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Where do you usually buy your brushes? I am from Alabama, United States Zip Codes. It would be greatly appreciated if you can give me a hint on a good online store in the neighborhood. I have tried a lot of brands and still do not seem to have found the favorite one. Thanks to everyone who will take time to share their best brush findings.
I don't believe you.
 

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I don't really know to be honest. I use a combination of different brushes depending on the paint thickness/leveling/drying times, and the surface I'm painting. Generally stiffer brush=thicker faster drying paint or a rough surface, softer brush=thinner slower drying paint and a smoother surface. Of course there's "medium" brushes I use for most things (Wooster Silver Tip would be my go to...) but on occasion I'll use lots of stuff.
 

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A little water in the last remnants of a paint can make it easy to consolidate paint into one can, or just a good ole piece of cardboard to scrape the paint out. I will say, I am not a fan of plastic gallon buckets, you can't smash them down with your boot like a nice tin can.
Absolutely correct. In the old days, paint factories would take latex paint remnants and pour them into cardboard boxes, allow to dry and then dispose of dried waste. A paint store uses the same procedure when a can is ruptured or split. An ear caves in, the lid is bent. Spread to a half inch thickness and the paint should dry within the week. We use Carriers who are equipped to dispose of paint.. The bad paint is shipped to South Carolina or Arizona with a licensed Hazardous Material handler for shipment. Very expensive, well over $10 a gallon to recycle.

Plastic cans are even worse for the paint store. There is currently a shortage of metal cans so plastic gallons are making a comeback. Anyone who ever bought Emerald will remember the first 3 years, the paint was shipped with the plastic cans. Anyone who brought back a gallon because it went bad because it would not remain sealed, was cheerfully given a free replacement gallon. Mistints in South Florida are sold to exporters who ship to south and Central America. Rematching a misting usually causes another misTint.
 

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I don't believe you.
Lol. Buying a brush online is like buying a used truck online? I'm old and fashioned. In 1967 a Paint Jobber (sold a paint line for a manufacturer, drop cloths, caulk and spackle line and a brush line. In 1967 the Bruning paint rep also sold Pittigoff block brushes. He told me this, take the brush out of the package and the first thing you to is look at the tip of the brush, see how well the bristle is flagged and tipped. this effects how much paint the brush will hold at the tip. Run your hand down the bristles, slap them, see how firm of stiff the bristles handle. Part or split the bristles to expose the ferrule. 3 rows are better than 2, how wide are the bristles packed? Inspect the ferrule, will it stop the rust? Finally, do a dry cut in to see how the bristles perform. Finally the handle, Long, Dutch, oval and weight. Last, but not least, is the brush for you or your employees. I suggest you give them an allowance so the will take care of their own brushes. Everyone has lost a few hundred or thousand dollars because your employees do not take care of your equipment. lol, get the hint. All else fails, get the chip brushes with the Yak from the north side of the mountain.

Corona, Wooster, Purdy and Linzer all make fine brushes.
 

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Lol. Buying a brush online is like buying a used truck online? I'm old and fashioned. In 1967 a Paint Jobber (sold a paint line for a manufacturer, drop cloths, caulk and spackle line and a brush line. In 1967 the Bruning paint rep also sold Pittigoff block brushes. He told me this, take the brush out of the package and the first thing you to is look at the tip of the brush, see how well the bristle is flagged and tipped. this effects how much paint the brush will hold at the tip. Run your hand down the bristles, slap them, see how firm of stiff the bristles handle. Part or split the bristles to expose the ferrule. 3 rows are better than 2, how wide are the bristles packed? Inspect the ferrule, will it stop the rust? Finally, do a dry cut in to see how the bristles perform. Finally the handle, Long, Dutch, oval and weight. Last, but not least, is the brush for you or your employees. I suggest you give them an allowance so the will take care of their own brushes. Everyone has lost a few hundred or thousand dollars because your employees do not take care of your equipment. lol, get the hint. All else fails, get the chip brushes with the Yak from the north side of the mountain.

Corona, Wooster, Purdy and Linzer all make fine brushes.
As a retailer Linzer and Whizz/E&J are hard to beat.
 

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if im cutting where it counts all i really care about is accuracy and is why i like the wooster ultra firm. brush size is a key choice also, lots of painters arnt realistic with how much paint they can control
 

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I swear by Purdy brand. Now, I know some love Contractor series and so on but my three mains are:

1). Purdy Pro Extra - Walls
2). Purdy Clear Cut - Trim (Not shown)
3). Purdy White Bristle (White China) - enamel/oil base.
4.) Purdy XL- stains etc.

I love the hold, feel and application of paint they provide. Durability and a little costly but under contractors account at SW, still very affordable as my pros. Cons, in recent years they have developed this "duck tail" split when cleaning them. All my brushes after use return to their shucks to keep form. Seems like after SW bought Purdy brand they haven't been the same. However, minor problem. I love them, easy to train and no hard on the wallet, great results as well. Used daily by two generations of painters in my family.

111960
 
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