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Good people of paint talk! Heya how are yous?! I’ve been lurking a longish time, not much for posting but I’ve come across something the other day requiring some inquisition. Figured it would be a good time to pop up and engage. I’ve gotten a ton of useful knowledge outta here. Been painting around about 10 years all with the same company and just started off on my own about a year and a half ago. I learned a lot over my time at my old gig but only through higher end interiors which never really presented the same kind of issues I’ve been getting. Reckon that’s a just a different tax bracket type of thing lol. Any how, I went out to look at a job the other day and I wanted get a idea if I’m on track with what is needed here... View attachment 112004
View attachment 112005
Looks like oil??? I’m not sure wth is going on here but my approach would be to knock down all of the failing paint, bin spray or killz any of the mold or water staining, patch up as needed, loxon primer, whack it with new ceiling. What do y’all think?
With all due respect, it would be good, since you already know how to post photos and write, even in your local colloquial dialect, if you could not assume as much as you seem to as far as how much we here at Paint Talk understand what your problem is and how you are trying to correct such problems. From what I have seen of your photos it appears to me that you are showing the ceiling of a bathroom. More specifically, it looks to me like hardware attached to a ceiling that holds shower curtains up. It also appears to show cracking and peeling paint. I don't see any info on what part of the globe this ceiling is located on except for your y'all dialect pointing me to somewhere in the southern US.

I would be interested in the location, geographically-wise, of the house you are speaking about as well as the age of the house, whether there is plaster or drywall, is there a fan, all kinds of stuff to accurately describe what you are trying to do with the materials you are working with and on.

I am currently trying to work up an estimate on a painting job in a high rise in Chicago that involves water damage in the bathroom ceiling. I advised the owner to check with the building engineers to find out why there is water damage on the ceiling BEFORE I do any work on it. She has put in this request for this coming Monday.

futtyos
 

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With all due respect, it would be good, since you already know how to post photos and write, even in your local colloquial dialect, if you could not assume as much as you seem to as far as how much we here at Paint Talk understand what your problem is and how you are trying to correct such problems. From what I have seen of your photos it appears to me that you are showing the ceiling of a bathroom. More specifically, it looks to me like hardware attached to a ceiling that holds shower curtains up. It also appears to show cracking and peeling paint. I don't see any info on what part of the globe this ceiling is located on except for your y'all dialect pointing me to somewhere in the southern US.

I would be interested in the location, geographically-wise, of the house you are speaking about as well as the age of the house, whether there is plaster or drywall, is there a fan, all kinds of stuff to accurately describe what you are trying to do with the materials you are working with and on.

I am currently trying to work up an estimate on a painting job in a high rise in Chicago that involves water damage in the bathroom ceiling. I advised the owner to check with the building engineers to find out why there is water damage on the ceiling BEFORE I do any work on it. She has put in this request for this coming Monday.

futtyos
futtyos - Haven't heard much from you in awhile. Was it my post in another thread where I said I typically only use primer for specific problem areas that summoned you? :unsure:;)
 

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I'm going to make a couple of guesses here. Given the ceiling appears to have a transition from flat to sloping, the room has knee walls.....the ceiling is in fact within inches of the exterior roof deck (especially the sloping portion). Very little air circulation above that type of ceiling; and in the winter that ceiling probably is well below ambient room temp. due to poor insulation. Both factors are a perfect set up for trapping "shower fog" and condensation, respectively.

My second guess is that you live in PA coal country, a climate that exacerbates the condensation factor in the winter. The "yous" and "heya" gave that one away....heyna'???

Some good suggestions in the thread on how to handle the repaint, but I'd be hesitant to guarantee the work. Even with a fan installed. Achieving a lasting product might be tough if the guess in my first paragraph is correct. The limited amount of air space (could be as little as 4" in older buildings) makes the prospects of the space above the ceiling being properly insulated or having adequate air flow unlikely. The perfect setup for failure....
 

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54pontiac
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I always assumed that peeling like that was indicative of latex over oil. This is common in older houses where they started with an oil layer years ago. Inevitably someone just slaps latex over it at some point. The latex never truly bonds and over time, especially with moisture issues, it will just come apart like that. I would also scrape and prime as advised above. And recommend a fan.
 

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One thing that absolutely drives me crazy is when people wire the fan so that it comes on when the light comes on. I'm sure that people do it so their kids won't not turn the fan on when they're having a shower or 'otherwise', but nothing sucks more than spending a good part of a day painting a bathroom with that thing blaring away in the back ground.
I know this is nine days later, but one reason the fan may be wired like that is if its an afterthought. I once installed a fan in a house we were renting, and totally wanted to wire in a timer, or at least its own switch, but I would have had to tear into walls to run more wiring, so I simply tapped into the wiring of the light to power the fan. Actually, I DID cut a couple holes in the wall to try to wire its own switch, before I realized that theres no power that actually runs to the lightswitch, just a common lead. Anyway, thats why. If you dont want to listen to a fan, you should be able to unplug it in the ceiling.
 
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