not the pro gritty stuff, the smooth stuff is the original e855 white and e868 natural I believe. I use this on a daily basis and have almost eliminated spackle from my jobs. It dries fast, I mean real fast, bubble your holes but don't put in on heavy, use white on bare wood and natural on white so you can see what you are doing, use a 3/4" putty knife and save yourself product and sanding time, if you're good single fills will be around 80-90% effective, flashing is minimized by the density of this product, no fisheye or paint freakouts like bondo because it is water-based. I use 150g or 180g purple 3m sandpaper for sanding this stuff depending on if it bare wood or previously finished, enjoy you will love it. I now use it instead of spackle on my walls for most small repairs because of most of the same reasons. If you or someone else ever puts it on way to heavy, save your self the sanding and get out a wet rag and knock it down real fast. Hope this helps. It's truly the best filler out there hands down, I've literally tried every product there is.
 

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I used Crawfords for a while it is probably my favorite "spackle". The dry time is still problematic for mid and deep repairs such as nail pops and big miters. It is my second go to next to the Elmer's. Also the tin quart cans rust so fast, create chunks in it and result in throwing away a lot of product to get clean stuff underneath. I recently found half pint jars of it in plastic which is the only reason it's still in my arsenal. Elmer's does everything better once you know how to use it. If your doing walls and have overnight for patches to dry, crawfords is a good option, if you need to get on it in an hour or two Elmer's never let's me down! Also beat up corner beads or trim corners can be much more easily and strongly reformed with Elmer's opposed to any spackle out there, unless you have a day to spare to wait for MH ready patch to set up properly.
 

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I used Crawfords for a while it is probably my favorite "spackle". The dry time is still problematic for mid and deep repairs such as nail pops and big miters. It is my second go to next to the Elmer's. Also the tin quart cans rust so fast, create chunks in it and result in throwing away a lot of product to get clean stuff underneath. I recently found half pint jars of it in plastic which is the only reason it's still in my arsenal. Elmer's does everything better once you know how to use it. If your doing walls and have overnight for patches to dry, crawfords is a good option, if you need to get on it in an hour or two Elmer's never let's me down! Also beat up corner beads or trim corners can be much more easily and strongly reformed with Elmer's opposed to any spackle out there, unless you have a day to spare to wait for MH ready patch to set up properly.
Try some goodfilla, will change your mind on that the best filler out there is
 

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I'm always looking for the latest and greatest, tell me more. Which one for general filling, the bag or the pre-mix? I love the Elmer's because of everything it does and the small handheld tube is easily resealed, not wasted, easily dispensed onto small putty knife and relatively inexpensive. Where have you seen the biggest benefits of your Goodzilla-filla? Knowledge is power and I have a proven product that continues to amaze me day in and day out, please give some more details for all of us playing in the spackle game!
 

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+1 for Fast n Final and One Time.


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Had to repair a badly damaged surface recently, and "USG Icing" worked well for shallow damage on smooth surfaces where Vinyl spackle would not work.
It's like traditional Bondo, but for fine scratch repair or leveling paint chipping. Pretty toxic (really bad!), but it works well and its "almost white" in color, so it hides easily with a coat of primer. I have it in the arsenal, but would like to replace it with something that's less toxic.

I'm interested in learning more about the Bondo Glazing Putty. Is it red?
 

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Elmer's wood filler is king of all fillers! Not the pro gritty stuff, the smooth stuff is the original e855 white and e868 natural I believe. I use this on a daily basis and have almost eliminated spackle from my jobs. It dries fast, I mean real fast, bubble your holes but don't put in on heavy, use white on bare wood and natural on white so you can see what you are doing, use a 3/4" putty knife and save yourself product and sanding time, if you're good single fills will be around 80-90% effective, flashing is minimized by the density of this product, no fisheye or paint freakouts like bondo because it is water-based. I use 150g or 180g purple 3m sandpaper for sanding this stuff depending on if it bare wood or previously finished, enjoy you will love it. I now use it instead of spackle on my walls for most small repairs because of most of the same reasons. If you or someone else ever puts it on way to heavy, save your self the sanding and get out a wet rag and knock it down real fast. Hope this helps. It's truly the best filler out there hands down, I've literally tried every product there is.
I love the Elmer's because of everything it does and the small handheld tube is easily resealed, not wasted, easily dispensed onto small putty knife and relatively inexpensive.
If you like it that much I'll give it a try.
 

