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Discussion Starter #1
Like many painters I'm sure, I get ideas for inventing and improving on products and techniques.

I'm brainstorming improving the essential painters tool...drum roll...the paint brush.

So I wanted to make an informal poll:

What is most important to you in a brush?

And maybe more importantly, what do you struggle with with most brushes? What are your pet peeves in design and performance?

Thanks and brush on!
 

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Correct labeling on bristle package. fi: if you say the brush is ultra stiff, don't give me a limp poly/nylon brush. And when its supposed to be super soft, again no limp poly/nylon brush. There needs to be clear differences between brush lines, not just the handle.
 

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The only way to improve a paintbrush is to make sure that there is always someone else around at the end of the day to clean it for me. And it must be someone who is competent enough to clean it properly. So I think you're inventive imaginings are on the wrong target.
 

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For me, that is a tough question to answer since it depends on what I am trying to do.

I typically like angle brushes regardless of what I am painting and prefer a stiffer brush for cutting in walls and ceiling since our textures tend to make it harder to get paint on them, at least IMO.

For trim, doors, casings, etc, I prefer a softer brush.

Of course I want all of them to hold their shape and edge well and prefer that they wash out decently.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
The only way to improve a paintbrush is to make sure that there is always someone else around at the end of the day to clean it for me. And it must be someone who is competent enough to clean it properly. So I think you're inventive imaginings are on the wrong target.
Ha...I'll see if I can whip up some clones or robots!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
For me, that is a tough question to answer since it depends on what I am trying to do.

I typically like angle brushes regardless of what I am painting and prefer a stiffer brush for cutting in walls and ceiling since our textures tend to make it harder to get paint on them, at least IMO.

For trim, doors, casings, etc, I prefer a softer brush.

Of course I want all of them to hold their shape and edge well and prefer that they wash out decently.
Heard. Spoiler alert...what I have in mind in particular is the holding the shape aspect.
 

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How about this - my favorite brush handle is fashioned into a 5 in 1. Brush on one end. 5 in 1 on the other. But the handle is also hollowed out to become a flask. So I just pop out what looks like a rivet, and there's my whiskey stash.
 

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I think for inventive purposes most versions of the paint brush have been tried. What I'd like is an alternative to plastic. Something maybe reusable, or compostable, or made from recycled plastic. The other thing I'd like to see is a way to capture the waste water and seperate the paint from the water in a productive means. Our industry wastes so much it would be great to find solutions.
 

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I think for inventive purposes most versions of the paint brush have been tried. What I'd like is an alternative to plastic. Something maybe reusable, or compostable, or made from recycled plastic. The other thing I'd like to see is a way to capture the waste water and seperate the paint from the water in a productive means. Our industry wastes so much it would be great to find solutions.
I agree with you. I hate all of the plastic that I waste. A local, Massachusetts, news show did a segment on a company that has created a coating that allows for liquid to slid out of bottles and cans without any friction. Think, the last few ones of shampoo. I thought that this would be great for the painting industry...all the paint would easily pour out of the cans, tray liners could be used multiple times...eat.
I spend way too much time cleaning out the white buckets I buy in hopes of getting another use out of them before they find their way to landfill.
 

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I agree with you. I hate all of the plastic that I waste. A local, Massachusetts, news show did a segment on a company that has created a coating that allows for liquid to slid out of bottles and cans without any friction. Think, the last few ones of shampoo. I thought that this would be great for the painting industry...all the paint would easily pour out of the cans, tray liners could be used multiple times...eat.
I spend way too much time cleaning out the white buckets I buy in hopes of getting another use out of them before they find their way to landfill.
A little water in the last remnants of a paint can make it easy to consolidate paint into one can, or just a good ole piece of cardboard to scrape the paint out. I will say, I am not a fan of plastic gallon buckets, you can't smash them down with your boot like a nice tin can.
 

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I never understood the usefulness of liners....just added cost for avoiding a few minutes of cleanup. Plastic trays wash out easily at the end of the day. And the environmental impact of using the liner....wasteful, if environment is a concern.

Although a useful trick to extend the use of the liner in to wash it clean it at the end of the day and use again.

Better yet.....put a second liner on top of the first. The first liner ends the day as clean as it began it. The second liner you merely dispose of. Or I suppose you could add a third liner to protect the liner protecting the first liner....

As far as my favorite brushes, generally like a fairly stiff 3" angle brush for cutting walls and ceilings and a 2.5 inch for most trim. Exterior - 3" flat brush for the lion share. Composition was never that crucial for me for most stuff.....the good brushes generally have quality bristle that do what they should. Chinex is good, but never thought it a game changer. Of course nothing but China bristle for oils.
 

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Where do you usually buy your brushes? I am from Alabama, United States Zip Codes. It would be greatly appreciated if you can give me a hint on a good online store in the neighborhood. I have tried a lot of brands and still do not seem to have found the favorite one. Thanks to everyone who will take time to share their best brush findings.
 
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