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I'm always looking for the latest and greatest, tell me more. Which one for general filling, the bag or the pre-mix? I love the Elmer's because of everything it does and the small handheld tube is easily resealed, not wasted, easily dispensed onto small putty knife and relatively inexpensive. Where have you seen the biggest benefits of your Goodzilla-filla? Knowledge is power and I have a proven product that continues to amaze me day in and day out, please give some more details for all of us playing in the spackle game!
Goodfilla has a really nice workability, comes in various ready mixed colors and comes in a trowel ready grain filling or as a putty. Sands like a dream too.
The powder is nice very economical and can be mixed with any latex paint/primer (match your top coat), water or lacquer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I’ll definitely give the elmers and the fast and final a shot. I like the idea of the fast and final being a patch and prime in one to eliminate priming, but usually do two coats on the trim so I guess there is no need to really skip the prime step... I do however absolutely love the idea of using the tan coloured elmers on white trim. Actually wish I thought of that sooner.
 

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I’ll definitely give the elmers and the fast and final a shot. I like the idea of the fast and final being a patch and prime in one to eliminate priming, but usually do two coats on the trim so I guess there is no need to really skip the prime step... I do however absolutely love the idea of using the tan coloured elmers on white trim. Actually wish I thought of that sooner.
I generally don't prime it, but it definitely flashes like mad - although I've never met a patching compound that doesn't. So a spot of primer won't hurt. But 2x top coats usually gets it too. I will use it on smaller wall repairs and such too, and when I do, I typically run around and spot them when I start cutting in which means they end up w 3 coats.

I'll have to try the goodfilla at some point too.
 

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Elmer's wood filler is king of all fillers! Not the pro gritty stuff, the smooth stuff is the original e855 white and e868 natural I believe. I use this on a daily basis and have almost eliminated spackle from my jobs. It dries fast, I mean real fast, bubble your holes but don't put in on heavy, use white on bare wood and natural on white so you can see what you are doing, use a 3/4" putty knife and save yourself product and sanding time, if you're good single fills will be around 80-90% effective, flashing is minimized by the density of this product, no fisheye or paint freakouts like bondo because it is water-based. I use 150g or 180g purple 3m sandpaper for sanding this stuff depending on if it bare wood or previously finished, enjoy you will love it. I now use it instead of spackle on my walls for most small repairs because of most of the same reasons. If you or someone else ever puts it on way to heavy, save your self the sanding and get out a wet rag and knock it down real fast. Hope this helps. It's truly the best filler out there hands down, I've literally tried every product there is.
I'm a huge wood filler fan, too. I've not found Elmers lately, though. I've been using the SW wood filler and Plastic Wood. But yeah, I think wood filler is the gold standard for hole filling. Awesome stuff.
 

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Yep. Any of the "light weight" fillers like "one time" are great for nailholes or deep wounds. Doesn't shrink, minimal sanding. Not great for shallow repairs though. A creamier spackle is best for 2nd coating and little dents. Bondo indoors? Gross. Not necessary.
 

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Elmer's wood filler is king of all fillers! Not the pro gritty stuff, the smooth stuff is the original e855 white and e868 natural I believe. I use this on a daily basis and have almost eliminated spackle from my jobs. It dries fast, I mean real fast, bubble your holes but don't put in on heavy, use white on bare wood and natural on white so you can see what you are doing, use a 3/4" putty knife and save yourself product and sanding time, if you're good single fills will be around 80-90% effective, flashing is minimized by the density of this product, no fisheye or paint freakouts like bondo because it is water-based. I use 150g or 180g purple 3m sandpaper for sanding this stuff depending on if it bare wood or previously finished, enjoy you will love it. I now use it instead of spackle on my walls for most small repairs because of most of the same reasons. If you or someone else ever puts it on way to heavy, save your self the sanding and get out a wet rag and knock it down real fast. Hope this helps. It's truly the best filler out there hands down, I've literally tried every product there is.
Thank you for this note, I never would have tried this without a solid, knowledgeable reply like yours ; have a 1920's reno to fill nail holes after install, going to give it a go.
 

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I'm a huge wood filler fan, too. I've not found Elmers lately, though. I've been using the SW wood filler and Plastic Wood. But yeah, I think wood filler is the gold standard for hole filling. Awesome stuff.
We used on a large commercial product and it worked well, the deep red color was more difficult to hide with paint, though.
 
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